“TLC +light+caring +chocolate 4 dementia”

Like the old TV show said give me the simple life, Beatitudes in Phoenix, AZ. allows its patients like Ms. Nance, 96, afflicted with Alzheimer’s, “to sleep, be bathed and dine whenever she wants, even at 2 a.m. She could eat anything, too, no matter how unhealthy, including unlimited chocolate.
And she was given a baby doll, a move that seemed so jarring that a supervisor initially objected until she saw how calm Ms. Nance became when she rocked, caressed and fed her “baby,” often agreeing to eat herself after the doll “ate” several spoonfuls.
Dementia patients at Beatitudes are allowed practically anything that brings comfort, even an alcoholic “nip at night,” said Tena Alonzo, director of research. “Whatever your vice is, we’re your folks,” she said.
Once, Ms. Alonzo said: “The state tried to cite us for having chocolate on the nursing chart. They were like, ‘It’s not a medication.’ Yes, it is. It’s better than Xanax.”
It is an unusual posture for a nursing home, but Beatitudes is actually following some of the latest science. Research suggests that creating positive emotional experiences for Alzheimer’s patients diminishes distress and behavior problems.”

In desperation medical people are trying many different non-drug approaches to their care.There is no effective medical treatment for Alzheimer’s yet, most dementia therapy is the care giving performed by families and nursing homes. Some 11 million people care for Alzheimer’s-afflicted relatives at home. In nursing homes, two-thirds of residents have some dementia.
Caregiving support training a priority

Caregiving is considered so crucial that several federal and state agencies, including the Department of Veterans Affairs, are adopting research-tested programs to support and train caregivers. This month, the Senate Special Committee on Aging held a forum about Alzheimer’s care giving.
“There’s actually better evidence and more significant results in caregiver interventions than there is in anything to treat this disease so far,” said Lisa P. Gwyther, education director for the Bryan Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Duke University.
The National Institute on Aging and the Administration on Aging are now financing caregiving studies on “things that just kind of make the life of an Alzheimer’s patient and his or her caregiver less burdensome,” said Sidney M. Stahl, chief of the Individual Behavioral Processes branch of the Institute on Aging.

Techniques include using food, scheduling, art, music and exercise to generate positive emotions; engaging patients in activities that salvage fragments of their skills; and helping caregivers be more accepting and competent.

Caregiving at Beatitudes in Phoenix, AZ. takes on a wholistic individualized tender loving care, hopefully more organizations and institutions will follow this model.

Resources

Excerpts and Image courtesy of   http://nyti.ms/egVcG1

“Trauma or peace -a New Year’s wish”

Collectively, in the years ‘ past we humans have tried their best to collectively destroying Mother Nature and ourselves.

Let us begin this New Year 2011 with peace in our hearts. Armed with tools of improvement of our own health and wellness and with tested methods and techniques to de-stress ourselves and clarify our purpose of wholistically and sustainably healing the planet.

In our past we have ripped, dug, torn, bombed,slashed and burned other people, poisoned, abused  and corrupted our children and the earth, air and waters of the world.
This has caused a vibration of PTSD or post traumatic shock and stress to be our way of life.
Let us begin today to building positive support from each person and our earth by do just a little bit each day to help improve our food, relationships and well-being and our beloved earth.
May peace, respect, health and good will be generously bestowed on your  and yours in 2011.

Mary Wolken, PhD. and the Staff of Complementary Medicine Association

Image courtesy of   http://bit.ly/h8GYsc

“Face to face match made by angels”

A perfect match.

Anna Kasper, who took care of nursing home patients, delivered pizza and cleaned offices, had a warm giving personality.

Recipient of first full face transplanta down-to-earth goodness, a love of life, a spirit of giving.

Connie Culp, (Seen on the right.) who waited tables and painted restaurants and shared her time and good will with people before a tragedy nearly took her life. Connie has became the recipient of the first successful near-total face transplant in the United States.

She rose above life’s challenges, and kept her sense of humor no matter how rough things got. This gift has helped her recover.

In a groundbreaking transplant Cleveland Clinic doctors performed a face transplant in 2008.
Anna Kasper’s family made the announcement to give Anna her place in medical history.

Connie’s life after her surgery.
“Connie’s like Anna in a lot of ways,” says Ron Kasper, Anna’s husband, “…enjoyes life, smiles lots and has a great attitude even after everything she’s been through.
Saturday the two families met for the first time.
It was great how much the two clans had in common.

