"Creating peace inside and in business dealings"

Don Miguel Ruiz
Don Miguel Ruiz

The Four Agreements

Don Miguel Ruiz’s Code for Life


1. Be impeccable with your word

Speak with integrity. Say only what you mean. Avoid using the word to speak against yourself or to gossip about others. Use the power of your word in the direction of truth and love. agreement

2. Don’t take anything personally

Nothing others do is because of you. What others say and do is a projection of their own reality, their own dream. When you are immune to the opinions and actions of others, you won’t be the victim of needless suffering. agreement

3 . Don’t make assumptions

Find the courage to ask questions and to express what you really want. Communicate with others as clearly as you can to avoid misunderstandings, sadness and drama. With just this one agreement, you can completely transform your life. agreement

4. Always do your best

Your best is going to change from moment to moment; it will be different when you are healthy as opposed to sick. Under any circumstance, simply do your best, and you will avoid self-judgment, self-abuse and regret.

Yes ,we can change the world -one dedicated person at a time.

Don Miguel Ruiz’s philosophy come from the ancient Toltec wisdom of the native people of Southern Mexico. The Toltec were ‘people of knowledge’ – scientists and artists who created a society to explore and conserve the traditional spiritual knowledge and practices of their ancestors. The Toltec viewed science and spirit as part of the same entity, believing that all energy – material or ethereal – is derived from and governed by the universe.

Don Miguel Ruiz was a medical doctor and surgeon in Mexico After an automobile accident, he returned to his roots as Toltec and began healing, teaching, lecturing and writing during the 1980’s and 90’s.

Thank you for your inspired guidance, wisdom and peace you share.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of businessballs.com/thefouragreementsdonmiguelruiz

Excerpts courtesy of rethinkingeducation.net/adults.html#immersions

Image courtesy of specialneedsfamilyfun.com/donmiguelruiz

"Relax-where you want to go."

Another way people are helping people.

Take a break and relax.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0W0jTzDn-sw&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0&color1=0x006699&color2=0x54abd6&border=1]



Thanks Christian Tatonetti for your beautiful music!

Resources


Video courtesy of


Rarified sportmanship -people helping people

There were no other options for this coach. It didn’t matter that his DeKalb, Ill., High School basketball team had ridden a bus two and a half hours to get to Milwaukee, then waited another hour past game time to play. Didn’t matter that the game was close, or that this was a chance to beat a big city team.

Johntel Franklin scored 10 points in the game following the loss of his mother.
Something else was on Dave Rohlman’s mind when he asked for a volunteer to shoot two free throws awarded his team on a technical foul in the second quarter. His senior captain raised his hand, ready to go to the line as he had many times before.

Only this time it was different.

“You realize you’re going to miss them, don’t you?” Rohlman said.

Darius McNeal nodded his head. He understood what had to be done.

The Barbs were playing a non-conference game on the road against Milwaukee Madison. It was the third meeting between the two schools.
The teams planned to get together after the game and share some pizzas and basketball-main_fullsoda. But the game itself between these friendly rivals almost never took place.

Hours earlier, the mother of Milwaukee Madison senior captain Johntel Franklin died at a local hospital. Carlitha Franklin in remission from five-year fight with cervical cancer hemorrhaged suddenly while Johntel was taking his college ACT exam.

Johntel and a few teammates were at the hospital late that afternoon when the life-support system was removed. His mom Carlitha was just 39 years old.

“She was young and they were real close,” said Milwaukee coach Aaron Womack Jr., who was at the hospital. “He was very distraught and it happened so suddenly he didn’t have time to grieve.”

Womack was going to cancel the game, but Franklin told him he wanted the team to play. And play they did, even though the game started late and Milwaukee Madison dressed only eight players.

Early in the second quarter, Womack saw someone out of the corner of his eye. It was Franklin, who came there directly from the hospital to root his teammates on.

The Knights had possession, so Womack called a time out. His players went over and hugged their grieving teammate. Fans came out of the stands to do the same.

“We got back to playing the game and I asked if he wanted to come and sit on the bench,” Womack said during a telephone interview.

“No,” Franklin replied. “I want to play.”

There was just one problem. Since Franklin wasn’t on the pre-game roster, putting him in meant drawing a technical foul that would give DeKalb two free throws.

