“Optimum vitamin D level above 50 ng/ml”

Make it or take it vitamin D level over 50 ng/ml

Professor Hollis is the scientist who provided the best reason to keep your vitamin D level around 50 ng/ml.  Some scientists say 20 ng/ml is good enough because parathyroid hormone (PTH) is pretty much suppressed with levels of 20, other scientists say levels should be 30 because calcium absorption is maximized with that level.  That is, PTH suppression and calcium absorption are biomarkers for adequate vitamin D blood levels.

Professor Hollis provided another biomarker, one every woman – and most men – can immediately accept as the best biomarker yet: how much vitamin D does a woman need to be sure that her breast milk has adequate vitamin D?  When you think about it, that’s about as good as biomarkers get.

Professor Hollis answered that question in his research, finding that when a lactating woman has vitamin D blood levels of 40-50 ng/ml, her breast milk finally has enough vitamin D to support the vitamin D levels of her nursing infant. At levels below 40, the vitamin D content of breast milk becomes unpredictable.  Human breast milk – unlike the breast milk of wild mammals – has little or no vitamin D.  Nature’s most perfect food is too often void of the pre-hormone needed for infant growth and development.

Dr. Bruce found that breast milk is not void of it, it is just that virtually all modern lactating women are void of it.

There is a 25-hydroxyvitamin D test, also called a 25(OH)D. Levels should be above 50 ng/ml (125 nmol/L) year-round, in both children and adults. Thanks to Bruce Hollis, Robert Heaney, Neil Binkley, and others, we now know the minimal acceptable level. It is 50 ng/ml (125 nmol/L). In a recent study, Heaney, et al expanded on Bruce Hollis’s seminal work by analyzing five studies in which both the parent compound (cholecalciferol) and 25(OH)D levels were measured. They found that the body does not reliably begin storing cholecalciferol in fat and muscle tissue until 25(OH)D levels get above 50 ng/ml (125 nmol/L). The average person starts to store cholecalciferol at 40 ng/ml (100 nmol/L), but at 50 ng/ml (125 nmol/L) virtually everyone begins to store it for future use.

At levels below 50 ng/ml (125 nmol/L), the body uses up vitamin D as fast as you can make it, or take it, indicating chronic substrate starvation—not a good thing. 25(OH)D levels should be between 50–80 ng/ml (125–200 nmol/L), year-round.

Two forms of Vitamin D are important in humans: ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3). Vitamin D2 is synthesized by plants. Vitamin D3 is synthesized by humans in the skin when it is exposed to ultraviolet-B (UVB) rays from sunlight. Foods may be fortified with vitamin D2 or D3.Vitamin
Other ways Vitamin D is needed in the body

  • maintains normal blood levels of calcium and phosphorus.
  • aids in the absorption of calcium, helping to form and maintain strong bones.
  • protection from osteoporosis, hypertension (high blood pressure), cancer, and several autoimmune diseases.
  • calcium absorption which your bones need to grow.
  • needed for nerve, muscle, and immune systems function.

Excerpts courtesy of John Cannell, MD/Vitamin D Council  http://bit.ly/kAGVcX

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“Acetaminophen (Tylanol) blood pressure link”

For people with cardiovascular disease who need relief from aches and pains, acetaminophen (Tylenol and its generic cousins) has long been touted as a “safer” alternative to aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen.
Acetaminophen isn’t free from cardiovascular side effects. It is worth a try as a first-line drug for pain relief,
but it can have negative effect on your blood pressure.

A small but important Swiss trial warns that it may not be. This work doesn’t mean you should ditch acetaminophen if it helps you, but does suggest you should give it the caution that it — and every medication — deserves.
A closer look at acetaminophen
The Swiss team set out to fill a surprising gap in medical knowledge: the effect of acetaminophen on blood pressure among people with coronary artery disease. This includes folks with angina (chest pain with exercise or stress) along with anyone who has had bypass surgery or angioplasty or who has been diagnosed with cholesterol-clogged arteries.
The researchers asked 33 men and women with one or more of these problems to take either 1,000 milligrams (mg) of acetaminophen or an identical placebo three times a day for two weeks. Then, after a two-week break, each volunteer took the other treatment. The amount of acetaminophen used in the study is a standard daily dose for pain.
When the participants took acetaminophen, average systolic blood pressure (the top number of a blood pressure reading) increased from 122.4 to 125.3, while the average diastolic pressure (the bottom number) increased from 73.2 to 75.4. Blood pressure stayed steady when participants took the placebo. These increases aren’t large. But they indicate that acetaminophen, like NSAIDs, somehow affects the cardiovascular system.
A larger, longer trial would have given more reliable results. It would also have been unethical, since none of the participants were in pain. That means they couldn’t reap any benefit from acetaminophen, but could only be harmed by it.
Making choices
The sudden removal of the popular painkiller Vioxx from the market in October 2004 over concerns that it caused cardiovascular problems put all pain relievers under the spotlight — except acetaminophen. It avoided the “black box” warning about increased risk of cardiac problems that the FDA now requires on the labels of all NSAIDs. And the American Heart Association later recommended it as a safe alternative to NSAIDs.
Acetaminophen is easier on the stomach than aspirin and other NSAIDs, and is probably a good option for people who take warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven, generic) or clopidogrel (Plavix). But because it is so widely used and perceived as safe, people tend to take it without thinking, one reason acetaminophen is a leading cause of liver failure and transplantation in the United States.
If you have some form of cardiovascular disease, it makes sense to take acetaminophen rather than an NSAID for a fever, headache, pulled muscle, or other occasional problem. But if you need relief every day for pain from osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, acetaminophen may not be a better option than an NSAID — it doesn’t work that well against inflammatory pain and, like an NSAID, may slightly elevate blood pressure.
The key message from this study is that acetaminophen isn’t free from cardiovascular side effects. It is worth a try as a first-line drug for pain relief, but if it doesn’t control your pain, it is reasonable to switch to an NSAID.

Article provided courtesy of  http://hvrd.me/fbVSUy

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“Protect thyroid from radiation”

Women Caution:  Protect your thyroid from radiation                                               

Mammograms and dental X-rays are useful tools for diagnosis, but as Dr. OZ pointed out in a recent show you must speak up to protect your thyroid from excess radiation.

Dr. Oz had a show on the fastest growing cancer in women, thyroid cancer.  He demonstrated that on the apron the dentist puts on you for your dental x-rays there is a little flap that can be lifted up and wrapped around your neck.  Many dentists don’t bother to use it.

There is something called a “thyroid guard” for use specifically during mammograms.   yearly mammogram yesterday. I felt a little silly, but I asked about the guard and sure enough,

Technicians usually have one in a drawer, but do not even ask if you want to use it.You have to take the lead and ask for this added protection.

Approximately 65 percent of the U. S. population is overweight; 30 percent is clinically obese. Research is pointing to the fact that an under active thyroid might be the number one cause of weight problems, especially among women, in the US today.

Protecting and improving thyroid function may be helped by

  1. Eat an extra fruit and an extra vegetable every day.
  2. Drink more nutrient-packed beverages. Many people sip coffee, soda pop or fruit-flavored drinks throughout the day-yet none of these beverages offer much nutritionally. Drink more bioactive water, fresh vegetable and fruit juices,
  3. Eat whole grains Regularly eating whole grains as part of a healthful diet could reduce heart disease risk by as much as 26 percent. Forty studies that looked at 20 different types of cancer deemed whole grains a winner too. Regularly eating whole-grain foods as part of a low-fat diet reduced the risk of many diseases. Experts believe three servings of whole-grain foods a day can make an impact.

 

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“EWG finds chromium 6 in city H20”

Dear Compmed Readers,

Take action today!

In December, Environmental Working Group (EWG) published the first national investigation of the suspected carcinogen chromium-6 — also known as hexavalent chromium — in drinking water in 35 cities around the country. Recently, Senators Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., and Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., introduced Senate Bill 79, the Protecting Pregnant Women and Children from Hexavalent Chromium Act of 2011.

The Boxer/Feinstein bill would require the Environmental Protection Agency to act within a year to set a safe limit for chromium-6 in drinking water. Your senators need to hear from you today that clean, safe drinking water is crucial.

Click here TODAY to tell your senators to co-sponsor the Protecting Pregnant Women and Children from Hexavalent Chromium Act of 2011, introduced by Senators Barbara Boxer and Dianne Feinstein.

EWG supporters like you submitted tap water samples from their communities. This groundbreaking, people-powered report detected chromium-6 in 31 of the 35 city water supplies tested. Even though this report stirred controversy, our findings were confirmed by a number of water utilities’ own testing. Within hours of its release, EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson announced a new plan to help local utilities assess chromium-6 in drinking water nationwide. That’s a good first step. But EPA must go further.

Last week, I testified on our chromium-6 report before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, chaired by Senator Boxer. And I am going to tell you what I told them: we were heartened by and support EPA’s announcement following the release of our report and by its decision to regulate perchlorate, but it is not enough. The Protecting Pregnant Women and Children from Hexavalent Chromium Act of 2011 will make sure there is a safe legal limit on chromium-6 in drinking water.

I have had the opportunity to testify in front of Congress many times, but this was the most gratifying. I was able to stand with the EPA and others concerned with ensuring that all Americans have access to safe, clean drinking water. This hearing — and this bill — are a direct result of EWG’s research. “Keep on doing what you’re doing,” Senator Boxer said to me in her concluding comments at the hearing.

We need to keep the momentum going. I’m counting on you to help us — and everyone else who drinks water.

Click here TODAY to tell your senators to co-sponsor the Protecting Pregnant Women and Children from Hexavalent Chromium Act of 2011.

Safe, clean drinking water is vital to EWG supporters like you. Don’t let this opportunity pass you by. Take action today.

Sincerely,

Ken Cook
President, EWG Action Fund

“Bubbles under breast skin cancer risk”

The old saying “Beauty is only skin deep”, but cancer can go deeper

applies to breast implant cancer risk too.

U.S. government health officials are investigating a possible link between breast implants and a very rare form of cancer known as anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) after reviewing a handful of cases reported over the last 13 years.

ALC attacks the lymph nodes and skin, and has been reported in the scar tissue that grows around implants. So far, the data suggest women with silicone or saline-gel breast implants “may have a very small but significant risk of ALCL in the scar capsule adjacent to the implant,” the agency said.

The body considers the implant as a foreign substance and sends immune boosting cells to the area around the scar tissue to get rid of it. If it cannot the cell mutation occurs and this can lead to cancer.

The cancer, anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, involves the immune system. It is not breast cancer. It is usually a systemic disease, but in the cases linked to implants, the lymphoma grew in the breast, usually in the capsule of scar tissue that formed around the implant. The cases were discovered because women developed symptoms long after they had healed from the implant surgery lumps, pain, asymmetry of the breasts, fluid buildup and swelling.

Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma begins after scar tissue is formed around the implant:
lumps, pain, asymmetry of the breasts, fluid buildup and swelling.

In some cases simply removing the implant and scar tissue gets rid of the disease, but some women might need chemotherapy and radiation, said Dr. William Maisel, the chief scientist and deputy director for science in the drug agency’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. He said there was some evidence, though not conclusive, that the form of this lymphoma found in implant patients was less aggressive than the usual type.

“We need more data and are asking that health-care professionals tell us about any confirmed cases they identify,” said Dr. William Maisel, chief scientist in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s device unit.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is asking doctors to report all cases of the cancer so the agency can better understand the association. The agency is aware of just 60 cases of the disease worldwide among the estimated five million to 10 million women with implants.
This type of lymphoma in the breast is normally found in only 3 in 100 million women who do not have implants.

The devices are marketed in the U.S. by Allergan Inc. and Mentor Corp.
Resources
Excerpts
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