“Want fried glucose in your brain?”

Do you want to serve yourself up some” fried glucose” in your brain? Just use your cell phone for 50 minutes at a time while holding it against your ear. The brain glucose metabolism in the region closest to the phone’s antenna is effected.

What is glucose?   Glucose, blood sugar, the major energy source for brain energy enters the brain from the arterial side and is absorbed by astrocytes, which then transform glucose to lactate. Lactate exchange occurs with neurons, which oxidize it to CO2 and H2O drained by the venous blood. The increase in lactate levels and the uncoupling between oxygen consumption and glucose uptake revealed by PET at the early stages of activation, cause lactate fluxes between astrocytes and neurons.

When you hold a cell phone to your ear in an on position for 50 minutes or more it changes the way glucose moves through the brain cells. The area begins to heat only after 5 minutes and changes the biochemistry as proven by PET scans.
During cell phone use in the on and then off positions and found that although whole-brain metabolism was not affected, metabolism was increased in the orbitofrontal cortex and the temporal pole areas of the brain while the cell phone was on, areas that are close to where phone’s antenna meets the head.(brain energy metabolism).
  
Blood-borne glucose is the brain’s fuel and is needed to supply the moment-to-moment changes in energy demand during information processing, the local rates of blood flow and glucose utilization are closely linked to the activities of brain cells. Because the blood-brain barrier restricts transfer of material from blood into brain, many compounds that are readily metabolized by cultured brain cells or brain slices, including lactate, cannot be transported into adult brain in vivo in sufficient quantities to compensate for inadequate levels of glucose and support the brain’s high and continuous energy demand.
Nora D. Volkow, MD, from the National Institute on Drug Abuse in Bethesda, Maryland Hands-free devices or speaker-phone mode should be used to avoid direct contact of the telephone with the head. Previous work suggests that if the phone is a foot or more away it is very unlikely to have any effects, she said.
Caution may be particularly necessary for children and adolescents whose neural tissue is still developing, Dr. Volkow noted.

Other studies have shown that the effects of radio frequency-modulated electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs), particularly carcinogenic effects show some relationship between cell phones and the risk of brain tumor development.
Dr. Volkow’s studies over the past 15 years have shown:

  •  the the brain’s function is affected by brain imaging technologies, including PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) these magnetic fields affect brain glucose metabolism,
  •  static magnetic field of a 4-T MRI does not affect brain metabolism
  • when magnetic fields were changed rapidly, which produces electrical currents, there was a significant increase in glucose metabolism in the brain. They wondered whether the RF-EMFs produced by cell phones might do the same thing.

 metabolism in the regions closest to the antenna, the orbitofrontal cortex (the thinking and decision-making area of the  brain) and temporal pole (part of the temporal lobe). The temporal lobe is involved in auditory perception and is home to the primary auditory cortex. It is also important for the processing of semantics in both speech and vision. The temporal lobe contains the hippocampus and plays a key role in the formation of long-term memory. was significantly higher when the cell phone was on.
Henry Lai, PhD, from the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington, Seattle, and Lennart Hardell, MD, PhD, from the Department of Oncology at University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden, point out that this is the first investigation in humans of glucose metabolism in the brain after cell phone use.
”The results by Volkow et al add to the concern about possible acute and long-term health effects of radiofrequency emissions from wireless phones, including both mobile and cordless desktop phones,” they write.
”Although the biological significance, if any, of increased glucose metabolism from acute cell phone exposure is unknown, the results warrant further investigation.
“
The effects are unlikely to be mediated by the substantial increase in temperature seen with cell phones given the activation was “quite distant” from where the cell phone made contact, they speculate. Further, since the subjects were only listening rather than talking on the phone, “the effect observed could thus potentially be more pronounced in normal-use situations.”
Another major concern is the effects of unmonitored cell phone towers that spider web across the US each one producing many thousands of times higher EMF’s radiation than a cell phone.
 Resources
Excerpts courtesy of medscape.com   http://goo.gl/jIxeuhttp
Excerpts courtesy of  ajpregu.physiology.org  http://goo.gl/hEP9o
Excerpts courtesy of  acnp.org   http://goo.gl/VHvfP

Image  courtesy of quickblogcast.com  http://goo.gl/ZKjwv

“LOXL2 enzyme spreads cancer”

Did you know?
90 percent of cancer-related deaths occur because a tumor migrates around the patient’s body.
A key to unlock metatasis

The LOXL2 enzyme activity has been linked to the metastasis of a variety of different cancers, including breast, esophageal, colon, and squamous cell cancers.

