“What’s swinging in your family tree?”

– M.Wolken editor of CMANews
When I went in the early 90s to a family reunion for my mother family I took time to observe what was swinging from my family’s health tree and the decade of life these  various health imbalances began to show. It was fasinating glimpse into the my possible health future.
My training in natural medicines especially Homeopathy has taught me to look at each of life’s challenges from a different perspective. Our response to each health and or emotional crisis has come to be from our cumulative training from those people and the environment both inside our body as well as those stresses of living our life has brought us.

To assist a person  find peace and wellness a practitioner must learn as much about the entire personal and familial history  as possible. Nothing in health or dis-ease happens in isolation.

Family health history a powerful, underused tool in modern medicine today.
In integrated medical practice like homeopathy, ayurvedic, oriental, and naturopathic medicines, the family history has always been seen as needed. We were taught the better the initial history the better the evaluation, the better insight, the better individualized care and the more positive the healing.

In Homeopathy and Oriental medicine add another aspect to the history and patient profile, learning how to observe how a person, how they move, presents themselves, shake hands, the health and coloring of their tongue and their emotional history are the vital components of the patient history.

These wholistic aspects to patient care are so often ignored or missed in the current “managed care system of seeing a person every 3 to 5 minutes, reminding them to focus only on what is bothering them the most and running on to the next person before the patient has gotten acquainted with the professional.
A recent  Cleveland Clinic study compared using a good oral family history to using simply the lab results from an online genomic testing services that analyze DNA glitches and predict people’s predisposition to various diseases to uncovered who might be at an increased risk of cancer.  Not surprisingly , a good family history taken by an office assistant from relatives accompanying the patient was found to be a better predictor.
All it costs is a little time questioning your relatives, yet good family health trees are rare. A government survey estimated less than a third of families have one – and time-crunched doctors seldom push their patients to remedy that.

*Encourage each family to write down as much as they can remember about the conditions their parents and elderly had, how they died and from what. Knowing both sides of your family tree are vital. A study of 2,500 women found that women not only know less about the health of their paternal relatives, they tend to dismiss the threat of breast cancer if it’s on Dad’s side.
“It’s a risk no matter what,” says Dr. Wendy Rubinstein of Chicago’s North Shore University Health System.

Dr. Charis Eng, a cancer geneticist at the Cleveland Clinic’s Genomic Medicine Institute believes that  “It’s the best-kept secret in health care.”

How to start your family health history.

The U.S. Surgeon General operates a free website – https://familyhistory.hhs.gov – that helps people create a family health history and share it electronically with relatives and their doctor.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of   http://yhoo.it/bHQ9DS

Image courtesy of   http://bit.ly/dkVaZZ

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