Though it was a tight game, Womack was willing to give up the two points. It was more important to help his senior guard and co-captain deal with his grief by playing.

Over on the other bench, though, Rohlman wasn’t so willing to take them. He told the referees to forget the technical and just let Franklin play.

“I could hear them arguing for five to seven minutes, saying, `We’re not taking it, we’re not taking it,” Womack said. “The refs told them, no, that’s the rule. You have to take them.”

That’s when Rohlman asked for volunteers, and McNeal’s hand went up.

He went alone to the free throw line, dribbled the ball a couple of times, and looked at the rim.

His first attempt went about two feet, bouncing a couple of times as it rolled toward the end line. The second barely left his hand.

It didn’t take long for the Milwaukee players to figure out what was going on.

They stood and turned toward the DeKalb bench and started applauding the gesture of sportsmanship. Soon, so did everybody in the stands.

“I did it for the guy who lost his mom,” McNeal told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. “It was the right thing to do.”

They may not remember our record 20 years from now, but they’ll remember what happened in that gym that night – the life lesson Dave Rohlman, head coach of the opposing DeKalb team on what his players will take away from this experience.
Franklin would go on to score 10 points, and Milwaukee Madison broke open the game in the second half to win 62-47. Afterward, the teams went out for pizza, two players from each team sharing each pie.

Franklin stopped by briefly, thankful that his team was there for him.

“I got kind of emotional but it helped a lot just to play,” he said. “I felt like I had a lot of support out there.”

Carlitha Franklin’s funeral was last Friday, and the school turned out for her and her son. Cheerleaders came in uniform, and everyone from the principal and teachers to Johntel’s classmates were there.

“Even the cooks from school showed up,” Womack said. “It lets you know what kind of kid he is.”

“We maybe don’t have the best basketball players in the world but they go to class and take care of business,” Womack said. “We have a losing record but there’s life lessons going on, good ones.”

None so good, though, as the moment a team and a player decided there were more important things than winning and having good stats.

God bless you all.-thanks.

Yes, DeKalb would go home with a loss. But it was a trip they’ll never forget.

“This is something our kids will hold for a lifetime,” Rohlman said. “They may not remember our record 20 years from now, but they’ll remember what happened in that gym that night.”

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of Rivals High from Yahoo Sports.com and AP

Amid the grieving, a rare act of sportsmanship February 18, 2009.

highschool.rivals.com

Image basketball courtesy of Global Photo and i.chow.com

i.ehow.com/images/GlobalPhoto/basketball

Daily stress relief

Take a 10-30 minute walk every 15-ways-to-sneak-in-walking-time-afday.
Smile while you walk. It is the ultimate anti-depressant.
While walking find 3-5 new things about your area you have never seen before .

Give thanks for all the ways God is supporting your peace, health and healing inside and outside your body as you walk.

Breathe in slowly and deeply Then hold your breath for the same count.Then breathe out with that same even slow count. Repeat the same count for each step like 1000, 1001,1002,1003, 1004. 1005. Hold for the same count and exhale for the same count.
If any step is uncomfortable drop the count down a notch.
Caution;
If you have breathing or other medical challenges consult your physician before beginning any new exercises.

New mother feeling very light headed, tired have your heart checked

New Moms if you have any of the following reoccurring symptoms please call your doctor.

Symptoms

* Fatigue
* Feeling of racing heart or skipping beats (palpitations)New moms heart disease -Peripartum Cardiomyopathy
* Increased night-time urination (nocturia)
* Shortness of breath with activity and when laying flat
* Swelling of the ankles
Doctor’s exam may show Peripartum Cardiomyopathy

liver enlargment
neck veins swollen.
low Blood pressure worse stands up
Heart enlargement,
lungs/veins to lung congested
cardiac output/functioning decreased
heart failure

A real time case
Tanya Ginther, 26, had given birth to her second child just two months earlier, so she thought it was only natural to feel tired, and out of breath. But packing the car one day in the garage attached to her Bismarck, N.D., home, Tanya collapsed her heart had stopped without warning – a cardiac arrest.

Doctors later determined Tanya was suffering from a mysterious condition called Peripartum Cardiomyopathy (PC).
PC strikes as many as 3,000 new mothers in the United States every year, is characterized by symptoms that include fatigue and shortness of breath. No one is certain of its cause or why Peripartum Cardiomyopathy develops.

