“Pesticides and Parkinson’s disease”

Researchers at UCLA announced they had discovered a linked Parkinson’s disease to two chemicals commonly sprayed on crops to fight pests.
For farmers who constantly work with pesticides and for people living near where farm fields the risk for Parkinson’s disease increased by 75 percent. The three culprits are fungicide maneb, the herbicide paraquat and pesticide, ziram.

Further study indicated that individuals working in building near the fields like in school teachers, fire fighters, office workers or clerks risk from secondary (ambient) exposure is 80 per cent.
There is strong evidence in humans that the combination of the three chemicals confers a greater risk of Parkinson’s than exposure to the individual chemicals alone. Because these pesticides affect different mechanisms leading to cell death, they may act together to increase the risk of developing the disorder: Those exposed to all three experienced the greatest increase in risk.

Scientists knew that in animal models and cell cultures, such pesticides trigger a neurodegenerative process that leads to Parkinson’s, a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that often impairs motor skills, speech and other functions and for which there is no cure.
The disease has been reported to occur at high rates among farmers and in rural populations, contributing to the hypothesis that agricultural pesticides may be partially responsible.

Exposure to these toxic chemicals may have occurred years before the onset of motor symptoms, when a diagnosis of Parkinson’s is made.

Avoid pesticide use.

Ziram synuclein accumulated in dopamine neurons, selectively killing them. When it was given systemically to rodents, it reproduced many of the features of Parkinson’s disease.
Excerpts courtesy of  http://bit.ly/jdN63I

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