Susan Boyle -Yes we can all make a difference

Never give up dreaming

47 Year old Susan Boyle shocked the judges with her performance in the auditions for Britains Got Talent, singing I dreamed a dream from Les Miserables.

Listen to Susan’s heavenly voice.

Here are the Lyrics (Thanks to NewHotdox)

I dreamed a dream in time gone by
When hope was high,
And life worth living
I dreamed that love would never die
I dreamed that God would be forgiving.

Then I was young and unafraid
When dreams were made and used,
And wasted
There was no ransom to be paid
No song unsung,
No wine untasted.

But the tigers come at night
With their voices soft as thunder
As they tear your hopes apart
As they turn your dreams to shame.

And still I dream he’ll come to me
And we will live our lives together
But there are dreams that cannot be
And there are storms
We cannot weather…

I had a dream my life would be
So different from this hell I’m living
So different now from what it seems
Now life has killed
The dream I dreamed.

Thanks you Susan for showing us that wonderful talents no no age or image and the joy of sharing your gift can be appreciated by all.

Resources

Listen to her heavenly voice: courtesy of Youtube.com

"Relax-where you want to go."

Another way people are helping people.

Take a break and relax.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0W0jTzDn-sw&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x006699&color2=0x54abd6&border=1]



Thanks Christian Tatonetti for your beautiful music!

Resources


Video courtesy of


The Firecrackers can -can you?

jumprope

Jumping rope /video can

Brighten your day and lighten your worries.

It will help keep you more youthful and healthful.

Before beginning on an exercise program, consult with your health practitioner.

Check out this video. Thanks Firecrackers putting a smile on so many peoples’ faces and inspiring all of us to be better at the simple things in life than we thought we could be.

Resources

Video courtesy of Blip.tv

Image courtesy of Acefitness.org

Animation courtesy of Animation Library – Jump Rope

People helping people: Wanting only a handshake gets whole USA team

RED White And Blue true

American flag with eagle
American flag with eagle

In a quiet area of Florida the American flag carrying some extra good vibes today. This American flag traveled around the world and through the deserts of Afghanistan and Iraq. 27 year old Sgt. Felix Perez brought it from home as a reminder of what he was fighting for and for good luck. His flag never left his Army backpack through every mission he carried it- a little part of the homeland he loves.
When Sgt.Perez came home he went to the Dolphin Stadium on March 17, 2009. He wanted to bring something lucky with him to help Team USA win this must-win World Baseball Classic game against Puerto Rico. Perez wore a Team USA hat and a Team USA hoodie, and his little sister, Jessica, draped his flag across her shoulders. The United States’ 6-5 come-from-behind victory in the ninth inning sent them into a frenzy. She danced around. He sat in his motorized wheelchair and roared.

It was such a sweet victory maybe his flag and therir outfits helped. On the way out of the stadium, Perez placed his flag in his lap and leaned over to a security guard manning Gate G. He was hoping maybe just maybe a player, some players dare he hope that some players from Team USA might sign it.? The security guard led Perez and his sister to the U.S. clubhouse. They waited while our American flag went inside.

“The next thing I know,” Perez said, “I’m getting called to come back in there.”

And so began the coolest 30 minutes of Felix Perez’s life to date. On an evening when he felt especially proud to be an America, his favorite team the undogs of the sporting event, but his sporting heroes, dressed in red, white and blue invited Perez in. There he found himself surrounded by them, doused with celebratory Miller Lites, with the American flag that was with him during the worst moment of his life passed around the room and signed by every player on the team.

This very special American flag now carried the collective thanks and admiration from his team and all of us in USA that are proud to be an American.

Resources

Red, white and blue, through and through– Jeff Passan, Yahoo! Sports
Image American Flag courtesy of.bing.com/images/American+Flag&R5FD

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Rarified sportmanship -people helping people

There were no other options for this coach. It didn’t matter that his DeKalb, Ill., High School basketball team had ridden a bus two and a half hours to get to Milwaukee, then waited another hour past game time to play. Didn’t matter that the game was close, or that this was a chance to beat a big city team.

Johntel Franklin scored 10 points in the game following the loss of his mother.
Something else was on Dave Rohlman’s mind when he asked for a volunteer to shoot two free throws awarded his team on a technical foul in the second quarter. His senior captain raised his hand, ready to go to the line as he had many times before.

Only this time it was different.

“You realize you’re going to miss them, don’t you?” Rohlman said.

Darius McNeal nodded his head. He understood what had to be done.

