“A wish for you”


A  Beautiful Parable  








LIFE ISN’T ABOUT WAITING FOR THE STORM TO PASS…
IT’S LEARNING HOW TO DANCE IN THE  RAIN !  We cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust our sails. May love and all that goes with it be yours. 
 
 Submitted by Mary S. Tucson AZ
Author unknown
 

“13 Best wishes and smiles for 2011”

Throughout the rest of this 2011 and beyond Complementary Medicine Association wishes you and those you love:

May you always make the right moves.

May your cup runneth over with love.

May you always find shelter from any storm.

May you remain good looking and looking good!

May you find the perfect diet for your soul.
(If this face doesn’t make you want to stop eating sausage, nothing will.)

May you find perfect balance in the company you keep.

May you have as much fun as you can before someone makes you stop.

May the worst thing that happens to you come in slobbery pink and furry tan.

May you manage to make time for siesta.

May all the new folks you meet be interesting and kind.

May your accessories always harmonize with your natural beauty!

Should your mouth be bigger than your stomach, may you have a chewing good time!



And may your friends always bring you comfort!

May You Have a Joy filled NEW YEAR
Overflowing with Compassion, Prosperity, Health And Hope

Images courtesy of a friend of NaturesCrusaders.com library

“Most memorable lacrosse game of their lives”

As reported by sports columnist George Diaz at OrlandoSentinel.com, the Winter Springs girls lacrosse team played a special scrimmage at halftime of the Winter Springs junior varsity football game on Wednesday night. The Bears varsity squad challenged their JV counterparts in an off season special half time exibition.

What was the special occasion for this scrimmage months out of season on short notice? There was one special spectator at the game, Carl Defoe, a middle-aged man devoid of body hair after five rounds of chemotherapy, cheering on his daughter for the first — and in all likelihood, the last — time in his life.

Defoe is dying of lung cancer, and he knows that he doesn’t have much time left — six weeks, eight weeks, maybe more. The  cancer has spread from his one remaining lung to his brain stem and spinal cord. While Defoe insists that he isn’t done fighting the disease yet, the one thing that left him most anguished was knowing he’d never get to see his daughter, Heather, play in a high school lacrosse game.

Somehow the Winter Springs High School administration heard about Defoe’s last wish. The school quickly sprung into action, contacting the notoriously rigid Florida High School Activities Association to ask for special approval to hold a one-time, out-of-season lacrosse scrimmage. Amazingly, the FHSAA approved the request almost instantly, with one condition: They wanted a photo from the game.

So, on Wednesday, at halftime of the Winter Springs junior varsity football game against Oviedo High School, the two girls lacrosse squads faced off in a brisk, seven-minute scrimmage. Heather Defoe played for the varsity squad instead of the junior varsity team she’s scheduled to play with this spring … and she scored three goals.

Then, when it was all over, the two teams gathered around a happy man in a wheelchair, posed for cameras and the whole special event was gone, over as quickly as it had come.

Gone, but not forgotten by anyone there, not least of all Carl himself. If there were ever questions of whether sports can change a person’s outlook on life, they should be quieted by what Carl Defoe told Diaz just after the scrimmage wrapped up.

“I feel lucky,” Defoe said.

People Helping People make a better world. -Thank you George Diaz for these touching story.

"Your life has a ripple effect "

You are so special.

Never has there been or will there ever be someone just like you again.

Unknowing your every thought, word, action and reaction causes all other living beings to react.

Keep your thoughts about your self and others high to increase your healthy energy footprint on this earth.

Each life has countless effects on others.

Thanks to Humanity Healing and Youtube for this beautiful video presentation.

Click here to watch the “The Ripple Effect: The Heartbeat to Eternity”

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Changing the lives of The Invisible Children of Uganda

In the spring of 2003, three young Americans Jason Russell, Bobby Bailey and Laren Poole ages 24, 21 and 19 traveled to Africa in search of a story to capture on video. What they found was a tragedy that disgusted and inspired them. They story they found changed their lives and many others lives forever.

Producers of Invisible Children Movie
Producers of Invisible Children Movie

This is a documentary of the children of war involving weapons, abductions and abuse. The children are the victims. The “Invisible Children: rough cut” film exposes the effects of a 20 year-long war on the children of Northern Uganda. These children live in fear of abduction by rebel soldiers, and are being forced to fight as a part of violent army. It is sad, but hopeful.

You too can make a difference one person at a time.

Thanks guys for your heart felt work.

See this film, you will be forever change

The Invisible Children

Resource
Video courtesy of video.google.com/videoplayinvisible+children
Image courtesy of Invisiblechildren.com/media/whoWeAre/key_image.jpg

People helping people: Wanting only a handshake gets whole USA team

RED White And Blue true

American flag with eagle
American flag with eagle

In a quiet area of Florida the American flag carrying some extra good vibes today. This American flag traveled around the world and through the deserts of Afghanistan and Iraq. 27 year old Sgt. Felix Perez brought it from home as a reminder of what he was fighting for and for good luck. His flag never left his Army backpack through every mission he carried it- a little part of the homeland he loves.
When Sgt.Perez came home he went to the Dolphin Stadium on March 17, 2009. He wanted to bring something lucky with him to help Team USA win this must-win World Baseball Classic game against Puerto Rico. Perez wore a Team USA hat and a Team USA hoodie, and his little sister, Jessica, draped his flag across her shoulders. The United States’ 6-5 come-from-behind victory in the ninth inning sent them into a frenzy. She danced around. He sat in his motorized wheelchair and roared.

It was such a sweet victory maybe his flag and therir outfits helped. On the way out of the stadium, Perez placed his flag in his lap and leaned over to a security guard manning Gate G. He was hoping maybe just maybe a player, some players dare he hope that some players from Team USA might sign it.? The security guard led Perez and his sister to the U.S. clubhouse. They waited while our American flag went inside.

“The next thing I know,” Perez said, “I’m getting called to come back in there.”

And so began the coolest 30 minutes of Felix Perez’s life to date. On an evening when he felt especially proud to be an America, his favorite team the undogs of the sporting event, but his sporting heroes, dressed in red, white and blue invited Perez in. There he found himself surrounded by them, doused with celebratory Miller Lites, with the American flag that was with him during the worst moment of his life passed around the room and signed by every player on the team.

This very special American flag now carried the collective thanks and admiration from his team and all of us in USA that are proud to be an American.

Resources

Red, white and blue, through and through– Jeff Passan, Yahoo! Sports
Image American Flag courtesy of.bing.com/images/American+Flag&R5FD

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Rarified sportmanship -people helping people

There were no other options for this coach. It didn’t matter that his DeKalb, Ill., High School basketball team had ridden a bus two and a half hours to get to Milwaukee, then waited another hour past game time to play. Didn’t matter that the game was close, or that this was a chance to beat a big city team.

Johntel Franklin scored 10 points in the game following the loss of his mother.
Something else was on Dave Rohlman’s mind when he asked for a volunteer to shoot two free throws awarded his team on a technical foul in the second quarter. His senior captain raised his hand, ready to go to the line as he had many times before.

Only this time it was different.

“You realize you’re going to miss them, don’t you?” Rohlman said.

Darius McNeal nodded his head. He understood what had to be done.

The Barbs were playing a non-conference game on the road against Milwaukee Madison. It was the third meeting between the two schools.
The teams planned to get together after the game and share some pizzas and basketball-main_fullsoda. But the game itself between these friendly rivals almost never took place.

Hours earlier, the mother of Milwaukee Madison senior captain Johntel Franklin died at a local hospital. Carlitha Franklin in remission from five-year fight with cervical cancer hemorrhaged suddenly while Johntel was taking his college ACT exam.

Johntel and a few teammates were at the hospital late that afternoon when the life-support system was removed. His mom Carlitha was just 39 years old.

“She was young and they were real close,” said Milwaukee coach Aaron Womack Jr., who was at the hospital. “He was very distraught and it happened so suddenly he didn’t have time to grieve.”

Womack was going to cancel the game, but Franklin told him he wanted the team to play. And play they did, even though the game started late and Milwaukee Madison dressed only eight players.

Early in the second quarter, Womack saw someone out of the corner of his eye. It was Franklin, who came there directly from the hospital to root his teammates on.

The Knights had possession, so Womack called a time out. His players went over and hugged their grieving teammate. Fans came out of the stands to do the same.

“We got back to playing the game and I asked if he wanted to come and sit on the bench,” Womack said during a telephone interview.

“No,” Franklin replied. “I want to play.”

There was just one problem. Since Franklin wasn’t on the pre-game roster, putting him in meant drawing a technical foul that would give DeKalb two free throws.

Though it was a tight game, Womack was willing to give up the two points. It was more important to help his senior guard and co-captain deal with his grief by playing.

Over on the other bench, though, Rohlman wasn’t so willing to take them. He told the referees to forget the technical and just let Franklin play.

“I could hear them arguing for five to seven minutes, saying, `We’re not taking it, we’re not taking it,” Womack said. “The refs told them, no, that’s the rule. You have to take them.”

That’s when Rohlman asked for volunteers, and McNeal’s hand went up.

He went alone to the free throw line, dribbled the ball a couple of times, and looked at the rim.

His first attempt went about two feet, bouncing a couple of times as it rolled toward the end line. The second barely left his hand.

It didn’t take long for the Milwaukee players to figure out what was going on.

