“Link trans fats and inflammatory diseases”

The escalation of chronic inflammatory diseases like heart, diabetes, weight gain, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel, many digestive and countless immune conditions like allergy, colds and flu is parallel to the growth in popularity of trans fats in the modern American diet.

Prior to 1910, dietary fats consisted primarily of butterfat, beef tallow, and lard.  In the early 1900s,  soybean oil came into use as a by product of the soybean industry. At the same time, there was not enough butterfat available for consumers. The method of hydrogenating fat and turning a liquid fat into a solid one had been discovered, and now the ingredients (soybeans) and the “need” (shortage of butter) were there. The fat industry found that hydrogenated fats was born.
Hydrogenated fat such as Crisco and Spry, sold in England, began to replace lard in the baking of bread, pies, cookies, and cakes in 1920. Production of hydrogenated fats (trans fats or saturated fats)  increased steadily until the 1960s, as processed vegetable fats replaced animal fats in the US and other western countries.

In 1988s research began to sound the alarm that trans fats could be a cause of the large increase in coronary artery disease and other inflammatory diseases. In 1994, it was estimated that trans fats caused 20,000 deaths annually in the US from heart disease. Women are more effected by saturated fats than men, but no one is immune. Leading a life sitting 6 hours plus a day will dramatically raise your chances of thickening  your belly and your arteries.

By January 2007, consumer and medical pressure and the USFDA forced Crisco to reformulate their product. of an outright ban on the sale of their product, Crisco was reformulated to meet the United States Food and Drug Administration definition of “zero grams trans fats per
Today chronic, low-grade inflammation almost always lurks beneath the surface of chronic diseases like diabetes, heart inflammation, excess weight, and many immune disorders. Low-grade inflammation has also been linked to an increased risk of cancer and Alzheimer?s disease. If you have any of the above conditions or unexplained weight gain or big emotional swings, your doctor/health practitioner can measure it with the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein or CRP test to find out if this inflammatory factor is very high. Changing what you eat and increase your exercise level can help.

Next article: Eating to decrease inflammation -good fats. -M.Wolken, PhD. Exec. Dir. CMA

Sign up today for our news letter so you won’t miss an article.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trans_fat#cite_note-Harvard-12

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *