“Lavender oil destroys fungal infections”

Fungi are increasingly resistant to drugs. It is urgent to explore alternatives to combat fungal infections.  Lavender (Lavendula) is an herbal plant whose essential oil have been used for centuries to heal skin tissue from burns, often used as a mild antidepressant and for its anticeptic qualities and as an exotic edible condiment. Finally modern western medical research is being forced to study how it works for its significant clinical benefits.

Lavender oil derived from pressing the leaves and distilling the essence from the volatile oils could be used to combat the increasing incidence of antifungal-resistant infections, according to a study published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology.

The essential oil shows a potent antifungal effect against strains of fungi responsible for common skin and nail infections.

 

Scientists from the University of Coimbra in Portugal distilled lavender oil from the Lavandula viridis L’Her shrub that grows in southern Portugal. The oil was tested against a range of pathogenic fungi and was found to be lethal to a range of skin-pathogenic strains, known as dermatophytes, as well as various species of Candida.
Dermatophytes cause infections of the skin, hair and nails as they use the keratin within these tissues to obtain nutrients. They are responsible for conditions such as Athletes’ foot, ringworm and can also lead to scalp and nail infections.
Candida species coexist with most healthy individuals without causing problems but may cause mucocutaneous candidosis – or thrush – in some people. In immunocompromised patients, Candida species are able to cause serious infection if the fungal cells escape into the blood stream.
Currently, there are relatively few types of antifungal drugs to treat infections and those that are available often have side effects. Professor Ligia Salgueiro and Professor Eugenia Pinto who led this study explained why novel fungicides are urgently needed.
“In the last few years there has been an increase in the incidence of fungal diseases, particularly among immunocompromised patients,” they said.
“Unfortunately there is also increasing resistance to antifungal drugs. Research by our group and others has shown that essential oils may be cheap, efficient alternatives that have minimal side effects.”
Essential oils distilled from the Lavandula genus of lavender plants are already used widely, particularly in the food, perfume and cosmetic industries. Studies of the biological activities of these oils suggest Lavandula oils have sedative and antispasmodic properties as well being potent antimicrobials and antioxidants.

This group has demonstrated that these oils work by destroying fungal cells by damaging the cell membrane. They believe that further research into the mechanisms by which this essential oil works could have significant clinical benefits.

“Lavandula oil shows wide-spectrum antifungal activity and is highly potent. This is a good starting point for developing this oil for clinical use to manage fungal infections. What is now required is clinical trials to evaluate how our in vitro work translates in vivo,” said Professor Salgueiro.

This group has demonstrated that these oils work by destroying fungal cells by damaging the cell membrane. They believe that further research into the mechanisms by

Other uses for lavender include lavender oil used for inhalation therapy to treat headaches, nervous disorders, and exhaustion. Herbalists treat skin ailments, such as fungal infections (like candidiasis), wounds, eczema, and acne, with lavender oil. It is also used in a healing bath for joint and muscle pain. One study evaluating treatments for children with eczema founded it was therapeutic touch from the mother that improved symptoms; in other words, massage with and without essential oils (including lavender) both reduced the dry, scaly skin lesions. Another study found that lavender oil may improve pain control after surgery. Fifty patients undergoing breast biopsy surgery received either oxygen supplemented with lavender oil or oxygen alone. Patients in the lavender group reported better pain control than patients in the control group.

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Diabetic help from a peppery spice

Are you familiar with the pungent peppery West African spice known as grains of paradise or scientifically as Aframomum melegueta? It is a member of the ginger family that grows well in the swamps along the coast.

In African folklore medicine grains of paradise is used as a digestive aid. Today scientists are testing and hoping that an extract from this plant will become the newest diabetic medicine.

Raskin a Rutgers scientist says the extract could help to prevent the onset of diabetes in people at high risk and could be given prophylactically to individuals who have a family history of diabetes, or have other risk factors for developing such disease.

Diabetes spice -Justin Mullins NewScientist.com October 29, 2008

Comment: Why not work with American plants that have historical been used in the southwestern US to help control blood sugar problems like agave, cinnamon, tumeric and prickly pear?