They stood and turned toward the DeKalb bench and started applauding the gesture of sportsmanship. Soon, so did everybody in the stands.

“I did it for the guy who lost his mom,” McNeal told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. “It was the right thing to do.”

They may not remember our record 20 years from now, but they’ll remember what happened in that gym that night – the life lesson Dave Rohlman, head coach of the opposing DeKalb team on what his players will take away from this experience.
Franklin would go on to score 10 points, and Milwaukee Madison broke open the game in the second half to win 62-47. Afterward, the teams went out for pizza, two players from each team sharing each pie.

Franklin stopped by briefly, thankful that his team was there for him.

“I got kind of emotional but it helped a lot just to play,” he said. “I felt like I had a lot of support out there.”

Carlitha Franklin’s funeral was last Friday, and the school turned out for her and her son. Cheerleaders came in uniform, and everyone from the principal and teachers to Johntel’s classmates were there.

“Even the cooks from school showed up,” Womack said. “It lets you know what kind of kid he is.”

“We maybe don’t have the best basketball players in the world but they go to class and take care of business,” Womack said. “We have a losing record but there’s life lessons going on, good ones.”

None so good, though, as the moment a team and a player decided there were more important things than winning and having good stats.

God bless you all.-thanks.

Yes, DeKalb would go home with a loss. But it was a trip they’ll never forget.

“This is something our kids will hold for a lifetime,” Rohlman said. “They may not remember our record 20 years from now, but they’ll remember what happened in that gym that night.”

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of Rivals High from Yahoo Sports.com and AP

Amid the grieving, a rare act of sportsmanship February 18, 2009.

highschool.rivals.com

Image basketball courtesy of Global Photo and i.chow.com

i.ehow.com/images/GlobalPhoto/basketball

Country doctoring- Virginia there still is a Santa Claus

Long thought extinct from the American health care frontier one has been found alive and serving his rural patients -a dedicated doctor that make house calls. One has been loving his work for 50 years!

In Yoakum, Texas a sleepy country town, that sprang up around a railroad junction  folks knows Doc Watson.

Over the last 50 years, this tall and lanky family general practitioner welcomed many of the town’s citizens and doctored most of the others.

“I never wanted to be anything other than a family doctor,” Watson said as he sat in the hospital cafeteria on a recent December day. Pork chops and chicken fried steak (“good home cooking,” noted Watson) were on the menu, a reminder of the small-town atmosphere that drew the Baylor College of Medicine graduate to Yoakum in 1958.

The frayed and stained  doctor’s bag he brought with him is marked by the scars of countless moments of birth, death and recovery. Over the years he has served several generations of patients in this town of 6,000 about 100 miles east of San Antonio.

He began his practice charging $3 for office visits and $5 for house calls, but he often accepted other kinds of payment including homemade pies, fresh vegetables, deer meat and sausages. One grateful patient gave Watson, a hardcore golfer, one of her husband’s old 2-irons. It still sits in a corner of his office.

“He’s always right there when you need him,” said Karen Barber, CEO of the Yoakum Community Hospital, where a wing is named after Watson. “There’s never a second thought for him. He just does what needs to be done.”
The night Janet Jaco’s little girl had to be rushed to the hospital with a sudden hemorrhage, David Watson walked the four blocks from his house to the Yoakum Community Hospital every hour on the hour to check on his patient and offer a comforting shoulder to her worried mother.

The night the hospital urgently needed blood for an obstetrics patient, Watson rushed down from his office to donate some of his O-negative, then stayed to call in other townspeople with the right blood type. (He knew who they were.)

Flooded roads  did not stop him on night  from getting to an ailing neighbor; he simply jumped on the tractor, put one arm around the driver and  the other held his worn leather doctor’s bag as they went to the hospital.

Dr. Watson received the Country Doctor of the Year award this month. The honors is awarded annual to a primary care physician who best exemplifies the spirit of rural practitioners.

At 78, he still sees up to 30 patients a day at the Yoakum Medical Clinic, the office where he has worked for half a century. He visits another 30 patients during daily rounds at the hospital and a local nursing home, treats children at the Bluebonnet Youth Ranch and continues to make house calls.

Love what you do -do it to the best of your abilities and the world will be a better place for you having walked and served here.

Thanks Dr. Watson for your dedicated loving service.

Yes Virginia the spirit of Christmas lives on every day through loving dedicated people.

Resources

Country Doctor of Year: 50 years of house calls

–  MONICA RHOR, AP Dec 29, 2008. as reported in YahooNews http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081229/ap_on_re_us/country_doc;_ylt=Assc

Video http://www.breitbart.com/image.php?id=app-0a97c0ec-962d-440d-b410-864d8e3852cd&show_article=1&catnum=0&ch=BNImagesAll: