“15 most contaminated fruits and veggies”

If you make a copy of Environmental Working Group (EWG’S) 2011 Shopper’s Guide. It will helps cut consumer pesticide exposure and consumption.

EWG just released their seventh edition of its Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce with updated information on 53 fruits and vegetables and their total pesticide loads.
Analysts at EWG synthesized data collected from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration from 2000 to 2009. Produce is ranked based on a composite score, equally weighing six factors that reflect how many pesticides was found in testing of on each type of the produce and at what levels. Most samples are washed and peeled prior to being tested, so the rankings reflect the amounts of the chemicals likely present on the food when is it eaten.
Apples now the number one most pesticide laden fruit or vegetable when tested by USDA, showed up on 98 percent of the more than 700 apple samples tested.
Buy fruits and vegetables carefully if you are not able to buy clean pesticide freee local produce/organic.
The high toxicity of pesticides both to  human health and the environment should make more families and individuals wary of eating or using them. Pesticides poisoning has been linked to nervous system disorders, cancer, hormone system disruption learning challenges in children.
Even small amounts of these chemicals add up and can impair a child’s health when they’re exposed during the early, critical stages of their development. When pesticide sprayers have to bundle up in astronaut-like suits for protection, it’s clear parents want to feed their families food containing as little of these toxic chemicals as possible.”
Avoid exposure to pesticides, including pesticide residues on food.”
EWG’s Shoppers Guide is available for fee as a PDF download at http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/. An iPhone app will be available in the near future. For a small donation, consumers can also have a version of the guide sent to them as a bag tag that can be attached to reusable shopping bags.

1. apples  2  celery   3  Strawberries

4  Peaches  5  Spinach  6  Nectarines – imported

7  Grapes – imported  8  Sweet bell peppers  9  Potatoes

10  Blueberries ( domestic )  11  Lettuce  12  Kale/collard greens
13  Cilantro   14  Cucumbers   15  Grapes – domestic

EWG is a nonprofit research organization based in Washington, DC that uses the power of information to protect human health and the environment.

Excerpts courtesy of  EWG

Image courtesy of  http://bit.ly/kXfnYA

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