"Hope for traumatic brain injury"

“Brain injuries differ dramatically from patient to patient depending on the location, type, intensity, and duration of the injury. An injury can immediately cause rips in the white matter, brain hemorrhage, swelling, and, most commonly, bruising. One insult (i.e. hitting head, swelling, bleeding or residual trauma from an old injury to the brain)) is superimposed on another as, following the injury, the brain begins to experience reduced blood flow and oxygen deficiency…

Within minutes or hours after an injury, tiny holes rip through neuronal membranes and ion channels get stuck open, leaking proteins and neurotransmitters. Free radicals and calcium spread, causing cell death and tissue damage. Early gene activation of apoptotic enzymes sends more cells into a death spiral. Mitochondria sputter, then fall silent. Astrocytes swell. The damage can be isolated or extensive.

Researchers and doctors to date have had a very antiquated system of classification for TBIs. A new, validated system has now been devised which divides TBI patients into subgroups based on the type and location of injuries, not based on their consciousness. Then, therapies that benefit specific injury types can be targeted to those subgroups. It is the initial step toward a positive clinical trial for TBI.
Another ray of hope for the treatment of TBIs is the use of progesterone. It seems to pose the possibility of becoming the magic bullet for the treatment.
Through  Don Stein’s 27 years of research on progesterone is has been shown that progesterone  produced in the brain as well as the ovaries and can easily cross the blood brain barrier. Both men and women have progesterone receptors in their brains and it  prevents the expression of inflammatory cytokines in the brain, block apoptosis, stimulate growth-promoting factors, and even have a role in remyelination of neurons.

Thus progesterone decreases the accumulation of fluids in the brain after injury, reduces secondary neuronal loss, and improves outcomes in rats. “It’s the Swiss army knife of therapies,” laughs Douglas Smith, director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Brain Injury and Repair. “It can take care of everything.”

Human trials are soon to get under way.

Natural integrated care and medicine like homeopathic remedies and acupuncture and neuro- kinesiology can be used to augment traditional care. These energetic forms of care can monitor the trauma, by the changing pulses and the meridian flows to determine how the body’s energetic systems are dealing with the trauma and then homeopathy can neural-kinesiology can de-stress the neuronal circuitry to enhance the healing and recovery process.
For more information on integrated medicine’s care of brain trauma contact.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of       http://www.the-scientist.com
Excerpts courtesy of       http://bit.ly/bOMYrG
Image courtesy of       http://bit.ly/9fP0gH