The Barbs were playing a non-conference game on the road against Milwaukee Madison. It was the third meeting between the two schools.
The teams planned to get together after the game and share some pizzas and basketball-main_fullsoda. But the game itself between these friendly rivals almost never took place.

Hours earlier, the mother of Milwaukee Madison senior captain Johntel Franklin died at a local hospital. Carlitha Franklin in remission from five-year fight with cervical cancer hemorrhaged suddenly while Johntel was taking his college ACT exam.

Johntel and a few teammates were at the hospital late that afternoon when the life-support system was removed. His mom Carlitha was just 39 years old.

“She was young and they were real close,” said Milwaukee coach Aaron Womack Jr., who was at the hospital. “He was very distraught and it happened so suddenly he didn’t have time to grieve.”

Womack was going to cancel the game, but Franklin told him he wanted the team to play. And play they did, even though the game started late and Milwaukee Madison dressed only eight players.

Early in the second quarter, Womack saw someone out of the corner of his eye. It was Franklin, who came there directly from the hospital to root his teammates on.

The Knights had possession, so Womack called a time out. His players went over and hugged their grieving teammate. Fans came out of the stands to do the same.

“We got back to playing the game and I asked if he wanted to come and sit on the bench,” Womack said during a telephone interview.

“No,” Franklin replied. “I want to play.”

There was just one problem. Since Franklin wasn’t on the pre-game roster, putting him in meant drawing a technical foul that would give DeKalb two free throws.

Though it was a tight game, Womack was willing to give up the two points. It was more important to help his senior guard and co-captain deal with his grief by playing.

Over on the other bench, though, Rohlman wasn’t so willing to take them. He told the referees to forget the technical and just let Franklin play.

“I could hear them arguing for five to seven minutes, saying, `We’re not taking it, we’re not taking it,” Womack said. “The refs told them, no, that’s the rule. You have to take them.”

That’s when Rohlman asked for volunteers, and McNeal’s hand went up.

He went alone to the free throw line, dribbled the ball a couple of times, and looked at the rim.

His first attempt went about two feet, bouncing a couple of times as it rolled toward the end line. The second barely left his hand.

It didn’t take long for the Milwaukee players to figure out what was going on.

They stood and turned toward the DeKalb bench and started applauding the gesture of sportsmanship. Soon, so did everybody in the stands.

“I did it for the guy who lost his mom,” McNeal told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. “It was the right thing to do.”

They may not remember our record 20 years from now, but they’ll remember what happened in that gym that night – the life lesson Dave Rohlman, head coach of the opposing DeKalb team on what his players will take away from this experience.
Franklin would go on to score 10 points, and Milwaukee Madison broke open the game in the second half to win 62-47. Afterward, the teams went out for pizza, two players from each team sharing each pie.

Franklin stopped by briefly, thankful that his team was there for him.

“I got kind of emotional but it helped a lot just to play,” he said. “I felt like I had a lot of support out there.”

Carlitha Franklin’s funeral was last Friday, and the school turned out for her and her son. Cheerleaders came in uniform, and everyone from the principal and teachers to Johntel’s classmates were there.

“Even the cooks from school showed up,” Womack said. “It lets you know what kind of kid he is.”

“We maybe don’t have the best basketball players in the world but they go to class and take care of business,” Womack said. “We have a losing record but there’s life lessons going on, good ones.”

None so good, though, as the moment a team and a player decided there were more important things than winning and having good stats.

God bless you all.-thanks.

Yes, DeKalb would go home with a loss. But it was a trip they’ll never forget.

“This is something our kids will hold for a lifetime,” Rohlman said. “They may not remember our record 20 years from now, but they’ll remember what happened in that gym that night.”

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of Rivals High from Yahoo Sports.com and AP

Amid the grieving, a rare act of sportsmanship February 18, 2009.

highschool.rivals.com

Image basketball courtesy of Global Photo and i.chow.com

i.ehow.com/images/GlobalPhoto/basketball

Daily stress relief

Take a 10-30 minute walk every 15-ways-to-sneak-in-walking-time-afday.
Smile while you walk. It is the ultimate anti-depressant.
While walking find 3-5 new things about your area you have never seen before .

Give thanks for all the ways God is supporting your peace, health and healing inside and outside your body as you walk.

Breathe in slowly and deeply Then hold your breath for the same count.Then breathe out with that same even slow count. Repeat the same count for each step like 1000, 1001,1002,1003, 1004. 1005. Hold for the same count and exhale for the same count.
If any step is uncomfortable drop the count down a notch.
Caution;
If you have breathing or other medical challenges consult your physician before beginning any new exercises.

Holidays gratitude is the attitude

Gratitude is the attitude -pay it forward

costorepic

Trees for the Troops is a nonprofit that has been giving holiday trees to families of the military since the Iraque war began as a way of saying thanks for your sacrifices and servce to us all. The following are 2007 final statics of who they served. You could help this year by clicking on http;//treesfortroops.org and donating or purchasing a tree for an affiliate across the US.


Number of trees -Delivered 16,846 trees

Number of farms donating trees – More than 750 farmers

Number of states from which the trees came – 29 states

Number of Trees for Troops Weekend (December 1-2) Locations where consumers could purchase trees and donate to Trees for Troops program – 40 retail locations and farms

Number of trees collected during Trees for Troops Weekend – Approximately 4,500

Number of bases to which the trees were delivered – 37 bases plus National Guard families in four states (CA, IL, NY, TN) Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marines, Navy

Number of countries to which trees were shipped – 15

Number of miles the FedEx trailers traveled in delivering the trees – Estimated at 51,000 over the road miles … does not include miles to pickup and delivery points

Christmas Tree farmers and FedEx

donating trees and transportation to say Thank You to our troops and to make their holidays a little brighter.

Others are grateful too

Christie Boyd and Nancy Kemp probably choose to be thankful.
Because times are challenging, Christie and Freddy Boyd will forgo celebrating their anniversary at an expensive Buckhead hotel. That might make some people feel really down, but “Life’s too short to get bent out of shape over petty things,” said Kemp, a 58-year-old schoolteacher from Cairo. “Like my daddy used to say, ‘Sometimes you’ve got to haul off and be happy.”

Boyd and Kemp responded to a Thanksgiving blog posted on ajc.com. Most who responded expressed gratitude for their families and their homes even as they faced difficult personal problems. Boyd and Kemp were among those who responded most positively.

“I wake up in the dark every morning,” said Kemp. “But when I walk out on my porch, I see stars.”

Is happiness all a matter of perspective? Can one consciously choose to be happy?

“Absolutely,” said Paula Bloom, a clinical psychologist and contributor to CNN Espanol. “We all have a hypothesis for how we see the world, and we look for data to support it.

“If you think the world is a crappy place and that people can’t be trusted you will always look for it and find things that strengthens that belief,” Bloom said. But if you think the world is a good place, a safe place and that people are inherently good, you can look for data to support that as well.”

“You must decide daily if the world is good or hostile,” said Bloom, quoting Albert Einstein.

Boyd says she’s managed to maintain a positive attitude despite enduring personal tragedies such as spending 18 months caring for her terminally ill brother and moving into a motor home when her husband lost his job.

The current economic crisis is no different, she said.

In tough times, they choose to be thankful – BEN SMITH Wednesday, November 26, 2008
http://www.ajc.com/holiday/content/atlanta-holiday-guide/stories/2008/11/26/choosing_to_be_thankful.html

I am grateful today for the life and music of Mama Africa Miriam Makeba

Musicians, poets and politicians paid tribute In n Johannesburg for South African singer Miriam Makeba life. The 76-year-old performer stood for freedom of life and expressed it through her music for more than 30 years in exile after lending her support to the campaign against apartheid.miriam-makeba

She lived in harmony with all. At her national memorial service, her music reverberated with consciousness about the real conditions of South Africans. It was a national event with the former South African President Thabo Mbeki and current Deputy President Baleka Mbete present.
President Kgalema Motlanthe, in Washington for a G20 economic summit, paid tribute to Makeba in a video message.
South African trumpet player Hugh Masekela, once married to Makeba, performed a solo version of her song Welele to the accompaniment of soft clapping from the crowd.
Poet Maishe Maponya spoke of how her “lips touched our hearts with hymns of beauty” and how she had inspired her people with hope for the future.

“Let us say it loud and clear. Miriam Makeba was not affectionately called Mama Africa for nothing,” he said. “Her music reverberated with consciousness about the real conditions of South Africans.”
Makeba was the first black singer to win a Grammy award, which she shared with Harry Belafonte in 1965.
She was one of Africa’s best known singers, famed for hits such as Pata Pata and The Click Song.
Former president Nelson Mandela said she was the “mother of our struggle” and “South Africa’s first lady of song”.
Her body was flown home to South Africa on Wednesday; the country began a period of national mourning a day later.

Hundreds bid farewell to Makeba GMT, November 15, 2008

Courtesy of BBC image and excerts: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/7729701.stm

Life your life is priceless. Do not waste a moment! You and what you do counts.
Please share something you are grateful for or how you are helping. It may inspire others.

I am grateful for each of you. Thank you.