Susan Boyle -Yes we can all make a difference

Never give up dreaming

47 Year old Susan Boyle shocked the judges with her performance in the auditions for Britains Got Talent, singing I dreamed a dream from Les Miserables.

Listen to Susan’s heavenly voice.

Here are the Lyrics (Thanks to NewHotdox)

I dreamed a dream in time gone by
When hope was high,
And life worth living
I dreamed that love would never die
I dreamed that God would be forgiving.

Then I was young and unafraid
When dreams were made and used,
And wasted
There was no ransom to be paid
No song unsung,
No wine untasted.

But the tigers come at night
With their voices soft as thunder
As they tear your hopes apart
As they turn your dreams to shame.

And still I dream he’ll come to me
And we will live our lives together
But there are dreams that cannot be
And there are storms
We cannot weather…

I had a dream my life would be
So different from this hell I’m living
So different now from what it seems
Now life has killed
The dream I dreamed.

Thanks you Susan for showing us that wonderful talents no no age or image and the joy of sharing your gift can be appreciated by all.

Resources

Listen to her heavenly voice: courtesy of Youtube.com

Country doctoring- Virginia there still is a Santa Claus

Long thought extinct from the American health care frontier one has been found alive and serving his rural patients -a dedicated doctor that make house calls. One has been loving his work for 50 years!

In Yoakum, Texas a sleepy country town, that sprang up around a railroad junction  folks knows Doc Watson.

Over the last 50 years, this tall and lanky family general practitioner welcomed many of the town’s citizens and doctored most of the others.

“I never wanted to be anything other than a family doctor,” Watson said as he sat in the hospital cafeteria on a recent December day. Pork chops and chicken fried steak (“good home cooking,” noted Watson) were on the menu, a reminder of the small-town atmosphere that drew the Baylor College of Medicine graduate to Yoakum in 1958.

The frayed and stained  doctor’s bag he brought with him is marked by the scars of countless moments of birth, death and recovery. Over the years he has served several generations of patients in this town of 6,000 about 100 miles east of San Antonio.

He began his practice charging $3 for office visits and $5 for house calls, but he often accepted other kinds of payment including homemade pies, fresh vegetables, deer meat and sausages. One grateful patient gave Watson, a hardcore golfer, one of her husband’s old 2-irons. It still sits in a corner of his office.

“He’s always right there when you need him,” said Karen Barber, CEO of the Yoakum Community Hospital, where a wing is named after Watson. “There’s never a second thought for him. He just does what needs to be done.”
The night Janet Jaco’s little girl had to be rushed to the hospital with a sudden hemorrhage, David Watson walked the four blocks from his house to the Yoakum Community Hospital every hour on the hour to check on his patient and offer a comforting shoulder to her worried mother.

The night the hospital urgently needed blood for an obstetrics patient, Watson rushed down from his office to donate some of his O-negative, then stayed to call in other townspeople with the right blood type. (He knew who they were.)

Flooded roads  did not stop him on night  from getting to an ailing neighbor; he simply jumped on the tractor, put one arm around the driver and  the other held his worn leather doctor’s bag as they went to the hospital.

Dr. Watson received the Country Doctor of the Year award this month. The honors is awarded annual to a primary care physician who best exemplifies the spirit of rural practitioners.

At 78, he still sees up to 30 patients a day at the Yoakum Medical Clinic, the office where he has worked for half a century. He visits another 30 patients during daily rounds at the hospital and a local nursing home, treats children at the Bluebonnet Youth Ranch and continues to make house calls.

Love what you do -do it to the best of your abilities and the world will be a better place for you having walked and served here.

Thanks Dr. Watson for your dedicated loving service.

Yes Virginia the spirit of Christmas lives on every day through loving dedicated people.

Resources

Country Doctor of Year: 50 years of house calls

–  MONICA RHOR, AP Dec 29, 2008. as reported in YahooNews http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081229/ap_on_re_us/country_doc;_ylt=Assc

Video http://www.breitbart.com/image.php?id=app-0a97c0ec-962d-440d-b410-864d8e3852cd&show_article=1&catnum=0&ch=BNImagesAll:

Holidays gratitude is the attitude

Gratitude is the attitude -pay it forward

costorepic

Trees for the Troops is a nonprofit that has been giving holiday trees to families of the military since the Iraque war began as a way of saying thanks for your sacrifices and servce to us all. The following are 2007 final statics of who they served. You could help this year by clicking on http;//treesfortroops.org and donating or purchasing a tree for an affiliate across the US.


Number of trees -Delivered 16,846 trees

Number of farms donating trees – More than 750 farmers

Number of states from which the trees came – 29 states

Number of Trees for Troops Weekend (December 1-2) Locations where consumers could purchase trees and donate to Trees for Troops program – 40 retail locations and farms

Number of trees collected during Trees for Troops Weekend – Approximately 4,500

Number of bases to which the trees were delivered – 37 bases plus National Guard families in four states (CA, IL, NY, TN) Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marines, Navy

Number of countries to which trees were shipped – 15

Number of miles the FedEx trailers traveled in delivering the trees – Estimated at 51,000 over the road miles … does not include miles to pickup and delivery points

Christmas Tree farmers and FedEx

donating trees and transportation to say Thank You to our troops and to make their holidays a little brighter.

Others are grateful too

Christie Boyd and Nancy Kemp probably choose to be thankful.
Because times are challenging, Christie and Freddy Boyd will forgo celebrating their anniversary at an expensive Buckhead hotel. That might make some people feel really down, but “Life’s too short to get bent out of shape over petty things,” said Kemp, a 58-year-old schoolteacher from Cairo. “Like my daddy used to say, ‘Sometimes you’ve got to haul off and be happy.”

Boyd and Kemp responded to a Thanksgiving blog posted on ajc.com. Most who responded expressed gratitude for their families and their homes even as they faced difficult personal problems. Boyd and Kemp were among those who responded most positively.

“I wake up in the dark every morning,” said Kemp. “But when I walk out on my porch, I see stars.”

Is happiness all a matter of perspective? Can one consciously choose to be happy?

“Absolutely,” said Paula Bloom, a clinical psychologist and contributor to CNN Espanol. “We all have a hypothesis for how we see the world, and we look for data to support it.

“If you think the world is a crappy place and that people can’t be trusted you will always look for it and find things that strengthens that belief,” Bloom said. But if you think the world is a good place, a safe place and that people are inherently good, you can look for data to support that as well.”

“You must decide daily if the world is good or hostile,” said Bloom, quoting Albert Einstein.

Boyd says she’s managed to maintain a positive attitude despite enduring personal tragedies such as spending 18 months caring for her terminally ill brother and moving into a motor home when her husband lost his job.

The current economic crisis is no different, she said.

In tough times, they choose to be thankful – BEN SMITH Wednesday, November 26, 2008
http://www.ajc.com/holiday/content/atlanta-holiday-guide/stories/2008/11/26/choosing_to_be_thankful.html

I am grateful today for the life and music of Mama Africa Miriam Makeba

Musicians, poets and politicians paid tribute In n Johannesburg for South African singer Miriam Makeba life. The 76-year-old performer stood for freedom of life and expressed it through her music for more than 30 years in exile after lending her support to the campaign against apartheid.miriam-makeba

She lived in harmony with all. At her national memorial service, her music reverberated with consciousness about the real conditions of South Africans. It was a national event with the former South African President Thabo Mbeki and current Deputy President Baleka Mbete present.
President Kgalema Motlanthe, in Washington for a G20 economic summit, paid tribute to Makeba in a video message.
South African trumpet player Hugh Masekela, once married to Makeba, performed a solo version of her song Welele to the accompaniment of soft clapping from the crowd.
Poet Maishe Maponya spoke of how her “lips touched our hearts with hymns of beauty” and how she had inspired her people with hope for the future.

“Let us say it loud and clear. Miriam Makeba was not affectionately called Mama Africa for nothing,” he said. “Her music reverberated with consciousness about the real conditions of South Africans.”
Makeba was the first black singer to win a Grammy award, which she shared with Harry Belafonte in 1965.
She was one of Africa’s best known singers, famed for hits such as Pata Pata and The Click Song.
Former president Nelson Mandela said she was the “mother of our struggle” and “South Africa’s first lady of song”.
Her body was flown home to South Africa on Wednesday; the country began a period of national mourning a day later.

Hundreds bid farewell to Makeba GMT, November 15, 2008

Courtesy of BBC image and excerts: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/7729701.stm

Life your life is priceless. Do not waste a moment! You and what you do counts.
Please share something you are grateful for or how you are helping. It may inspire others.

I am grateful for each of you. Thank you.