“No satisfaction-I want it now!”

Instant gratification (“junkification”) – I want it now!!
We have been programmed or brainwashed  in our society to need to have what we want no matter the price we pay physically or emotionally this instant. Oral gratification is driven by our may unspoken needs for pleasure, love, avoidance and boredom.
As a whole, our capitalist system is designed to get us to take actions and spend money now – and those businesses that are more successful in that do better and prosper (at least in the short term).

Filling those impulses tests our ability to resist temptation and exercise self-control. What’s the benefit of that?
Can the exercise of self control be an important force in our lives?
Several decades ago, Walter Mischel started investigating the determinants of delayed gratification in children. He found that the degree of self-control independently exerted by preschoolers who were tempted with small rewards (but told they could receive larger rewards if they resisted) is predictive of grades and social competence in adolescence.
Delayed gratification is a predictor of success in school and life

Researchers at Duke University have shown that the role of self control creates a better mental and social outcomes in adolescence and into adulthood.
A 1,000 children were followed for 30 years, examining the effect of early self-control on health, wealth and public safety. Controlling for socioeconomic status and IQ, they show that individuals with lower self-control experienced negative outcomes in all three areas, with greater rates of health issues like sexually transmitted infections, substance dependence, financial problems including poor credit and lack of savings, single-parent child-rearing, and even crime. These results show that self-control can have a deep influence on a wide range of activities.  And there is some good news: if we can find a way to improve self-control, maybe we could do better.
Where does the skill of self –control come from?
So when we consider these individual differences in the ability to exert self-control, the real question is where they originate – are they differences in pure, unadulterated ability (i.e., one is simply born with greater self-control) or are these differences a result of sophistication (a greater ability to learn and create strategies that help overcome temptation)?
In other words, are the kids who are better at self control able to control, and actively reduce, how tempted they are by the immediate rewards in their environment, or are they just better at coming up with ways to distract themselves and this way avoid acting on their temptation?
It may very well be the latter.

Ability to resist temptation is environmental, culturally, innately  and cultivated. Some children sat on their hands, physically restraining themselves, while others tried to redirect their attention by singing, talking or looking away.
Mischel found that all children were better at delaying rewards when distracting thoughts were suggested to them.

You can see a modern recreation of the original Mischel experiment by clicking on the video link below.(This experiment should be named Marshmellow Torture-editor’s note)  Who are you most like in the video?
Remember there are many natural medicine strategies to help build self control and overcome addictive compulsive tendencies. Email us if you would like more information.

Editor Mary Wolken, PhD
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“Hope filter radioactive H2O”

As our collective conscious grows and we work together may positive changes are taking place-there is no need to fear.

A natural way to remove radioactive contaminants from water.

The new material is a combination of hemicellulose, a byproduct of forest materials, and chitosan, crushed and powdered crustacean shells that will absorbs water and actually extract contaminates, such as radioactive iodide, from the water itself says researchers from North Carolina State University have found.
“As we’re currently seeing in Japan, one of the major health risks posed by nuclear accidents is radioactive iodide that dissolves into drinking water. Because it is chemically identical to non-radioactive iodide, the human body cannot distinguish it – which is what allows it to accumulate in the thyroid and eventually lead to cancer,” says Dr. Joel Pawlak, associate professor of forest biomaterials.
“The material that we’ve developed binds iodide in water and traps it, which can then be properly disposed of without risk to humans or the environment.”
The new material – a combination of hemicellulose, a byproduct of forest materials, and chitosan, crustacean shells that have been crushed into a powder – not only absorbs water, but can actually extract contaminates, such as radioactive iodide, from the water itself.
This material, which forms a solid foam, has applications beyond radioactive materials. Pawlak and fellow researchers found that it has the ability to remove heavy metals – such as arsenic – from water or salt from sea water to make clean drinking water.
“In disaster situations with limited-to-no power source, desalinating drinking water is difficult, if not impossible. This foam could be brought along in such situations to clean the water without the need for electricity,” Pawlak says.
“This material could completely change the way we safeguard the world’s drinking water supply.”
The foam, which is coated on wood fibers, is used like a sponge that is immersed in water. For smaller-scale applications, the foam could be used in something like a tea bag.

On a larger scale, water could be poured through it like a filter.
Pawlak worked with NC State professor Dr. Richard Venditti on the research, which was funded by the Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, the N.C. Forestry Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy.

