“Kids’ health risk higher in stroke belt “

This is not a stroke of good luck belt this is the debilitating possibly paralyzing belt.
Too much fried food may contribute to the high rate of stroke in America’s southern states.
The study claims that eating fried fish twice a week is the possible culprit for the high incidence of stokes in the southern states of the USA.

The results showed that people living in the stroke belt – including residents of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas and Louisiana were about 30 percent more likely to eat two or more servings of fried fish every week than those living in the rest of the country, the researchers said.
However the data did not include all the other deep fried, dairy, pork or butter laden foods so typically consumed by southerners like hush puppies, collard greens or other foods drowned in butter, fries, chicken fried steaks, and cheese sticks to name a few.

Blacks have 3.5 times greater risk

Blacks statistically have an increased risk of stroke regardless of where they live, but their stroke risk was 3.5 times higher if they ate two or more servings of fried fish per week than whites.
Inhabitants of the stroke belt are 20 percent more likely to die from a stroke than those living in the rest of the country. Those living at the center of the stroke belt, the coastal plains of North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, are 40 percent more likely to die from stroke, said study researcher Fadi Nahab of Emory University in Atlanta.
Anything fried in oil or cooked in butter, is not healthy to eat
Stroke Belt or Stroke Alley is the name given to a region in the southeastern United States that has been recognized by public health authorities for having an unusually high incidence of stroke and other forms of cardiovascular disease. It iincludes an 11-state region consisting of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.
Analysis by the CDC of U.S. found that stroke death rates for these states ranged from a high of 169 per 100,000 in South Carolina to a low of 89 per 100,000 in New York. While most observational studies have focused primarily on stroke incidence in adults, in 2004 researchers reported that children in the eleven stroke belt states also have an increased risk of death from ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke compared with children in other states.

Glymour et al. (2007) reported that adults who had resided in the stroke belt during childhood and had moved outside the region had higher stroke risk at ages 50 and older than adults who grew up in areas with lower stroke incidence. Other stroke risk factors: hypertension, low socioeconomic status, diet, quality of healthcare facilities, smoking, and infections.

The Stroke Belt also has high rates of lung cancer, caused by smoking or exposure to cigarette smoke as a child, poverty, poor maternal nutrition,low birth weights would predispose individuals to higher than average risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease.
Smoking or  exposure to second and third hand smoke is reputed to be the strongest contributing factor of developing both diseases


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