“The heart muscle weakens in the last months of pregnancy,” Sharonne Hayes, a doctor at the Mayo Clinic, told ABC News. “We don’t know what causes it. It could be inflammation, or a virus, or the changes in hormones.”

At a Bismarck, N.D., hospital, Tanya Ginther’s heart stopped, again and again. Doctors, shocking her back to life each time, She needed a heart pump. In a last attempt to save her life, the Mayo Clinic dispatched one of its “air ambulances,” a Learjet equipped with the latest emergency medical equipment, to lift Tanya to its hospital in Rochester, Minn.

But at an altitude of 30,000 feet, Tanya’s heart failed yet again. Today she is fine. She and her family are grateful she is one of the fortunate ones to survive. (1)

Cardiomyopathy occurs when there is damage to the heart. As a result, the heart muscle becomes weak and cannot pump blood efficiently. Decreased heart function affects the lungs, liver, and other body systems. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a form of dilated cardiomyopathy in which no other cause of heart dysfunction (weakened heart) can be identified.

In the United States, Peripartum Cardiomyopathy complicates 1 in every 1,300 – 4,000 deliveries. It may occur in childbearing women of any age, but it is most common after age 30.

Risk factors include obesity, having a personal history of cardiac disorders such as myocarditis, use of certain medications, smoking, alcoholism, multiple pregnancies, being African American, and being malnourished. (2)

Resources

1.Excerpts and video courtesy of ABCNews HeartHealth/story?id=6724565&page=1

2.Excerpts and Image courtesy of NIHMedline

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000188

Odor to make humans disappear- mosquitoes confusants

19-1The image at the right is an
electron micrograph of the head of a female Anopheles gambiae mosquito, showing the parts of olfactory appendages (antennae, maxillary palps and proboscis)

Dr. Leslie Vosshall and two colleagues at Rockefeller University published a series of experiments that seemed to settle the 50-year-old question of how the insect repellent DEET kept mosquitoes at bay (Science, 319:1838-42, 2008).

Vosshal explained their findings “It doesn’t smell bad to insects. It masks or inhibits their ability to smell you.”
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funded the research to understand how and why DEET works. This is critical to creating the next generation of chemicals, which may head off insect-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever.
Related Articles
Laurence Zwiebel of Vanderbilt University (also a Gates’ grantee) and  Ulrich Bernier of the US Department of Agriculture are not sure the findings just didn’t make sense, given everything they knew about this system

In Vosshall experiment,  the response of the mosquito’s olfactory neurons to two separate, attractive odors in human breath. Then, she combined each odorant with DEET in a single odor cartridge and noticed a smaller neural response. Vosshall believes DEET was blocking the mosquito’s olfactory co-receptor.
Another teams experiment another interpretation

Using gas chromatography, Leal confirmed his suspicions this year. When he repeated Vosshall’s experiment using separate odor cartridges that blended DEET and each attractive odor only at their tips, the mosquito’s neural response was no longer diminished. Then, Leal identified a DEET-sensitive odor receptor neuron and showed that mosquitoes avoid passing through a “curtain” of DEET vapors.
Leal’s paper surprised Vosshall, but is unconvinced by Leal’s results, and has been trying to reproduce the effect in her own lab. “Competition in science is good,” she says, “It can be difficult when it’s a small field, and this is a very small field.”

Genomic studies in 2005 have since shown that this co-receptor is found in insects ranging from mosquitoes to moths,  making humans invisible to insects. Using tissue cultures, she uses targeted drug discovery to screen 91,520 compounds from a chemical library, short-listing about 150 that she believes have the potential to be insect “confusants.”

Even Vosshall’s skeptics admit the confusant strategy is fundamentally sound. Zwiebel says his unpublished molecular work confirms the existence of confusants, but when it comes to DEET, he and Vosshall aren’t willing to budge. “We have agreed to disagree on the DEET story,” he says.

Resources

Smells funny? – Brendan Borrell  The Scientist.com Volume 23 | Issue 1 | Page 19.

http://www.the-scientist.com/2009/01/1/19/1/

Mosquitoes smell and avoid the insect repellent DEET – Leal and Zainulabeuddin Syed,  PNAS 105:13598-603, 2008 September 2008.


Image courtesy
of LJ Zwiebel, colorization by Dominic Doyle / Vanderbilt University