“High School Varsity Letters for more than just athletics”

Awarded a “Varsity Letter” in high school is a big deal. Now a forward thinking administrators od Snohomish High Schools in Snohomish County and the United Way are rewarding excellence. Letter men and women earn their Letters for many achievements.

Teens in the Everett district’s high schools have a chance to earn a letter for helping others. Athletes are encouraged to volunteer in the community. Promoting the idea that school isn’t simply about grades and and sports.

A great way to inspire teens to be involved in their community, improve their self worth and emotional health by helping others.

A Varsity Letter now is given for Community Service if student has completed at least 145 hours of volunteer work per year. Those hours can’t include time spent on class work or other graduation requirements.

Helping heal the planet one person at a time starts with helping others and yourself to be better.

Excerpts courtesy of  heraldnet.com

Image thanks to Sara Richards and pinterest.com

“Intuition infants when does it begin?”

“We believe that infants are born with the ability to form expectations and they use these

Baby's Intuitional Skills

expectations basically to predict the future,” Kristy vanMarle, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences in the College of Arts and Science.. “Intuitive physics include skills that adults use all the time. For example, when a glass of milk falls off the table, a person might try to catch the cup, but they are not likely to try to catch the milk that spills out. The person doesn’t have to consciously think about what to do because the brain processes the information and the person simply reacts. The majority of an adult’s everyday interactions with the world are automatic, and we believe infants have the same ability to form expectations, predicting the behavior of objects and substances with which they interact.”

Kristy vanMarle “We believe that infants are born with expectations about the objects around them, even though that knowledge is a skill that’s never been taught. As the child develops, this knowledge is refined and eventually leads to the abilities we use as adults.”

In a review of related scientific literature from the past 30 years, vanMarle and Susan Hespos of Northwestern University found that the evidence for intuitive physics occurs in infants as young as two months – the earliest age at which testing can occur.”

Testing could begin prebirth by assessing the changes in the mother’s food, behavior and music choices.  If a mom after she conceives craves vegetables and she never did before this craving may be the baby’s needs being expressed.

While the intuitive physics knowledge is believed to be present at birth, vanMarle believes parents can assist skill development through normal interaction, such as playing and talking with the child and encouraging him/her to interact with objects.

Human intuition or knowing does not begin or end each life. According to Murshida Vera Corda, PhD, whos’ life work was dedicated to helping parents and caretakers develop the ability to attune to their children. Parents are taught to work with their children from conception on. Talking, becoming aware of their child’s needs through observing what is happening in their five developmental bodies: physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, and ethical/moral, regardless of their chronological age.

In her book Cradle of Heaven, she shows how motherhood and fatherhood consists of a series of skills we relearn in life’s greatest challenge — parenting.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of medicalxpress.com

Image courtesy of http://tinyurl.com/7ubln7h

“A wish for you”


A  Beautiful Parable  








LIFE ISN’T ABOUT WAITING FOR THE STORM TO PASS…
IT’S LEARNING HOW TO DANCE IN THE  RAIN !  We cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust our sails. May love and all that goes with it be yours. 
 
 Submitted by Mary S. Tucson AZ
Author unknown
 

“Angry leave it for the dogs”

“If your dog doesn’t like someone you probably shouldn’t either.”
– Unknown

Has your behavior gone to the dogs?

Even if you are in an angry mood never bark at anyone. It is bad for your image and makes communication tougher.-MW

“The external expression of anger can be found in facial expressions, body language, physiological responses, and at times in public acts of aggression. Humans and animals for example make loud sounds, attempt to look physically larger, bare their teeth, and stare. The behaviors associated with anger are designed to warn aggressors to stop their threatening behavior. Rarely does a physical altercation occur without the prior expression of anger by at least one of the participants. While most of those who experience anger explain its arousal as a result of “what has happened to them,” psychologists point out that an angry person can be very well mistaken because anger causes a loss in self-monitoring capacity and objective observability.”

Speak from your heart so anger never overruns you.

Image courtesy of http://bit.ly/lMjxfL

Excerpts courtesy of http://bit.ly/igyFIB

“4 steps to Breaking The Anger Habit”

Anger is a response learned in childhood to protect us

from the vulnerable feelings that lie beneath the protection.

Four steps that have helped me break the anger habit and reverse the negative consequences that inevitably accompany it are: Awareness, Returning to Center, Learning and Cleaning Up Messes.

Step 1. Awareness – Anger indicates a disconnection from the heart. (Words that to me are the same as heart include: soul, center, essence, true self, authentic self, or Spirit.)  A heart connection is accompanied by compassion and an openness to learning.  When we have committed to being heart-connected more of the time, this awareness gives us choice.  Without it we’re stuck blaming others for our anger, making excuses for it or self-righteously justifying it.  With the awareness that our anger has triggered something in us we take personal responsibility for our choice to either continue being angry or do something that returns us to our center.

