” Treating Autism with Craniosacral Therapy “

By Gloria Flores, CST-D guest author

What is Craniosacral Therapy?

Few body structures have more influence over your health and well-being than your central nervous system, and the body system that has the most impact on your central nervous system is your craniosacral system.  By helping the central nervous system to perform at its best, Craniosacral Therapy naturally eliminates pain and stress, strengthens your resistance to disease, and enhances your health and well-being.
Craniosacral Therapy is an alternative approach to traditional healthcare that was developed from clinical trials at Michigan State University beginning in 1975. At that time, Dr. John E. Upledger, D.O., O.M.M. led a team of anatomists, physiologists biophysicists and bioengineers to test and document the influence of therapy on the body’s craniosacral system – the bones, membranes, and fluid that surround and protect the brain and spinal cord.

How Can Craniosacral Therapy Help Autism?
Today there are a variety of treatments available for the treatment of Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorder, but Craniosacral Therapy has proven to be outstanding among popular methods of alternative treatment.

Dr. Carlos Pardo, researcher at John’s Hopkins University, has performed detailed analysis of Autism patients, used cerebrospinal fluid to evaluate markers of neuro-inflammation in patients with regressive forms of Autism. His research found increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory changes in the cerebrospinal fluid of the autistic patients studied.

These changes can compromise the craniosacral system causing loss of flexibility and probable inflammation of the membrane layers surrounding the brain. This can result in abnormal pressure changes within the brain, causing brain tissue congestion and toxicity.
Craniosacral Therapy focuses on balancing the flow of cerebrospinal fluid and restoring mobility to the membrane layers surrounding the brain, helping the brain flush toxins and inflammation out of brain tissue.  It gently and non-intrusively unlocks cerebrospinal fluid passageways along the length of the brain, spinal cord and central nervous system. This elevates biochemical processing, increasing the function of neurons and neurological pathways. Increased mobility of brain tissues and fluids helps decrease the abnormal strain the brain has been under. Brain cells are then able to better process and react to all sorts of information.  Craniosacral Therapy should be continued until the child reaches adulthood since there’s a tendency for the membranes to tighten as growth spurts occur.
Parents of children with Autism often report that after Craniosacral Therapy sessions their child is more relaxed, better to make eye contact, is more verbal, demonstrates improved socialization, and increased ability to express love and affection. Improved function of the craniosacral system has been shown to be beneficial in relieving typical autistic behaviors such as head banging, thumb sucking and toe walking. These behaviors can be either alleviated or diminished with Craniosacral Therapy because small changes in the craniosacral system can create even larger changes in the entire body.
Because of its positive effect on so many body systems, Craniosacral Therapy is now practiced by a wide variety of healthcare professionals, including Osteopaths, Chiropractors, Doctors of Oriental Medicine, Acupuncturists, Physical Therapists, Massage Therapists and other professional body workers.

About the author

Gloria Flores, CST-D is a diplomate level certified Craniosacral Therapist and a California State certified massage therapist, a certified Holistic Health Practitioner and author. She teaches Craniosacral Therapy to healthcare professionals and the public. Contact Gloria  and her Upledger profile
Gloria can be contacted by email at: gloria@craniosacralcare.com

Resources
Excerpts courtesy of Discover Craniosacral Therapy
Excerpts courtesy of  healing-arts.org
Excerpts courtesy of  Brain’s Immune System Triggered in Autism
Excerpts courtesy of  http://goo.gl/QP8lg

Image courtesy of  http://goo.gl/pGokN

“Loosening the bond of coke addiction”

A new cocaine vaccine is being tested in clinical trials. It block dopamine-transport receptors and the “high” it causes. “high.”
The vaccine consists of molecules of cocaine covalently bonded to a large carrier protein, a recombinant cholera toxin B subunit. The cholera subunit is harmless without the other part of the normal virulent cholera A subunit.
This carrier was chosen because that a cholera subunit vaccine has been administered to millions of people without any adverse effects,

Since Americans are rarely exposed to or even vaccinated against cholera, their immune defense system will probably launch a strong defense against this foreignthis protein and the attached cocaine molecule.

The carrier choice was dictated by the knowledge that a cholera vaccine made from this subunit has been administered to millions of people without any adverse effects, and by the fact that Americans are rarely exposed to or vaccinated against cholera, so most would likely mount a new and robust immune response to this protein and the attached cocaine molecule.

After intramuscular injection, the vaccine enters the bloodstream and triggers plasma cells to produce antibodies to the cocaine molecule as a component of the immunogenic cholera protein. This creates an army of antibodies that can latch onto free cocaine molecules in the bloodstream and, because they are too bulky to fit through tight junctions in blood vessels, prevent the drug from leaving the circulatory system and entering tissues and organs.

Since tiny cocaine molecules that are now bound to big antibodies can no longer cross the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where they would ordinarily block dopamine-transport receptors and cause the buildup of dopamine that users perceive as a “high.” Cocaine that is kept from reaching its “target” in the brain is prevented from triggering reward sensations. With continued, regular booster vaccinations, necessary because the antibody titer declines steeply about 3 months after reaching peak levels, the bonds of addiction may be loosened, giving addicts a stab at kicking their habit altogether.

