The rosary – yoga what’s the link?

Rhythmic prayer, such as saying the rosary, seems to affect the heart rate
in the same way as doing yoga.
Research on the health benefits of prayer has shown decidedly mixed
results. When individuals pray in a ritualistic or rhythmic way, such as
saying the rosary or repeating a mantra, they can lower their heart rate.
In fact, one study showed that the cardiovascular effects of rhythmic
prayer are similar to that of doing yoga. Studies on the effects of
intercessory prayer — that is, prayer for other people — show less
optimistic results. One study even showed that people who received
intercessory prayer from other people were more likely to suffer
post-surgery complications.

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-the-health-benefits-of-prayer.htm?m

"TM -one way to concentrate and sleep better"

Josh Goulding was diagnosed with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in second grade, after his impulsive and disruptive behavior frequently landed him in the school principal’s office. “Over several years, I was put on a whole gamut of drugs, and nothing worked well,” says Goulding, now 24. By his second year at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, Goulding was still struggling to concentrate in classes and complete his work, and his medications were causing mood swings and irritability.

The Conventional Rx: Stimulant drugs, such as Ritalin and Adderall. Almost 4.5 million children between ages 4 and 17 are diagnosed with ADHD, and nearly half of them take prescription medications, often for years. Long term, these drugs may be physically and psychologically harmful, and side effects such as sleep disturbances, poor appetite, weight loss, and mood disorders can require further medication.

The Alternative Rx: Transcendental Meditation (TM). In the first study on ADHD and TM, middle-school-age children who did twice daily nonreligious meditations for 10 minutes reduced their stress levels by over 50 percent–resulting in fewer ADHD symptoms. “TM helps children focus on a special mantra or sound, which helps the child transcend mental busyness and stress,” says Sarina Grosswald, EdD, coauthor of the study. “This allows the child’s body to completely relax and his mind to stay fully awake without effort. The results are improved behavior, grades, creativity, and inner stability.”

Success As a result of Goulding learned TM techniques of relaxing and concentration:

his sleep improved

better ability to focus his attention

ability to communicate with others more effectively inproved

GPA (grades) improved.

blood pressure was lower

no longer needed ADHD medications

Shared courtesy of    http://bit.ly/fU19R

ID sleep disorders through facial analysis 76% accurate

A team of researchers from the University of Sydney has developed an innovative method to analyse digital photographs of faces in order to determine an individual’s risk of developing Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA). In conjunction with the Royal North Shore Hospital and the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, Professor Peter Cistulli and Dr Richard Lee have found that analysis of detailed measurements of the face from digital photographs can help doctors identify those most in danger of developing OSA.ucsi018651mansleep

The potential clinical application to improved recognition and diagnosis of OSA in the community in a user friendly real time manner is great.

Four per cent of Australian middle-aged men and two per cent of middle-aged women suffer from OSA syndrome, while almost 50 per cent of middle-aged men snore during sleep: a symptom of OSA. The disease is characterised by the repetitive closure of the upper airway during periods of interrupted sleep and is associated with high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes and strokes. Previous methods of diagnosis have involved expensive specialist assessment and overnight monitoring in a sleep laboratory, meaning the majority of OSA sufferers are as yet undiagnosed.

“This new approach is really a response to the critical clinical need to develop more readily accessible, non-invasive methods that can enable doctors to more efficiently diagnose larger numbers of patients,” Professor Cistulli.

“The new test accurately diagnosed 76 per cent of OSA cases, yielding a higher success rate than the traditional clinical methods of questionnaires, medical histories and examinations.”

Resources

Researchers give a face to sleep disorders Science Alert Australia & New Zealand University of Sydney January 13, 2009.

http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20091301-18671-2.html

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA): a cephalometric analysis of severe and non-severe OSA patients. Part 1: Multiple comparison of cephalometric variables. – V. Tangugsorn et al,  International Journal of Adult Orthodontics and Orthognathic Surgery 2000:15(2):139-52.

http://www.usyd.edu.au/news/84.html?newsstoryid=2962

Contact: Jacob O’Shaughnessy Phone: 02 9351 4312

How do ipRGCs effect our sleep and health?

siod_eye_cells_04The 24  hour biological clock that creates a balance for  health and harmony in the body runs on light. Changes in levels of in light effect the photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs).  located behind the rods and cones of the retina in the eye. When darkness falls and we go to bed. As the eyes close, the change in light intensity (or lack of light) is registered on these ipRGC cells and a message is sent to the hypothalamicCircadian rhythm Suprachiasmatic Nucleus (SCN) and the olivarypretectal nucleus (OPN) located in the frontal part of the brain (behind the area between your eyebrows)” it is time to sleep”. Then the SCN and OPN begin the night time hormone production. This cascade of hormones is part of the   body’s  circadian rhythms.

There is only 1,000 to 2,000cells gauge the overall light intensity branch-like  ipRGCs eye cells in mammals are responsible for telling the body clock whether it was day or night and when to turn melatonin on for a restful sleep.

Next Importance of melatonin to our health and wellness.

Image courtesy of www.livescience.com

Memory loss linked to sleep apnea

“The findings, from brain scan studies conducted by researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, show for the first time that sleep apnea is associated with tissue loss in brain regions that store memory…
“Our findings demonstrate that impaired breathing during sleep can lead to a serious brain injury that disrupts memory and thinking,” said principal investigator Ronald Harper, professor of neurobiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at U.C.L.A.

-Excerpted from By Tara Parker Common Sleep Problem Linked With Memory Loss June 22, 2008

http://www.bri.ucla.edu/bri_weekly/news_080622.asp