“Change your burned skin – change your life”

Gunning for success

Burn care and healing has been fraught with extreem pain and long crueling amounts of time to heal. Now the prayers have been answered with a gun. Until now burns have usually been treated with skin grafts, which involve taking skin sections from uninjured parts of the patient’s body, or growing sheets of skin artificially, and grafting them over the burn. The grafts can take several weeks or even months to heal, and during the recovery period patients are prone to infections because of the damage to the skin, which is the body’s first line of defense against pathogens.
Scientists have been able to regenerate skin in the laboratory for decades, but the process takes two to three weeks and the sheets of skin produced are fragile. When grafted on, blisters can form beneath it due to secretions, and can push up against the sheet and damage it. Scaring scars lives.

Enter the Skin-cell Gun

The skin sprayer works like a very high tech paint spray gun. Originally developed by Professor Joerg C. Gerlach and colleages of the Department of Surgery at the University of Pittsburg’s McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

Skin spraying have been in use  in Australia, where Dr Fiona Wood of the West Australia Burns Unit developed a method called “spray-on-skin.” Dr Wood’s method uses an aerosol system to spray on cultured skin cells.

This system also cuts healing time to days rather than weeks or months, and the technique substantially cut the death toll in the Bali bombings in 2002.

Dr Gerlach said the new method uses an electronically controlled pneumatic device that does not injure the cells, while the other skin spraying devices are hand-pumped atomizers.
In a process taking only an hour and a half in total, a biopsy is taken from the patient’s undamaged skin and then healthy stem cells are isolated from the biopsy and an aqueous solution containing the cells is sprayed on the burn.
The sprayed wound is then covered with a newly-developed dressing with tubes enmeshed within it and extending from each end. One set of tubes functions as an artery, while the second set functions as a vein. The tubes are connected to an “artificial vascular system” and provide electrolytes, antibiotics, amino acids and glucose to the wound. The dressing keeps the wound clean and sterile, and provides nutrition for the skin stem cells to encourage them to regenerate new skin.
After treatment the wound heals in just days, when it would have taken weeks to heal using traditional treatments. Dr Gerlach said patients had been treated at the Berlin Burn Center and they had regrown skin over a burned ear or an entire face in only a few days.

At the moment the technique can only be used on second-degree burns, but Dr Gerlach hopes it will later be able to tackle third-degree burns as well.
The research is funded by the US Department of Defense under the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine (AFIRM) consortium of research institutions, which was formed in 2008 to research better treatments for wounded service personnel.
The Skin-cell Gun was shown on the National Geographic channel in the episode Explorer: How to Build a Beating Heart, which looks at the latest tissue regeneration techniques.
More information

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Excerpts and Image courtesy of http://bit.ly/excILy

Country doctoring- Virginia there still is a Santa Claus

Long thought extinct from the American health care frontier one has been found alive and serving his rural patients -a dedicated doctor that make house calls. One has been loving his work for 50 years!

In Yoakum, Texas a sleepy country town, that sprang up around a railroad junction  folks knows Doc Watson.

Over the last 50 years, this tall and lanky family general practitioner welcomed many of the town’s citizens and doctored most of the others.

“I never wanted to be anything other than a family doctor,” Watson said as he sat in the hospital cafeteria on a recent December day. Pork chops and chicken fried steak (“good home cooking,” noted Watson) were on the menu, a reminder of the small-town atmosphere that drew the Baylor College of Medicine graduate to Yoakum in 1958.

The frayed and stained  doctor’s bag he brought with him is marked by the scars of countless moments of birth, death and recovery. Over the years he has served several generations of patients in this town of 6,000 about 100 miles east of San Antonio.

He began his practice charging $3 for office visits and $5 for house calls, but he often accepted other kinds of payment including homemade pies, fresh vegetables, deer meat and sausages. One grateful patient gave Watson, a hardcore golfer, one of her husband’s old 2-irons. It still sits in a corner of his office.

“He’s always right there when you need him,” said Karen Barber, CEO of the Yoakum Community Hospital, where a wing is named after Watson. “There’s never a second thought for him. He just does what needs to be done.”
The night Janet Jaco’s little girl had to be rushed to the hospital with a sudden hemorrhage, David Watson walked the four blocks from his house to the Yoakum Community Hospital every hour on the hour to check on his patient and offer a comforting shoulder to her worried mother.

The night the hospital urgently needed blood for an obstetrics patient, Watson rushed down from his office to donate some of his O-negative, then stayed to call in other townspeople with the right blood type. (He knew who they were.)

Flooded roads  did not stop him on night  from getting to an ailing neighbor; he simply jumped on the tractor, put one arm around the driver and  the other held his worn leather doctor’s bag as they went to the hospital.

Dr. Watson received the Country Doctor of the Year award this month. The honors is awarded annual to a primary care physician who best exemplifies the spirit of rural practitioners.

At 78, he still sees up to 30 patients a day at the Yoakum Medical Clinic, the office where he has worked for half a century. He visits another 30 patients during daily rounds at the hospital and a local nursing home, treats children at the Bluebonnet Youth Ranch and continues to make house calls.

Love what you do -do it to the best of your abilities and the world will be a better place for you having walked and served here.

Thanks Dr. Watson for your dedicated loving service.

Yes Virginia the spirit of Christmas lives on every day through loving dedicated people.

Resources

Country Doctor of Year: 50 years of house calls

–  MONICA RHOR, AP Dec 29, 2008. as reported in YahooNews http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081229/ap_on_re_us/country_doc;_ylt=Assc

Video http://www.breitbart.com/image.php?id=app-0a97c0ec-962d-440d-b410-864d8e3852cd&show_article=1&catnum=0&ch=BNImagesAll:

7 Steps to Trust Building and Client Evaluation – The Art of Listening

Posted on May 13, 2008.

Assessing the integrative health needs of the person over the phone the art of listening.

Making harmonious choices to help support someone grows physically, mentally and emotionally began in a simple way. The best experience of my life came the day I was privileged to have my first homeopathic interview. I felt like I was being listened to at all levels of my being for the first time in my life. I never realized how important truly being listening to from the heart really is. This consultation changed my life. I always knew that my life would be spent helping others to help themselves in a natural holistic manner. I’ve been perfecting listening skills ever since. There is an art and a science to learning to listen to another human under stress. It doesn’t matter the age of the person seeking your coaching or counseling the steps are the same. Listening is a skill that takes time, modeling and sensitivity.

1. The art of listening is development of a calm sensitivity to the person without emotionally identifying with them. Developing any skill takes time and practice, Caution: If the person needing your help has a problem that is similar to an issue from your own emotional history you must be vigilant. If you find yourself getting emotionally involved on any level, you need to do something to regain perspective. Like taking a drink, excusing yourself and leaving the room for a bit and doing some deep breathing. You can then resume the session with an objective perspective.

2. Listen to them. Is this a medical emergency and the person needs to go to ER or the situation the person is in dangerous to them or others?

3. If not a medical emergency, being straight forward and to the point is important. Ask little and listen to the person’s story. The thoroughness of the history depends on the urgency of the situation.

4. Do they have a history of wanting everything done for them, take pills, no diet changes blaming and being codependent, attitude.

5. Asking questions. You can ask an open-ended question that allows them to open up and feel comfortable with you. When the information slows Ask a good leading questions. Repeat what you hear then find out frequency of the problem, how other parts of the body systems are doing. Any surgeries for what, any medications, allergies, traumas like broken bones, accidents, early childhood history and family relationships.

6. Some times what the person doesn’t say is more important than what they relate to you. Listening to the change in tone , speed and hesitancy. Is this an old issue or involved with other health and emotional crises.

7. Patient expectations -honesty-quick fix Assessment leads to determining options for this individual. Options may be determined by priorities of client-trust levels, money, time and commitment to getting involved and helping themselves.

Assessing the integrative health needs of the person over the phone the art of listening. For more information on developing compassionate and trusting client relations and ways to be calm while your treading through life

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