“Haiti is getting clean H2O”

Clean water in various parts of the world clean water is the gold standard -not the norm.

Even before the earthquake, conditions in Haiti were quite desperate. Just behind our hotel in Port-au-Prince, we visited a creek bed. Just above this area it was clear that this valley was used as the neighborhood trash dump. Pigs and goats fed on the trash.

As terrible as that was, nothing prepared us for this: animals using the same creeks that Haitians drink from everyday. When you live in the city and don’t have access to water in Haiti you either get water from a water truck or scavenge it from open water sources like this one.

Check out how it is coming now to Haiti.

Excerpt courtesy of my.water.org

Many people are helping other people. Share your story with us at compmed.com.

“Protect family -read bar codes”

I am going to watch those bar codes a LOT more now… I am busy reading the ingredients.. Boy.. shopping is a full time job!!!

ALWAYS READ THE LABELS ON THE FOODS YOU BUY–NO MATTER WHAT THE FRONT OF THE BOX OR PACKAGE TURN IT OVER AND READ THE BACK—CAREFULLY!

With all the food and pet products now coming from China , it is best to make sure you read labels at the grocery store and especially Wal-Mart when buying food products. Many products no longer show where they were made, only give where the distributor is located. It is important to read the bar code to track its origin.

How to read Bar Codes … interesting!

This may be useful to know when grocery shopping, if it’s a concern to you.

GREAT WAY TO “BUY USA & CANADA ” AND NOT FROM CHINA!!

The whole world is afraid of China-made “black hearted goods”.
Can you differentiate which one is made in Taiwan or China ?
If the first 3 digits of the barcode are 690, 691 or 692, the product is MADE IN CHINA.
471 is Made in Taiwan .

This is our right to know, but the government and related departments never educate the

public, therefore we have to RESCUE ourselves.

Nowadays, Chinese businessmen know that consumers do not prefer products “MADE IN

CHINA”, so they don’t show from which country it is made.

However, you may now refer to the barcode – remember if the first 3 digits are:

690-692 … then it is MADE IN CHINA
00 – 09 … USA & CANADA
30 – 37 … FRANCE
40 – 44 … GERMANY
471 … Taiwan
49 … JAPAN
50 … UK

BUY USA & CANADIAN MADE by watching for “0” at the beginning of the number.
Support the USA.

Health Tip of the day submitted by JS
Image courtesy of  http://goo.gl/sLbZF

‘Secondhand smoke +early childhood illness”

Homes where children under 12 are exposed to secondhand smoke show an 50% increase in many neurobehavioral and learning and breathing disorders including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, and conduct disorders.
If you must smoke do not do it around your children.

Many childhood diseases are linked to second-hand smoke exposure and smoking in the home, so a smoke-free home has major protective advantages against childhood diseases.

  • Respiratory problems
  • an increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome,
  • acute respiratory infections,
  • more frequent and more severe asthma attacks.

In 2007, about 5.5 million of US children lived in households where someone smoked inside the home.

The National Survey of Children’s Health analyzed 55,358 children younger than 12 years of age. The study was done conducted between April 2007 and July 2008. It found 6% of the children across the US (4.8 million ) younger than 12 years were exposed to secondhand smoke in the home.
Of these children, 8.2% had learning disabilities, 5.9% had attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and 3.6% had behavioral and conduct disorders.
The Risks

Boys had a significantly higher risk, and older children aged 9 to 11 years and those living in households with the highest poverty levels were at greater risk.

Excerpts courtesy of Pediatrics

Excerpts courtesy of Medscape.com

Image courtesy of  http://goo.gl/lM4Cd

“Mushrooms say oil spills be gone!”

Researcher Paul Stamets says mushrooms can eat oil spills and rid the world of toxins.

For more than a decade, mycologist, inventor and researchers Paul Stamets has known

that mushrooms eat oil. Now he has to learn how to do it on a larger scale and get the US government’s blessing.

After the Deep Water Horizon explosions last year, the EPA contacted him several times to request a proposal. They wanted to understand how mycoremediation—the reduction of toxic compounds into harmless ones by fungi—could work as a component of their cleanup strategy for the spill.

Stamets calls fungi the “interface organisms between life and death” because they specialize in breaking indigestible substances down into smaller particles that other living things can use as nutrients.

In fact, polishing the public image of fungus may be more important for Stamets than any decision to bring mushrooms to the Gulf spill. This is because he sees human partnership with fungi as essential to the broader project of creating a sustainable society. Like most other environmentalists, Stamets believes our society is hurting the earth and that the consequences of this damage will be severe. But he differs from the others in his conviction that fungi are the key to repairing that damage, healing the planet and accepting decay as part of nature as well.

Stamets calls fungi the “interface organisms between life and death” because their mic specialize in breaking indigestible substances down into smaller particles that other living things can use as nutrients. It is this ability to digest complex organic compounds that makes fungi so promising for cleaning up oil.

 

Stamets first tested the fungal appetite for oil in 1997, when he teamed up with researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide fungi for several lab-based experiments. The team selected mycelial strains and set them loose on diesel-contaminated soil.

After eight weeks, they found that the fungi had removed 97 percent of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)—heavy chemicals within oil that other forms of remediation had consistently failed to break down.

The next year Washington State Department of Transportation joined with Stamets and the Battelle Marine Science Laboratory to research the most effective bio-safenmethods for cleaning up a maintenance yard contaminated with diesel fuel. Workers scooped piles of the toxic soil onto tarps, and each of several piles were inoculated with, either with a form of oil-eating bacteria or with Stamets’  oyster-mushroom mycelia and wood chips mix.

There were also several control patches of soil.

Results showed that his patches were teeming with huge oyster mushrooms feasting happily on the diesel compounds while destroying more than 95 percent of the PAHs and the mushrooms were also free of any petroleum products. The control and the bacteria patches, were dead, dark, and stinky and the diesel compounds remained.

Because the contamination in the soil patches was very uneven,  it was difficult to measure the precise concentration of contaminants both before and after remediation. However, researchers at the Department of Transportation eventually declared the fungi-cleansed soil pure enough to use for landscaping purposes along the highways of Washington. And in the years since, Stamets’s findings have been replicated by many other researchers, and further study has shown that various types of fungi are able to partially or fully detoxify oil and pesticides.  T^he fungi have also been successful at breaking down depleted uranium from anti-tank shells by allowing it to bond with phosphates to form a more stable mineral.

Since the Deepwater Horizon spill in April 2010, Stamets has been testing his oyster mushrooms for tolerance to salt water and sun in preparation for a gig off the coast of Texas or Louisiana. So far, he’s managed to isolate a strain that can tolerate the salinity of Puget Sound, which is only slightly less than that of the Gulf. And he’s found ways to float the mushrooms cheaply on hemp “mycobooms” filled with straw and mycelia from which the mushrooms can metabolize oil on the surface of the sea.

Stamets has discovered is that the enzymes and acids that mycelium produces to decompose this debris are superb at breaking apart hydrocarbons – the base structure common to many pollutants. So, for instance, when diesel oil-contaminated soil is inoculated with strains of oyster mycelia, the soil loses its toxicity in just eight weeks

Creative solutions under pressure

Stamets says this new research is “very cool and unlikely to have been discovered if it were not for this disaster.” He believes it will be used in the near future and has applied for a provisional patent to prevent oil companies from stealing the research.

(Most likely the oil companies would not want to spend their profits on solutions, but maybe you could try using mushrooms to clean up any small oil soil caused by your car  or truck..- Editor’s note)

Stamets says he would be happy to share it for free

with affected communities in the Gulf of Mexico.

Six ways mushrooms can save the world.

Excerpts courtesy of  http://bit.ly/lLQtR2

Image courtesy of  http://bit.ly/m7U7s3

"Nanoparticles the next major health hazard"

The potential health threats of Nanoparticles :

“When materials are brought down to the nanoscale dimension, their properties for some performance characteristics dramatically change,” said Cagin. ” We have demonstrated that when you go to a particular length scale between 20 and 23 nanometers you actually improve the energy-harvesting capacity by 100 percent.

The gold and silver nanoparticles are beginning to come under close scrutity.

Nanoparticles could threaten human organs such as the liver, heart, kidneys and lungs and brain. Nanoparticles are found in the air, products, soil and through medicine and medical procedures. the problem is that they are so tiny a single particle is one billionth of a meter (3.9 feet) and they accumulate where they lodge. Lodging in the ear after cell phone use; on the body after wearing clothes made withem or wearing them as a medical device or applying them on the skin in the form of retinol A or sunscreen. There have been no long term studies to understand the effects on biological systems including the human body. Now biologicval systems mean no studies on what happen as they enter cells whether it is plant or animal -what does it do to the DNA and other cell organelles and is the effects carried into the chromosomes for the next generation to deal with.

Gold nanoparticles are everywhere. They are used in cancer treatments, automobile sensors, cell phones, blood sugar monitors and hydrogen gas production. However, until recently, scientists couldn’t create the nanoparticles without producing synthetic chemicals that had negative impacts on the environment.gallery-nanoparticle-toxicity-large

“The smaller a particle, the further it can travel through tissue, along airways or in blood vessels,” Dr. Adnan Nasir, a clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, told The New York Times. “Especially if the nanoparticles are indestructible and accumulate and are not metabolized, if you accumulate them in the organs, the organs could fail,” he said.

Minuscule nanoparticles added to consumer products increasingly may be swarming through the body and threatening organs like the liver, U.S. scientists fear. “The smaller a particle, the further it can travel through tissue, along airways or in blood vessels,” Dr. Adnan Nasir, a clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, told The New York Times. “Especially if the nanoparticles are indestructible and accumulate and are not metabolized, if you accumulate them in the organs, the organs could fail,” he said.

Even when made of inert elements, nanomaterials take on unique properties, research suggests. Animal studies indicate nanoparticles can penetrate cells and tissues, move through the body and brain and cause biochemical damage. They have also been linked to testicular cancer and cardiovascular system damage and may pose an environmental hazard, studies suggest. Even a separate study by the U.S. Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology found stoves and toaster ovens emit ultrafine particles of 2 to 30 nanometers.

Their use in lotions and creams particularly in mineral sunscreens has drawn the most critical attention. Consumer products with nanoparticles or based on nanotechnology like clothing, surface treatment, cosmetics and transports. Through these products the most direct contact to consumers occur. The potential health problems related to the use of the products need to be studied immediately and assessed.

The U.S. Environmental Agency is seeking public review and comment on a petition asking the agency to classify nanoscale silver as a pesticide.
The petition, filed by the International Center for Technology Assessment and others, also calls on the EPA to require formal pesticide registration of all products containing nanoscale silver, analyze the potential human health and environmental risks of the tiny germ-killing particles, and take regulatory action against existing products that contain the material.

“Nanosilver is an unknown threat not only to the environment but also to human health,” center staff attorney George Kimbrell said. “The public has no idea that consumer products contain potentially dangerous nanoparticles because no labeling is currently required.”

The petition, filed by the International Center for Technology Assessment and others, also calls on the EPA to require formal pesticide registration of all products containing nanoscale silver, analyze the potential human health and environmental risks of the tiny germ-killing particles, and take regulatory action against existing products that contain the material.

The center said manufacturers are infusing products with nanoscale silver for its enhanced anti-microbial abilities. There are more than 260 nanosilver products currently on the market, including household appliances and cleaners, clothing, cutlery, children’s toys and personal care products.

“Nanosilver is an unknown threat not only to the environment but also to human health,” center staff attorney George Kimbrell said. “The public has no idea that consumer products contain potentially dangerous nanoparticles because no labeling is currently required.”

“Nanosilver is an unknown threat not only to the environment but also to human health,” center staff attorney George Kimbrell said. “The public has no idea that consumer products contain potentially dangerous nanoparticles because no labeling is currently required.”

Environmental danger

Kimbrell said silver is toxic to fish, aquatic organisms and microorganisms. A 2008 study showed that washing nanosilver socks released substantial amounts of the nanosilver into laundry discharge water, which will ultimately reach natural waterways, the center said.
“Nanosilver is an unknown threat not only to the environment but also to human health,” center staff attorney George Kimbrell said. “The public has no idea that consumer products contain potentially dangerous nanoparticles because no labeling is currently required.”

Kimbrell said silver is toxic to fish, aquatic organisms and microorganisms. A 2008 study showed that washing nanosilver socks released substantial amounts of the nanosilver into laundry discharge water, which will ultimately reach natural waterways, the center said.

The U.S. Environmental Agency is seeking public review and comment on a petition asking the agency to classify nanoscale silver as a pesticide.
The petition, filed by the International Center for Technology Assessment and others, also calls on the EPA to require formal pesticide registration of all products containing nanoscale silver, analyze the potential human health and environmental risks of the tiny germ-killing particles, and take regulatory action against existing products that contain the material.

The center said manufacturers are infusing products with nanoscale silver for its enhanced anti-microbial abilities. There are more than 260 nanosilver products currently on the market, including household appliances and cleaners, clothing, cutlery, children’s toys and personal care products.

“Nanosilver is an unknown threat not only to the environment but also to human health,” center staff attorney George Kimbrell said. “The public has no idea that consumer products contain potentially dangerous nanoparticles because no labeling is currently required.” Nanoparticles are used in sun screens to block ultraviolet radiation, in emulsions to contain vitamins in face creams, and in other moisturisers to kill off bacteria. But of 67 firms approached only eight submitted information on the use of nanotechnology in their products. until all the necessary safety tests are carried out, the simple fact is we just don’t know enough.

Individuals must take care of their own health and family safety. The government has not yet required manufacturers of nanomaterials products to have an independent assessment and long term research to determine the safety of all products.

Industry response

In May researchers at the Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh, asked the government to restrict use of carbon nanotubes – in car panels, tennis rackets and bike frames – claiming they posed a cancer risk similar to that of asbestos.

Kimbrell said silver is toxic to fish, aquatic organisms and microorganisms. A 2008 study showed that washing nanosilver socks released substantial amounts of the nanosilver into laundry discharge water, which will ultimately reach natural waterways, the center said.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy  of http://www.safenano.org/NanoecotoxicologyLymnea.aspx

Excerpts courtesy  of http://www.energy-daily.com/reports/Self-powered_devices_may_soon_be_possible_999.html
Excerpts courtesy  ofhttp://www.dhigroup.com/News/NewsArchive/2006/MappingOfNanoproducts.aspx

Excerpts courtesy  of http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/newscience/silver-is-potent-neurotoxicant

Image courtesy of courtesy  http://sci.csc.mrc.ac.uk/images/gallery-nanoparticle-toxicity-large.jpg