Additional research into how the material can be used on a larger scale is currently being conducted.

Excerpts courtesy of http://bit.ly/gw8p59

“Acetaminophen (Tylanol) blood pressure link”

For people with cardiovascular disease who need relief from aches and pains, acetaminophen (Tylenol and its generic cousins) has long been touted as a “safer” alternative to aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen.
Acetaminophen isn’t free from cardiovascular side effects. It is worth a try as a first-line drug for pain relief,
but it can have negative effect on your blood pressure.

A small but important Swiss trial warns that it may not be. This work doesn’t mean you should ditch acetaminophen if it helps you, but does suggest you should give it the caution that it — and every medication — deserves.
A closer look at acetaminophen
The Swiss team set out to fill a surprising gap in medical knowledge: the effect of acetaminophen on blood pressure among people with coronary artery disease. This includes folks with angina (chest pain with exercise or stress) along with anyone who has had bypass surgery or angioplasty or who has been diagnosed with cholesterol-clogged arteries.
The researchers asked 33 men and women with one or more of these problems to take either 1,000 milligrams (mg) of acetaminophen or an identical placebo three times a day for two weeks. Then, after a two-week break, each volunteer took the other treatment. The amount of acetaminophen used in the study is a standard daily dose for pain.
When the participants took acetaminophen, average systolic blood pressure (the top number of a blood pressure reading) increased from 122.4 to 125.3, while the average diastolic pressure (the bottom number) increased from 73.2 to 75.4. Blood pressure stayed steady when participants took the placebo. These increases aren’t large. But they indicate that acetaminophen, like NSAIDs, somehow affects the cardiovascular system.
A larger, longer trial would have given more reliable results. It would also have been unethical, since none of the participants were in pain. That means they couldn’t reap any benefit from acetaminophen, but could only be harmed by it.
Making choices
The sudden removal of the popular painkiller Vioxx from the market in October 2004 over concerns that it caused cardiovascular problems put all pain relievers under the spotlight — except acetaminophen. It avoided the “black box” warning about increased risk of cardiac problems that the FDA now requires on the labels of all NSAIDs. And the American Heart Association later recommended it as a safe alternative to NSAIDs.
Acetaminophen is easier on the stomach than aspirin and other NSAIDs, and is probably a good option for people who take warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven, generic) or clopidogrel (Plavix). But because it is so widely used and perceived as safe, people tend to take it without thinking, one reason acetaminophen is a leading cause of liver failure and transplantation in the United States.
If you have some form of cardiovascular disease, it makes sense to take acetaminophen rather than an NSAID for a fever, headache, pulled muscle, or other occasional problem. But if you need relief every day for pain from osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, acetaminophen may not be a better option than an NSAID — it doesn’t work that well against inflammatory pain and, like an NSAID, may slightly elevate blood pressure.
The key message from this study is that acetaminophen isn’t free from cardiovascular side effects. It is worth a try as a first-line drug for pain relief, but if it doesn’t control your pain, it is reasonable to switch to an NSAID.

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“O2 to the rescue”

Healing should be a simple noninvasive and natural process.

High Dose Of Oxygen Enhances Natural Cancer Treatment


A Petri dish with human cancer cells was placed in this high-pressure oxygen chamber for 48 hours. Source: Reimers Systems

An environment of pure oxygen at three-and-a-half times normal air pressure adds significantly to the effectiveness of a natural compound already shown to kill cancerous cells, researchers at the University of Washington and Washington State University recently reported in the journal Anticancer Research.

The compound artemisinin – isolated from Artemisia annua L, commonly known as wormwood – is a natural remedy widely used to treat malaria. In the mid-1990s UW researchers were the first to explore its ability to treat cancer.

In the new study, using artemisinin or high-pressure oxygen alone on a culture of human leukemia cells reduced the cancer cells’ growth by 15 percent. Using them in combination reduced the cells’ growth by 38 percent, a 50 percent increase in artemisinin’s effectiveness.(“Other natural substances like prickly pear concentrate has upwards of 100% kill in vitro – editor’s note)

“If you combine high-pressure oxygen with artemisinin you can get a much better curing effect,” said author Henry Lai, a UW research professor of bioengineering. “We only measured up to 48 hours. Over longer time periods we expect the synergistic effects to be even more dramatic.”