Step 2. Returning to center – We all know how to return to center.

Such behaviors include: taking a deep breath (or 2 or more), doing a physical activity such as running around the block, dancing or pounding a pillow, putting on a piece of music that opens our heart, taking a walk in nature, (doing something that makes you smile awhile – editor’s note) or free form writing of our feelings.

Step 3. Learning – Once we’re back in our center we can learn more about the fears and beliefs that got us off center and what we can do to resolve those fears by bringing our beliefs into alignment with our heart.

Step 4. Cleaning up messes – Anger has a negative effect both on ourselves and our relationship with those at the other end of our anger.  Cleaning up these effects means taking responsibility for disrespecting others and expressing our sadness to those whom we have disrespected.  This is essential for rebuilding the trust that is eroded by our anger.

Judging ourselves for getting angry makes taking responsibility much more difficult.  Seeing anger as merely a disconnection from our heart rather than as bad or wrong makes it easier.  The analogy that I use that has made it much easier to not blame myself can be seen at,

Guest writer Dr. Jordan Paul welcomes all comments and questions.

Please submit responses

To  reach Dr. Paul or read more of his articles

Resources

Article by Dr. Jordan Paul

Image 1. courtesy of   http://bit.ly/gWCYOV

Image 2. courtesy of  http://bit.ly/ffLArC

“Where did my anger come from?”

Conventional thinking is that it is good and healthy to express anger. While withholding anger is certainly not in anyone’s best interest, using anger to get others to change their behavior carries with it many negative consequences.

I asked myself, “Where is my anger coming from? ” Then i began to review when I got angry and observed :

My anger seemed to be deeply ingrained in my system and it
Was I born with this anger? – my intuition said no.
Was it a learned response and if so to what? Yes, I learned to use anger to get my way and to protect my sensitive nature from my inner feelings of fear, pain, helplessness
How did I feel about myself when I acted out in anger? When I asked that question I learned that I felt at that moment I was not good enough, lovable or adequate.

So actually, in truth my anger is an expression of my weakness and confusion, not my strength. Being afraid to show my vulnerable feelings is a reflection of my fear that I might be judged by others, and more importantly by myself as weak, unmanly, bad, wrong, stupid, or that I can’t handle my softer feelings and I will be rejected, or that I will be manipulated into doing things that I really don’t want to do.

I have come to understand that when my anger is manipulative it does not contain compassion and a desire to learn and therefore, is not coming from my heart and I am not in oneness.

This is the first in a series of articles and discussions with Dr. Jordan Paul, PhD.
Excerpts from Dr. Paul’s article ANGER or REAL STRENGTH

Image courtesy of  http://bit.ly/hqLR6x

“Behind influencing others lurks a monster”

The back side to influencing others –

Does power or positions of influence over others

like doctors, lawyers, minsters, government … corrupt?

Behavior of the powerful can and often does poison even the most intelligent and well-meaning people when their influential positions go to their head and let ego run the show.

Beware of  the following symptoms of developing ego corruption:

  • focusing more on your own needs and wants and less on the needs and reactions of others;
  • having less empathy for others, acting like the rules don’t apply to you and simply using others for your own selfish ends;
  • exhibiting less impulse control – too much sex, food, drugs, wild life and erratic emotional highs and lows.
  • They do inane things that damage themselves, their families, their business or organization and their country.

The good news is we do have fine examples to follow Dr. Deepak Chopra, Mahatma Gandhi and the Dalai Lama who stay grounded and growing in health, warmth, compassion and spirituality even at the height of their power.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of  http://bit.ly/c4LrFR

“Game designer hero+his gaming community deliver”

Stand and deliver that is what Brian Wood lead designer for Relic Entertainment did as the vehcile approached and he braked hard and cut a sharp right turn. He saved his wife and unborn child from certain death.

Brian spent his life thrilling millions of Relic Entertainment gamers.  It was payback time for the gamers and they have  given Erin Wood a new support system to lighten her heavy heart at this time. The gamers who Brian worked to please have now rallied to support his grieving  widow.

A memorial trust was set up within days of the accident. Countless game developers, journalists and fans posted links on Twitter and Facebook, leading to literally thousands of supportive comments, messages and financial donations, prompting Erin Wood to send an open letter to the gaming community to popular game blog Kotaku.

To help Erin and baby, please visit the Brian Wood Memorial Trust .

Bless everyone who took the time to show their support for such a selfless act. -Staff of CMA

Resource

Excerpts courtesy of   http://yhoo.it/9txAEK

"Your life has a ripple effect "

You are so special.

Never has there been or will there ever be someone just like you again.

Unknowing your every thought, word, action and reaction causes all other living beings to react.

Keep your thoughts about your self and others high to increase your healthy energy footprint on this earth.