Both are very nice people.
Ron and his son remodel homes and paint for a living.
Connie Culp and her husband had a painting business and remodeled their home together.
The Kaspers had a grandchild who was about a year old at the time of the transplant.
Connie did, too.
The two women were born 14 months apart.
Their skin color is incredibly similar.
Their blood type, identical.

It was Ron and the couple’s three children who agreed to donate Anna’s face back in December 2008, the day after Anna collapsed and died on her back porch.

Their son, Ronald, now 21, found Anna slumped over at the bottom of the back steps she was purple. Paramedics revived her on the way to Lakewood Hospital, but tests showed what the family already knew. The 44-year-old woman was brain dead.

The family folowed Anna’s wishes.
In life she shared her time, money and many things with other people. In death her organs and  tissues continue to give life to others.
However, no one was prepared for the call from a specialist from the Cleveland Clinic, who called the house to ask for Anna’s face.  The family only took minutes to agree.

Anna wished to be cremated, so there wasn’t going to be an open casket. And that Anna was already an organ donor and her face bones, muscles and other tissues were a perfect match. This was a miracle in itself.

“But the overriding factor was we knew it was what Anna would’ve wanted,” says Ron, his voice breaking as he fights back tears.
“My mom would say, ‘Hell if I can’t use it and somebody else can, they can have it,’ ” Becky says.

No doubt Connie needed a face. In 2004 her common-law husband shot her in in the face, Connie was so disfigured, children ran from her and called her a monster.
Her nose was missing. So was her right eye, her lower eyelids, her upper lip, her top teeth. She had to breathe through a hole in her throat and eat through a tube. Most of her vision was gone.

On Dec. 10, 2008, surgeons at the Cleveland Clinic spent 23 hours removing skin and muscle, veins and arteries, teeth and bone from Anna and sewing them onto what remained of Connie Culp’s face, surgery that changed her life.

Connie, 47, has been thanking her donor from the moment she stepped out on the public stage in 2009, never able to name her because she didn’t know who she was.
Today she can.

Neil Lantzy, Cleveland ClinicBecky Kasper hugs Connie Culp after meeting her for the first time Saturday. Becky, her brother, sister and father agreed to donate her mother’s face to Connie after Anna Kasper died of a heart attack.
Connie doesn’t look like Anna because their bone structure is different.
“But I can definitely see the resemblance in the nose,” Becky says. “I know she’s smiling down on this, that she’s very happy.”

More than 50 people benefited from Anna’s donated organs and tissue.

People Helping People

Resources
Excerpts and Images courtesy of  html  http://bit.ly/fGS51P

“Save lives before you die”

More than 109,698 men, women and children currently need life-saving organ transplants.

Active transplant candidates as of today 72,341.

Check latest stats here

  • Every 10 minutes another name is added to the national organ transplant waiting list.
  • An average of 18 people die each day from the lack of available organs for transplant.
  • In 2009, there were 8,021 deceased organ donors and 6,610 living organ donors resulting in 28,465 organ transplants.
  • Last year, more than 42,000 grafts were made available for transplant by eye banks within the United States.

Two types of donor gifts -Living (organ and tissue) and End of Life

It is becoming more common to donate organs and partial organs and tissues while alive. Kidneys are the most common organ donated by living donors. Other organs that can be donated include a lobe of a lung, partial liver, pancreas or intestine.

Although the decision to become a living donor involves careful consideration, being a living donor offers others an alternative to waiting on the national transplant waiting list for an organ from a deceased donor.

Resources
Excerpts
courtesy of  http://bit.ly/9N2hW5
Excerpts courtesy of  http://bit.ly/bjJiEi

“The biggest win for these lottery winners”

As the Beatles song goes “Money can’t buy me love”.  Canadian lottery winners Allen and Violet Large have decided that these large winnings are a headache. Their hearts are Larger than their winnings.

it brought them anxiety over the prospect that “crooked people” might take advantage of them. Several people called them out of the blue to ask for money when the news first broke that they’d won the jackpot. So they began an $11 million donation spree to get rid of it and help others, the Chronicle Herald reports:

They took care of family first and then began delivering donations to the two pages’ worth of groups they had decided on, including the local fire department, churches, cemeteries, the Red Cross, the Salvation Army, hospitals in Truro and Halifax, where Violet underwent her cancer treatment, and organizations that fight cancer, Alzheimer’s and diabetes. Those are just a few groups that have benefited by their good fortune and good will.

Great examples of how just one or two people can potentially make life long improvements in their community and the lives of so many.
They kept  only 2 percent of the money for a rainy day.


Why?

“It made us feel good,” said Violet “and so much good being done with that money.””That money that we won was nothing,” her tearful husband, Allen, told Patricia Brooks Arenburg of the Nova Scotia Chronicle Herald. “We have each other.”

They have not spent one cent on ourselves because they have been too busy getting everything looked. Their other main focus is Violet’s heath.

As Violet says, “We live in the country and we’re proud of it. Money can’t buy you health or happiness.”

Resource

Excerpts and Image courtesy of    http://yhoo.it/9HAhDS

“Baby falls into dr. arms”

If ever the winds of fate, the blessing of the heavens, good luck -call it what you like, but this is one very blessed child.

A French good Samaritan saved a Parisian toddler from certain death this week. The toddler fell from a seventh story apartment window into the arms of a stranger below. This stranger is a medical doctor and was alerted to the fall by his son.

Thanks and praise goes out to the doctor and his son for saving the child’s life. The little girl was playing unattended with her siblings when she fell out the window.

After a checkup at the local northern Paris city hospital, she was released. Amazingly, she did not even get a scratch!

Resource

Excerpts courtesy of   http://aol.it/dxCgdj


“The traveling bottle mandolin will you be the next to play it?

The Journey of the Peoples Mandolin
Visit the blog at drtombibey.wordpress.com
This is one very cool doc. He claims to only be an old country doc, but he is a bluegrass music man from way back . Dr. B has his patients call him has even had the same staff for 40 years!
But his love of the mandolin and bluegrass are only superceeded by his medical mystery writing ability.
I must  say his new medical mystery book The Mandolin Case kept me entertained on my last training trip. It was hard to put down at night.
But back to this story, the Mandolin’s Journey.

Sending out his beloved mandolin is his version of being a dreamer, paying it forward. The bottle shaped mandolin is free floating in the universe. Not knowing whose hands would enjoy it next or who would wind up with it. It is on a five year journey and is scheduled to return to MerleFest in 2015.

When it returns ( in good shape), Gabrielle Gray at the International Bluegrass Music Museum (www.bluegrass-museum.org ) plans to put it there as an exhibit. it belongs to the people. It is scheduled to return to MerleFest in 2015.

If you are one of the lucky ones that receive the mandolin, Dr. B asks that you send in your documentation, Any who receives the bottle shaped mandolin would put on its case  a regional sticker  to promote your geographic area or your favorite band.Then e-mail him at tom.bibey@yahoo.com with you-tube links or pictures.  He’ll post them here on the website or on hisblog (drtombibey.wordpress.com) to document the mandolin’s travels. If my mandolin shows up at your favorite festival maybe a picture of you holding it beside a banner to promote your event would help your cause.

Send in your documentation; your images might end up being part of the permanent display in the Museum.

You can read more on this at drtombibey.wordpress.com .

Next post Dr. B’s “The Madolin Case”.

Y’all watch for The People’s Mandolin at a venue near you.

“Life line to Southern Az schools -Tools for Schools”

World Care and our efforts in providing humanitarian assistance to the local community and abroad. Here are a few World Care updates.

Tools for Schools 2010 -People Helping People

World Care, Tucson, Arizona has  provided disadvantaged Southern Arizona students and financially strapped teachers with the supplies necessary to begin a successful school year.
World Care Teacher Days allowed teachers from multiple districts to request school supplies for their classrooms and pick them up at our headquarters.  138 teachers received school packs, alleviating the need for them to purchase supplies with their own money, which has become a common problem in education during this financial crisis.

School administrators also utilized Tools for Schools to gain materials for all of their teachers and students.  1,939 pounds of supplies were picked up by principals to be given to teachers and students at their schools.  In addition to the supplies donated to teachers, World Care also assembled student school packs.  The supplies were organized at our headquartersand 199 pounds were distributed to students grades K-12.

In July and August, World Care also donated 67 refurbished computers to schools and low income students.

Tools For Schools has supplied this year:

School Pack Recipients:
139 teachers
74 schools
5,000 students

Total= 3,772 lbs.

Thanks World Care for your continued support of people in crisis whether in ‘AZ or the world.

"Work as a team? = Progress in Alzheimer’s research"

What was that word you used?

My Mother always taught us to share, care and respectfully work together. She said that there is strength in number.

Seems that this is true in medical research as well.  Yes, in the land where no one shared data unless they were close trusted collegues.  Sometimes necessity and the overwhelming enormity of the project creates the perfect opportunity to do as mother taught us so many years ago. Continue reading “"Work as a team? = Progress in Alzheimer’s research"”