The history of artemisinin brings to mind an Indiana Jones story. In the early 1970s, Lai says, Chinese leader Mao Zedong issued an order to develop an anti-malarial treatment. At the same time, a farmer in central China discovered a 2,000-year-old tomb that contained three coffins.

One coffin contained a silk scroll describing various prescriptions, including artemisinin to treat malaria. The Chinese followed the directions and thus rediscovered an ancient remedy.

Today, artemisinin is widely used in Asia and Africa for malaria treatment.

In the decades since, scientists have discovered artemisinin reacts with iron within a cell to form a free radical, a highly reactive charged particle that destroys the cell. Because the malaria parasite is high in iron, artemisinin targets malaria-infected cells.

Since rapidly dividing cancer cells also need iron to form new DNA, Lai theorized they would also make targets for artemisinin. Subsequent research showed this to be the case.

Lai and colleagues at the UW developed a variant several thousand times more potent than natural artemisinin, which was licensed in 2004 to a Chinese company.

“Artemisinin is a promising low-cost cancer treatment because it’s specific, it’s cheap and you don’t have to inject it,” Lai said. “It’s 100 times more specific than traditional chemotherapy,” he added. “In breast cancer, it’s even better.”

Lai says he’s long hypothesized that high oxygen levels would enhance artemisinin’s effects, because oxygen promotes the formation of free radicals. In 2010, he put the theory to the test in a hyperbaric chamber that co-author Raymond Quock, WSU professor and chair of pharmaceutical sciences, has been using to study highly pressurized oxygen’s ability to relieve pain.

Hyperbaric chambers, filled with oxygen at high pressure, help scuba divers who surface too quickly gradually readjust to normal oxygen levels. A photo of pop singer Jackson in the mid-80s sleeping in a portable hyperbaric chamber sparked rumors that he was trying to heal scars from plastic surgery, retain his youthful appearance or extend his lifespan.

The photo turned out to be a publicity stunt, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved hyperbaric oxygen therapy for several ailments, including decompression sickness, carbon-monoxide poisoning, severe burns and slow-to-heal wounds.

In clinical practice, the artemisinin-hyperbaric study could lead to people or animals spending time in a hyperbaric chamber to enhance the artemisinin’s effectiveness.

Other co-authors are Yusuke Ohgami, Catherine Elstad and Eunhee Chung of WSU and Donald Shirachi of the Chico Hyperbaric Center. The research was funded by the Washington State University College of Pharmacy and the Chico Hyperbaric Center.

In related artemisinin work, funded through a $1.5 million grant from the state’s Life Sciences Discovery Fund to a team led by UW chemistry professor Tomikazu Sasaki:

UW researchers are developing synthetic artemisinin compounds with enhanced potency and anti-cancer selectivity, and WSU researchers are conducting a clinical trial evaluating these compounds’ ability to treat cancer in dogs. The molecular-engineered artemisinin compounds, which are stronger and more targeted than natural artemisinin but can still be taken by mouth, are licensed to Artemisia Biomedical of Newcastle, Wash.

WSU crop scientists are planting Artemisia annua in eastern Washington to test whether the region could plant artemisinin as a commercial crop.

Researchers are working with Northwest Organic Foods, a Washington chicken-feed company, to try adding artemisinin, instead of small amounts of arsenic, to chicken feed. Artemisinin acts as a natural preventative for avian coccidia infection, one of the poultry industry’s most costly parasitic diseases.

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“Effects of radiation on living tissues”

Radiation may come from either an external source like fallout from bombs, melt down from nuclear power plant melt downs  given off into the environment both air, water and food, x-ray machine, or an internal source, such as an injected radioisotope.

How does radiation effect living tissues?
The impact of radiation on living tissue is complicated by the type of radiation and the variety of tissues.

What effect can ionizing radiation have on the cells’ chemical bonds?
The functions of living tissue are carried out by molecules, that is, combinations of different types of atoms united by chemical bonds. Some of these molecules can be quite large. The proper functioning of these molecules depends upon their composition and also their structure (shape). Altering chemical bonds may change composition or structure.

Ionizing radiation is powerful enough disrupt chemical bonding. For example, a typical ionization releases six to seven times the energy needed to break the chemical bond between two carbon atoms.[91] This ability to disrupt chemical bonds means that ionizing radiation focuses its impact in a very small but crucial area, a bit like a karate master focusing energy to break a brick. The same amount of raw energy, distributed more broadly in nonionizing form, would have much less effect. For example, the amount of energy in a lethal dose of ionizing radiation is roughly equal to the amount of thermal energy in a single sip of hot coffee.[92] The crucial difference is that the coffee’s energy is broadly distributed in the form of nonionizing heat, while the radiation’s energy is concentrated in a form that can ionize.

What is DNA?
Of all the molecules in the body, the most crucial is DNA (deoxyribose nucleic acid), the fundamental blueprint for all of the body’s structures. The DNA blueprint is encoded in each cell as a long sequence of small molecules, linked together into a chain, much like the letters in a telegram. DNA molecules are enormously long chains of atoms wound around proteins and packed into structures called chromosomes within the cell nucleus. Only a small part of this DNA needs to be read at any one time to build a specific molecule. Each cell is continually reading various parts of its own DNA as it constructs fresh molecules to perform a variety of tasks.

What effect can ionizing radiation have on DNA?
Ionizing radiation, by definition, “ionizes,” that is, it pushes an electron out of its orbit around an atomic nucleus, causing the formation of electrical charges on atoms or molecules. If this electron comes from the DNA itself or from a neighboring molecule and directly strikes and disrupts the DNA molecule, the effect is called direct action. This initial ionization takes place very quickly, in about 0.000000000000001 of a second. However, today it is estimated that about two-thirds of the damage caused by x rays is due to indirect action. This occurs when the liberated electron does not directly strike the DNA, but instead strikes an ordinary water molecule. This ionizes the water molecule, eventually producing what is known as a free radical.

A free radical reacts very strongly with other molecules as it seeks to restore a stable configuration of electrons. A free radical may drift about up to 10,000,000,000 times longer than the time needed for the initial ionization (this is still a very short time, about 0.00001 of a second), increasing the chance of it disrupting the crucial DNA molecule. This also increases the possibility that other substances could be introduced that would neutralize free radicals before they do damage.
What immediate effects can ionizing radiation have on living cells?
All of these collisions and ionizations take place very quickly, in less than a second. It takes much longer for the biological effects to become apparent. If the damage is sufficient to kill the cell, the effect may become noticeable in hours or days. Cell “death” can be of two types. First, the cell may no longer perform its function due to internal ionization; or “reproductive death” (mitotic inhibition) may occur when a cell can no longer reproduce, but still performs its other functions.
Death may also result if cell reproduction ceases in parts of the body where cells are continuously being replaced at a high rate (such as the blood cell-forming tissues and the lining of the intestinal tract).

What long-term effects can radiation have?
The effect of the radiation may not be to kill the cell, but to alter its DNA code in a way that leaves the cell alive but with an error in the DNA blueprint. The effect of this mutation will depend on the nature of the error and when it is read. Since this is a random process, such effects are now called stochastic.[100] Two important stochastic effects of radiation are cancer, which results from mutations in nongerm cells (termed somatic cells), and heritable changes, which result from mutations in germ cells (eggs and sperm).

How can ionizing radiation cause cancer?
Cancer is can be produced if radiation does not kill the cell but creates an error in the DNA blueprint. Different cells have different sensitivities to radiation thus some take longer to show its effects like bone marrow is more sensitive than skin cells to radiation-induced cancer.  If the cell’s DNA mutates it can lose control of cell division, and begins dividing uncontrollably which produces the phenomena known as cancer. This effect might not appear for many years.
Cancers induced by radiation do not differ from cancers due to other causes, so there is no simple way to measure the rate of cancer induced by radiation.

Because the cancers can occur anytime in the exposed person’s lifetime,
How can ionizing radiation produce genetic mutations?
The risk of genetic mutation is expressed in terms of the doubling dose: the amount of radiation that would cause additional mutations equal in number to those that already occur naturally from all causes, thereby doubling the naturally occurring rate of mutation.
Well, on the one hand radiation can cause genetic mutation (cell death or cancer)… it can cause illness due to mutated proteins and whatnot that cause cellular function and processes to become messed up (radiation sickness). That is radiation, by itself. Radioactive material gives off radiation. If consumed or ingested, the source of radiation would be inside the body, providing a continuous dose.

Most radioactive materials are poisonous by its very chemical nature… like uranium, cesium, which is a heavy metal… and is poisonous regardless of its isotopic properties.

And chemical isotope that has one chemical property can be consumed and utilized by the body, naturally… like the formation of cell membranes or calcium for bones. If those chemicals themselves were radioactive then when they decay, they will convert to alternative chemicals. The radiation or material itself is irrelevant in this case, but the problem arises in the fact that essential components of the body are no longer built using the proper materials.

Should we be concerned for our health after the Japanese nuclear plant melt downs? See next article

 

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“LOXL2 enzyme spreads cancer”

Did you know?
90 percent of cancer-related deaths occur because a tumor migrates around the patient’s body.
A key to unlock metatasis

The LOXL2 enzyme activity has been linked to the metastasis of a variety of different cancers, including breast, esophageal, colon, and squamous cell cancers.

Researchers analysis of breast cancer patients, found poor survival rates and the spread of some cancers  was linked to high levels of the LOXL2 enzyme. This enzyme  has been linked to the early stages of metastasis of these cancers into the bloodstream.

Around 47,000 new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed in the UK each year and around 12,000 die from the disease.

Recent studies have shown that the lifetime risk of the disease for women is now one in eight.

Experts blamed lifestyle factors, including obesity and drinking alcohol, for fuelling the rise.

Women are also more likely to have children later in life and fewer offspring, which influences the risk.

In the latest study, published in the journal Cancer Research, experts found that LOXL2 promotes the spread of breast cancer through the way it controls two proteins, TIMP1 and MMP9.

In the mice studies, antibodies and chemicals were used to block LOXL2 activity. This prevented breast cancer from metastasizing to other tissues.
These findings are important are an important role in developing a test to try and predict the possible spread of cancer and possible patient outcomes.
Director of Research and Policy at Breast Cancer Campaign, Arlene Wilkie, said, “by using LOXL2 to predict whose cancer will spread and drugs to block the enzyme to stop this from happening, many more lives could be saved.”

This laboratory research shows great promise and we look forward to seeing how it translates into patients.”

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“Lavender oil destroys fungal infections”

Fungi are increasingly resistant to drugs. It is urgent to explore alternatives to combat fungal infections.  Lavender (Lavendula) is an herbal plant whose essential oil have been used for centuries to heal skin tissue from burns, often used as a mild antidepressant and for its anticeptic qualities and as an exotic edible condiment. Finally modern western medical research is being forced to study how it works for its significant clinical benefits.

Lavender oil derived from pressing the leaves and distilling the essence from the volatile oils could be used to combat the increasing incidence of antifungal-resistant infections, according to a study published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology.

The essential oil shows a potent antifungal effect against strains of fungi responsible for common skin and nail infections.

 

Scientists from the University of Coimbra in Portugal distilled lavender oil from the Lavandula viridis L’Her shrub that grows in southern Portugal. The oil was tested against a range of pathogenic fungi and was found to be lethal to a range of skin-pathogenic strains, known as dermatophytes, as well as various species of Candida.
Dermatophytes cause infections of the skin, hair and nails as they use the keratin within these tissues to obtain nutrients. They are responsible for conditions such as Athletes’ foot, ringworm and can also lead to scalp and nail infections.
Candida species coexist with most healthy individuals without causing problems but may cause mucocutaneous candidosis – or thrush – in some people. In immunocompromised patients, Candida species are able to cause serious infection if the fungal cells escape into the blood stream.
Currently, there are relatively few types of antifungal drugs to treat infections and those that are available often have side effects. Professor Ligia Salgueiro and Professor Eugenia Pinto who led this study explained why novel fungicides are urgently needed.
“In the last few years there has been an increase in the incidence of fungal diseases, particularly among immunocompromised patients,” they said.
“Unfortunately there is also increasing resistance to antifungal drugs. Research by our group and others has shown that essential oils may be cheap, efficient alternatives that have minimal side effects.”
Essential oils distilled from the Lavandula genus of lavender plants are already used widely, particularly in the food, perfume and cosmetic industries. Studies of the biological activities of these oils suggest Lavandula oils have sedative and antispasmodic properties as well being potent antimicrobials and antioxidants.

This group has demonstrated that these oils work by destroying fungal cells by damaging the cell membrane. They believe that further research into the mechanisms by which this essential oil works could have significant clinical benefits.

“Lavandula oil shows wide-spectrum antifungal activity and is highly potent. This is a good starting point for developing this oil for clinical use to manage fungal infections. What is now required is clinical trials to evaluate how our in vitro work translates in vivo,” said Professor Salgueiro.

This group has demonstrated that these oils work by destroying fungal cells by damaging the cell membrane. They believe that further research into the mechanisms by

Other uses for lavender include lavender oil used for inhalation therapy to treat headaches, nervous disorders, and exhaustion. Herbalists treat skin ailments, such as fungal infections (like candidiasis), wounds, eczema, and acne, with lavender oil. It is also used in a healing bath for joint and muscle pain. One study evaluating treatments for children with eczema founded it was therapeutic touch from the mother that improved symptoms; in other words, massage with and without essential oils (including lavender) both reduced the dry, scaly skin lesions. Another study found that lavender oil may improve pain control after surgery. Fifty patients undergoing breast biopsy surgery received either oxygen supplemented with lavender oil or oxygen alone. Patients in the lavender group reported better pain control than patients in the control group.

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“Scientists unlock chocolate genes”

Don’t mess with Mother Nature
Researchers have found the genes that code for the production of the cocoa butter in Theobroma cacao, needed to make sweets, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics.
Studying the genes of Mother Nature’s finest crop cacao, researchers are finding ways to make the best chocolate in the world “better”. Better means, increased disease resistance and increased profitability to the grower.

Researchers have found genes that code for the production of cocoa butter, a substance highly prized in chocolate making, confectionery, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Most cocoa beans are already about 50 percent fat, but these 84 genes control not only the amounts fat produced, but quality of the cocoa butter.  Altering these genes might produce chocolate with better flavors, aromas and even “healthier” chocolate by influencing the production of flavonoids, natural antioxidants and terpenoids, hormones and pigments.
The team sequenced the DNA of a variety of Theobroma cacao, considered to produce the world’s finest chocolate. The Maya domesticated this variety of Theobroma cacao, Criollo, about 3,000 years ago in Central America, and it is one of the oldest domesticated tree crops. Today, many growers prefer to grow hybrid cacao trees that produce chocolate of lower quality but are more resistant to disease.
“Fine cocoa production is estimated to be less than 5 percent of the world cocoa production because of low productivity and disease susceptibility,” said Guiltinan, professor of plant molecular biology.
The researchers report in the current issue of Nature Genetics “consumers have shown an increased interest for high-quality chocolate made with cocoa of good quality and for dark chocolate, containing a higher percentage of cocoa, while also taking into account environmental and ethical criteria for cocoa production.”

Author: Mary Wolken, PhD., Ex. Dir CMA

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“Go Mediterranean avoid plus girth”

Adherence to the healthy Mediterranean dietary patterns are key factors for avoiding the natural long-term yearly weight gain occurring during adulthood and with advancing age.
These are the findings of a research study after following 10,000 Spanish university graduates for six years. The average age of the students were 38 years The study found the average participant gained half a pound (0.24 kilograms) per year.
Those that strictly followed the Mediterranean plan were 10 percent less likely to become overweight or obese by the end of the study, and had 24 percent lower odds of packing on more than 11 pounds (5 kilograms) over the study’s first four years.

The Mediterranean dietary pattern focuses on fresh fruit and vegetables, olive oil, non processed grains, lean meat and fish. More weight might have been lost if non-virgin olive oil was used.  This foods combination approach causes less inflammation in the body.

Iris Shai of Ben Gurion University, in Israel, observed that people who follow the Mediterranean diet are likely to be more satiated by the high fiber content of a typical meal and tend to consume fewer “empty calories.”

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“Let’s become buff and serene not beefy”

Looking through the looking glass darkly, some Harvard researchers are predicting that Americans will grow in girth even faster if their have a friend or family member that is beefing it up.

Now, there is a positive statistic.

The total percent of Americans expected to become obese is 42 percent.

Why stop at 42 % or when US citizens get that big will no more fit in this country side by side?

If ever there was a time to become buff not beefy this is it.

Let us go lean and serene.

For tips and simple less expensive changes to create a more lean and serene you click here. Sign up for our newsletter.

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