Researchers analysis of breast cancer patients, found poor survival rates and the spread of some cancers  was linked to high levels of the LOXL2 enzyme. This enzyme  has been linked to the early stages of metastasis of these cancers into the bloodstream.

Around 47,000 new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed in the UK each year and around 12,000 die from the disease.

Recent studies have shown that the lifetime risk of the disease for women is now one in eight.

Experts blamed lifestyle factors, including obesity and drinking alcohol, for fuelling the rise.

Women are also more likely to have children later in life and fewer offspring, which influences the risk.

In the latest study, published in the journal Cancer Research, experts found that LOXL2 promotes the spread of breast cancer through the way it controls two proteins, TIMP1 and MMP9.

In the mice studies, antibodies and chemicals were used to block LOXL2 activity. This prevented breast cancer from metastasizing to other tissues.
These findings are important are an important role in developing a test to try and predict the possible spread of cancer and possible patient outcomes.
Director of Research and Policy at Breast Cancer Campaign, Arlene Wilkie, said, “by using LOXL2 to predict whose cancer will spread and drugs to block the enzyme to stop this from happening, many more lives could be saved.”

This laboratory research shows great promise and we look forward to seeing how it translates into patients.”

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of  http://yhoo.it/fzS6Lc

Excerpts courtesy of  http://bit.ly/hfwDfB

“Natural ways to get rid of warts”

No one likes warts, but how do we get them and more important how can they be removed.

A range of types of wart have been identified, varying in shape and site affected, as well as the type of human papillomavirus involved. These include

Common wart (Verruca vulgaris), a raised wart with roughened surface, most common on hands,
but can grow anywhere on the body;  Common warts are different from moles, and they aren’t cancerous. In fact, they’re usually harmless and often disappear on their own. But you may find common warts bothersome or embarrassing, and you may want treatment to remove them.

Treatment helps prevent common warts from spreading to other parts of your body or to other people. But common warts may recur after treatment, and they may be a persistent problem.


Flat wart (Verruca plana), a small, smooth flattened wart, flesh-coloured, which can occur in large numbers; most common on the face, neck, hands, wrists and knees.
Filiform or digitate wart on the lip, is a thread- or finger-like wart, most common on the face, especially near the eyelids and lips.

Plantar wart (verruca, Verruca pedis), a hard sometimes painful lump, often with multiple black specks in the center. They are usually only found on pressure points on the soles of the feet.

Mosaic wart, a group of tightly clustered plantar-type warts, commonly on the hands or soles of the feet;

Genital wart (venereal wart, Condyloma acuminatum, Verruca acuminata), a wart that occurs on the genitalia.
Periungual wart, a cauliflower-like cluster of warts that occurs around the nails.

The human papilloma virus (HPV) is the cause of warts. These growths can  appear anywhere on the skin of the body. From the head and face to the genital area and feet. They may look like small, fleshy bumps; hard, flat growths with a rough surface and well-defined boundaries; gray or brown lumps with tiny pinprick-size black dots.

There are about 130 known types of human papilloma viruses. HPV infects the squamous epithelium, usually of the skin or genitals, but each HPV type is typically only able to infect only a few specific areas on the body. Many HPV types can produce a benign growth, often called a “wart” or “papilloma”, in the area they infect. To grow the papilloma needs a blood supply to nourish it that is supplied by a network of capillaries.

Treatment for common warts

There are many different treatments and procedures associated with wart removal. One review of 52 clinical trials of various cutaneous wart treatments concluded that topical treatments containing salicylic acid were the best supported, with an average cure rate of 75%, compared with 48% for the placebo in six placebo-controlled trials including a total of 376 participants. The reviewers also concluded that there was little evidence of a significant benefit of cryotherapy (freezing with nitrogen) over salicylic acid or duct tape.

In a double-blind, randomized and controlled clinical trial at Mayo in 90 adults when transparent duct tape was compared to mole skin, there was no statistically significant difference for resolution of the target wart between patients treated with moleskin versus patients treated with duct tape. Eight of 39 patients (21%) in the treatment group vs 9 of 41 patients in the control group (22%) had complete resolution of the target wart. Fewer of the patients achieving resolution of their wart in the moleskin group had recurrence of their wart.

For Plantar warts often covering them with duck tape for a week up to 1 month then gently soaking off the tape. Drying the area and rubbing it gently with an emery board or pumice stone. Repeat the process over the course of a month or two before the warts disappear, but a study published in the October 2002 Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine found that the duct tape method worked better than having a doctor freeze the warts off with liquid nitrogen, which can be painful and cause scarring.It  is as effective as using any drug or over the counter preparation on them.

If a person has a very delicate or sensitive skin do not do this treatment. then soak in water and rub gently with an emery board or pumice stone. You may have to repeat the process over the course of a month or two before the warts disappear, but a study published in the October 2002 Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine found that the duct tape method worked better than having a doctor freeze the warts off with liquid nitrogen, which can be painful and cause scarring.

Other treatments for Plantar warts  include Leave them alone. Most will disappear without treatment, sooner or later.
Try a “paint on” solution. Look for an over-the-counter treatment containing a 40 percent salicylic acid, and apply once or twice a day for a few weeks. To help avoid getting plantar warts, avoid areas known to harbor the virus, including warm, moist places such as shower floors, locker rooms and public swimming pools. Always wear shower thongs or sandals when you use a public locker room or shower, and use foot powders and change your socks often to keep feet dry.

Homeopathic medicine has been effective in treating Plantar and figwarts. Contact your local naturopathic or homeopathic health care provider to find the remedy most beneficial to you.

Some have even used visualization to rid themselves of warts. By only seeing the area that holds the wart as perfect skin and the wart shrinking, the frequency of the cells in the area change and if your diet becomes more alkaline then viruses cannot live in an alkaline environment.

For more information on wart removal or to find a natural medicine physician contact Complementary Medicine Association through our email contactus@compmed.com.
Resources

Excerpts courtesy of  http://www.drweil.com

Excerpts courtesy of  http://bit.ly/c3GO97

Image 1. Common wart  courtesy of html  http://bit.ly/c5BlII

Image 2. Filiform wart courtesy of  http://bit.ly/acc1lT

Image 3. Planter wart courtesy of   http://bit.ly/9r8t6a

Image 4. Mosaic wart courtesy of   http://bit.ly/cCO9ci

Image 5. Squamous cell layer of a capillary wall courtesy of   http://bit.ly/dlUdNw

Worms spread by not washing your hands

tapeworm

Do you or someone you love need another reason for good hands hygiene?

Watch the video below; then read the rest of this post.

http://media2.foxnews.com/112008/worm_tumor_700.wmv

Trichinosis is a parasitic disease caused by eating raw or undercooked pork and wild game infected with the larvae of a species of roundworm Trichinella spiralis, commonly called the trichina worm. The few cases in the United States are mostly the result of eating undercooked game, bear meat, or home reared pigs. It is most common in the developing world and where pigs are commonly fed raw garbage.

Signs and symptoms

The great majority of trichinosis infections have either minor or no symptoms and no complications. Trichinosis initially involves the intestines. Within 1-2 days of contagion, symptoms such as nausea, heartburn, dyspepsia, and diarrhea may appear; the severity of these symptoms depends on the extent of the infection. Later on, as the worms encyst in different parts of the human body, other manifestations of the disease may appear, such as headache, fever, chills, cough, eye swelling, joint pain and muscle pain, petechiae, and itching.