Each life has countless effects on others.

Thanks to Humanity Healing and Youtube for this beautiful video presentation.

Click here to watch the “The Ripple Effect: The Heartbeat to Eternity”

.

Rarified sportmanship -people helping people

There were no other options for this coach. It didn’t matter that his DeKalb, Ill., High School basketball team had ridden a bus two and a half hours to get to Milwaukee, then waited another hour past game time to play. Didn’t matter that the game was close, or that this was a chance to beat a big city team.

Johntel Franklin scored 10 points in the game following the loss of his mother.
Something else was on Dave Rohlman’s mind when he asked for a volunteer to shoot two free throws awarded his team on a technical foul in the second quarter. His senior captain raised his hand, ready to go to the line as he had many times before.

Only this time it was different.

“You realize you’re going to miss them, don’t you?” Rohlman said.

Darius McNeal nodded his head. He understood what had to be done.

The Barbs were playing a non-conference game on the road against Milwaukee Madison. It was the third meeting between the two schools.
The teams planned to get together after the game and share some pizzas and basketball-main_fullsoda. But the game itself between these friendly rivals almost never took place.

Hours earlier, the mother of Milwaukee Madison senior captain Johntel Franklin died at a local hospital. Carlitha Franklin in remission from five-year fight with cervical cancer hemorrhaged suddenly while Johntel was taking his college ACT exam.

Johntel and a few teammates were at the hospital late that afternoon when the life-support system was removed. His mom Carlitha was just 39 years old.

“She was young and they were real close,” said Milwaukee coach Aaron Womack Jr., who was at the hospital. “He was very distraught and it happened so suddenly he didn’t have time to grieve.”

Womack was going to cancel the game, but Franklin told him he wanted the team to play. And play they did, even though the game started late and Milwaukee Madison dressed only eight players.

Early in the second quarter, Womack saw someone out of the corner of his eye. It was Franklin, who came there directly from the hospital to root his teammates on.

The Knights had possession, so Womack called a time out. His players went over and hugged their grieving teammate. Fans came out of the stands to do the same.

“We got back to playing the game and I asked if he wanted to come and sit on the bench,” Womack said during a telephone interview.

“No,” Franklin replied. “I want to play.”

There was just one problem. Since Franklin wasn’t on the pre-game roster, putting him in meant drawing a technical foul that would give DeKalb two free throws.

Though it was a tight game, Womack was willing to give up the two points. It was more important to help his senior guard and co-captain deal with his grief by playing.

Over on the other bench, though, Rohlman wasn’t so willing to take them. He told the referees to forget the technical and just let Franklin play.

“I could hear them arguing for five to seven minutes, saying, `We’re not taking it, we’re not taking it,” Womack said. “The refs told them, no, that’s the rule. You have to take them.”

That’s when Rohlman asked for volunteers, and McNeal’s hand went up.

He went alone to the free throw line, dribbled the ball a couple of times, and looked at the rim.

His first attempt went about two feet, bouncing a couple of times as it rolled toward the end line. The second barely left his hand.

It didn’t take long for the Milwaukee players to figure out what was going on.

They stood and turned toward the DeKalb bench and started applauding the gesture of sportsmanship. Soon, so did everybody in the stands.

“I did it for the guy who lost his mom,” McNeal told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. “It was the right thing to do.”

They may not remember our record 20 years from now, but they’ll remember what happened in that gym that night – the life lesson Dave Rohlman, head coach of the opposing DeKalb team on what his players will take away from this experience.
Franklin would go on to score 10 points, and Milwaukee Madison broke open the game in the second half to win 62-47. Afterward, the teams went out for pizza, two players from each team sharing each pie.

Franklin stopped by briefly, thankful that his team was there for him.

“I got kind of emotional but it helped a lot just to play,” he said. “I felt like I had a lot of support out there.”

Carlitha Franklin’s funeral was last Friday, and the school turned out for her and her son. Cheerleaders came in uniform, and everyone from the principal and teachers to Johntel’s classmates were there.

“Even the cooks from school showed up,” Womack said. “It lets you know what kind of kid he is.”

“We maybe don’t have the best basketball players in the world but they go to class and take care of business,” Womack said. “We have a losing record but there’s life lessons going on, good ones.”

None so good, though, as the moment a team and a player decided there were more important things than winning and having good stats.

God bless you all.-thanks.

Yes, DeKalb would go home with a loss. But it was a trip they’ll never forget.

“This is something our kids will hold for a lifetime,” Rohlman said. “They may not remember our record 20 years from now, but they’ll remember what happened in that gym that night.”

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of Rivals High from Yahoo Sports.com and AP

Amid the grieving, a rare act of sportsmanship February 18, 2009.

highschool.rivals.com

Image basketball courtesy of Global Photo and i.chow.com

i.ehow.com/images/GlobalPhoto/basketball