"TM -one way to concentrate and sleep better"

Josh Goulding was diagnosed with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in second grade, after his impulsive and disruptive behavior frequently landed him in the school principal’s office. “Over several years, I was put on a whole gamut of drugs, and nothing worked well,” says Goulding, now 24. By his second year at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, Goulding was still struggling to concentrate in classes and complete his work, and his medications were causing mood swings and irritability.

The Conventional Rx: Stimulant drugs, such as Ritalin and Adderall. Almost 4.5 million children between ages 4 and 17 are diagnosed with ADHD, and nearly half of them take prescription medications, often for years. Long term, these drugs may be physically and psychologically harmful, and side effects such as sleep disturbances, poor appetite, weight loss, and mood disorders can require further medication.

The Alternative Rx: Transcendental Meditation (TM). In the first study on ADHD and TM, middle-school-age children who did twice daily nonreligious meditations for 10 minutes reduced their stress levels by over 50 percent–resulting in fewer ADHD symptoms. “TM helps children focus on a special mantra or sound, which helps the child transcend mental busyness and stress,” says Sarina Grosswald, EdD, coauthor of the study. “This allows the child’s body to completely relax and his mind to stay fully awake without effort. The results are improved behavior, grades, creativity, and inner stability.”

Success As a result of Goulding learned TM techniques of relaxing and concentration:

his sleep improved

better ability to focus his attention

ability to communicate with others more effectively inproved

GPA (grades) improved.

blood pressure was lower

no longer needed ADHD medications

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"Communication without words after trauma or disease"

There is a new machine that can help individuals that have lost the ability to speak talk again.

Cathy Wolf  lost her ability to speak, but through a new speech assist machine called the Brain-Computer Interface system, she can communicate again.

Cathy Wolf of Katonah, N.Y., is able to manage only a small amount of muscle movement in her face and neck. Still, she’s helping test an alternative communication system that, it’s hoped, will help her and others with ALS compensate for this loss of voluntary muscle control.

Wolf currently uses the WiViK onscreen keyboard, E-triloquist speech program software and a switch she can operate with her eyebrow. When the time comes, she says, she will use BCI full time.

The Brain-Computer Interface system reads electric currents created by nerve cells talking to each other in the brain. It allows users to control a computer and communicate through e-mail, other computer-based communication systems, or synthetic speech.

Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is under development by researchers at the Wadsworth Center, an arm of the New York State Department of Health, in Albany, N.Y. The BCI system — comprising a small laptop computer, an amplifier, a 20-inch monitor and a cap fitted with electrodes — “reads” the electric currents created by cellular activity in the brain, allowing the user to control a computer and communicate through e-mail, other computer-based communication systems or synthetic speech.

Brain signals instead of muscles It’s hoped that BCI will be made widely available for in-home use by people unable to communicate by other means as a result of disease or injury. Although it has potential for use by people affected by spinal cord injuries, stroke or other diseases, Wolf and the four other people currently testing the system all have ALS.

The BCI system is calibrated to the individual, and its use in anyone with advanced ALS requires a caregiver or someone else who can first put the cap containing the electrodes on the user’s head, and then start the system. From there, the user can control everything using brain signals instead of muscles, up to and including shutting down the computer.

In fall 1997, Wolf learned she has ALS. Since then, management of the disease has included a tracheostomy and ventilator, and a feeding tube. Unable to speak, Wolf communicates with her husband Joel and the rest of the world using a WiViK onscreen keyboard; E-triloquist speech program software; and a SCATIR switch that works through detection of a reflected beam of light and which she operates with her eyebrows.

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Resources

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"Hope for traumatic brain injury"

“Brain injuries differ dramatically from patient to patient depending on the location, type, intensity, and duration of the injury. An injury can immediately cause rips in the white matter, brain hemorrhage, swelling, and, most commonly, bruising. One insult (i.e. hitting head, swelling, bleeding or residual trauma from an old injury to the brain)) is superimposed on another as, following the injury, the brain begins to experience reduced blood flow and oxygen deficiency…

Within minutes or hours after an injury, tiny holes rip through neuronal membranes and ion channels get stuck open, leaking proteins and neurotransmitters. Free radicals and calcium spread, causing cell death and tissue damage. Early gene activation of apoptotic enzymes sends more cells into a death spiral. Mitochondria sputter, then fall silent. Astrocytes swell. The damage can be isolated or extensive.

Researchers and doctors to date have had a very antiquated system of classification for TBIs. A new, validated system has now been devised which divides TBI patients into subgroups based on the type and location of injuries, not based on their consciousness. Then, therapies that benefit specific injury types can be targeted to those subgroups. It is the initial step toward a positive clinical trial for TBI.
Another ray of hope for the treatment of TBIs is the use of progesterone. It seems to pose the possibility of becoming the magic bullet for the treatment.
Through  Don Stein’s 27 years of research on progesterone is has been shown that progesterone  produced in the brain as well as the ovaries and can easily cross the blood brain barrier. Both men and women have progesterone receptors in their brains and it  prevents the expression of inflammatory cytokines in the brain, block apoptosis, stimulate growth-promoting factors, and even have a role in remyelination of neurons.

Thus progesterone decreases the accumulation of fluids in the brain after injury, reduces secondary neuronal loss, and improves outcomes in rats. “It’s the Swiss army knife of therapies,” laughs Douglas Smith, director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Brain Injury and Repair. “It can take care of everything.”

Human trials are soon to get under way.

Natural integrated care and medicine like homeopathic remedies and acupuncture and neuro- kinesiology can be used to augment traditional care. These energetic forms of care can monitor the trauma, by the changing pulses and the meridian flows to determine how the body’s energetic systems are dealing with the trauma and then homeopathy can neural-kinesiology can de-stress the neuronal circuitry to enhance the healing and recovery process.
For more information on integrated medicine’s care of brain trauma contact.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of       http://www.the-scientist.com
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