Most symptoms subside within a few years. The most dangerous case is worms entering the central nervous system and the brain stem. They cannot survive there, but they may cause enough damage to produce serious neurological deficits (such as ataxia or respiratory paralysis), and even death.

Life Cycle of the worm

The worm can infect any species of mammal that consumes its encysted larval stages. When an animal eats meat that contains infective Trichinella cysts, the acid in the stomach dissolves the hard covering of the cyst and releases the worms. The worms pass into the small intestine and, in 1–2 days, become mature. After mating, adult females produce larvae, which break through the intestinal wall and travel through the lymphatic system to the circulatory system to find a suitable cell. Larvae can penetrate any cell, but can only survive in skeletal muscle. Within a muscle cell, the worms curl up and direct the cell functioning much as a virus does. The cell is now called a nurse cell. Soon, a net of blood vessels surround the nurse cell, providing added nutrition for the larva inside.

A blood test or muscle biopsy can identify trichinosis. Stool studies can identify adult worms, with females being about 3 mm long and males about half that size

Symptoms can be treated with aspirin and corticosteroids. Thiabendazole can kill adult worms in the intestine; however, there is no treatment that kills the larvae. Correct diagnosis and surgery may be needed.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trichinosis

Brain Tumors-New Genetic Pathways

Comprehensive Study of Brain Tumors

New Genetic Mutations, Core Pathway

“The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network, a collaborative effort funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), reported the first results of its large-scale, comprehensive study of the most common form of brain cancer, glioblastoma (GBM). “Sept. 4, 2008, in the advance online edition of the journal Nature, the TCGA team describes the discovery of new genetic mutations and other types of DNA alterations with potential implications for the diagnosis and treatment of GBM.

Among the TCGA findings are the identification of many gene mutations involved in GBM, including three previously unrecognized mutations that occur with significant frequency; and the delineation of core pathways disrupted in this type of brain cancer. Among the most exciting results is an unexpected observation that points to a potential mechanism of resistance to a common chemotherapy drug used for brain cancer.

“… The more we learn about the molecular basis of glioblastoma, the more swiftly we can develop better ways of helping patients,” said NIH Director Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D.

Like most cancers, GBM arises from changes that accumulate in cells’ DNA over the course of a person’s life – changes that may eventually lead to the cells’ uncontrolled growth. However, until recently, scientists have understood little about the precise nature of these DNA changes and their impact on key biological pathways that are important to the development of new interventions.

TCGA researchers sequenced 601 genes in GBM samples and matched control tissue, uncovering three significant genetic mutations not previously reported to be common in GBM. The affected genes were: NF1, a gene previously identified as the cause of neurofibromatosis 1, a rare, inherited disorder characterized by uncontrolled tissue growth along nerves; ERBB2, a gene that is well-known for its involvement in breast cancer; and PIK3R1, a gene that influences activity of an enzyme called PI3 kinase that is deregulated in many cancers. PI3 kinase already is a major target for therapeutic development. The discovery of frequent mutations in the PIK3R1 gene means that GBM patients’ responses to PI3 kinase inhibitors may be dictated by whether or not their tumors have mutated versions of the gene.

The TCGA team combined sequencing data with other types of genome characterization information… to generate an unprecedented overview that delineated core biological pathways potentially involved in GBM. The three pathways, each of which was found to be disrupted in more than three-quarters of GBM tumors, were: the CDK/cyclin/CDK inhibitor/RB pathway, which is involved in the regulation of cell division; the p53 pathway, which is involved in response to DNA damage and cell death; and the RTK/RAS/PI3K pathway, which is involved in the regulation of growth factor signals.

The three pathways were interconnected and coordinately deregulated in most of the GBM tumors analyzed. Therefore, combination therapies directed against all three pathways may offer an effective strategy, the TCGA researchers state.

As in the Human Genome Project, TCGA data are being made rapidly available to the research community through a database, http://cancergenome.nih.gov/dataportal. The database provides access to public datasets, and with required review and approval, allows researchers access to more in-depth data.

Additional information about NHGRI can be found at its Web site,” http://www.genome.gov.