Resources
Excerpts courtesy of  http://bit.ly/iP62jc

Image courtesy of  http://bit.ly/lQAu3w

"Hope for ADHD"

Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD or ADD) is a neurobehavioral developmental disorder that affecting about 3% to 5% of children globally.  About 2% to 16% of school aged children suffer from this misunderstood condition.  30% to 50% of those individuals diagnosed in childhood continuing to have symptoms into adulthood.
Children with ADHD usually have attentional problems and hyperactivity. Their can be a genetic component to this problem.
Children and adolescents with ADHD tend to develop strategies and coping mechanisms to deal with the stresses both physical, mental and emotional that their restlessness and easy distractibility often create. School life can be painful and unrewarding, because they are unable to focus long enough to use the high intelligence they have. Misunderstood and with an educational and work environment that often is not organized or supported properly to nourish success, these children often do not receive help they need to succeed. Then the challenged and emotional  distress is carried over into adulthood with  4.7 percent of American adults thought to be living with ADHD.
ADHD is diagnosed more often in boys as in girls though studies suggest this discrepancy may be due to subjective bias of referring teachers.
Hope

ADHD management traditionally includes medications, behavior modifications, lifestyle changes, and counseling.  However, their are integrated medicine therapies such as homeopathy, neuro-emotional acu-non therapy, nutritional support and supplements, to name a few. Contact Complementary Medicine Association for more information.
A combination of individualized therapies can release the physical, emotional and neural stress that has built up within these individuals so they can reach their potential.
Resources
Excerpts
courtesy of  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperactivity
Excerpts courtesy of  http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/adhd/DS00275/
Excerpts courtesy of  http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/guide/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd

"Frankincense shows potential for use in treating bladder cancer"

Researchers are finding a plant extract from the Boswellia carteri, frankincense can kill cancer cells in a test tube (in vitro) without effectively damaging the healthy DNA of the normal bladder cells according to the BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Association.

Frankincense oil derived from Boswellia carteri has been found to induce cancer tumor cell cytotoxicity

Frankincense plant is found in Africa, India, and the Middle East. Historically, frankincense oil has been used in incense and perfumes for thousands of years. Frankincense oil is prepared from aromatic hardened gum resins obtained by tapping Boswellia trees. It is now known that Boswellic acid seems to be the active agent that is toxic to the bladder cancer cells J82 cells without harming the normal bladder urothelial UROtsa cells. Through a range of concentration, frankincense oil suppressed cancer cell viability in bladder transitional carcinoma J82 cells but does not harm the UROtsa cells. Gene expression analysis shows that frankincense oil activates genes that are responsible for cell cycle arrest, cell growth suppression, and apoptosis (cell death) in J82 cells. However, frankincense oil-induced cell death in J82 cells did not result in DNA fragmentation.

Conclusion
Frankincense oil appears to distinguish cancerous from normal bladder cells and suppress cancer cell viability. Microarray and bioinformatics analysis proposed multiple pathways that can be activated by frankincense oil to induce bladder cancer cell death.
Frankincense oil might become a healthy alternative adjunct therapy for winning the challenge of bladder cancer.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of http://www.biomedcentral.com
Image courtesy of http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=frankincense+tree&FORM=BIFD

Odor to make humans disappear- mosquitoes confusants

19-1The image at the right is an
electron micrograph of the head of a female Anopheles gambiae mosquito, showing the parts of olfactory appendages (antennae, maxillary palps and proboscis)

Dr. Leslie Vosshall and two colleagues at Rockefeller University published a series of experiments that seemed to settle the 50-year-old question of how the insect repellent DEET kept mosquitoes at bay (Science, 319:1838-42, 2008).

Vosshal explained their findings “It doesn’t smell bad to insects. It masks or inhibits their ability to smell you.”
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funded the research to understand how and why DEET works. This is critical to creating the next generation of chemicals, which may head off insect-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever.
Related Articles
Laurence Zwiebel of Vanderbilt University (also a Gates’ grantee) and  Ulrich Bernier of the US Department of Agriculture are not sure the findings just didn’t make sense, given everything they knew about this system

In Vosshall experiment,  the response of the mosquito’s olfactory neurons to two separate, attractive odors in human breath. Then, she combined each odorant with DEET in a single odor cartridge and noticed a smaller neural response. Vosshall believes DEET was blocking the mosquito’s olfactory co-receptor.
Another teams experiment another interpretation

Using gas chromatography, Leal confirmed his suspicions this year. When he repeated Vosshall’s experiment using separate odor cartridges that blended DEET and each attractive odor only at their tips, the mosquito’s neural response was no longer diminished. Then, Leal identified a DEET-sensitive odor receptor neuron and showed that mosquitoes avoid passing through a “curtain” of DEET vapors.
Leal’s paper surprised Vosshall, but is unconvinced by Leal’s results, and has been trying to reproduce the effect in her own lab. “Competition in science is good,” she says, “It can be difficult when it’s a small field, and this is a very small field.”

Genomic studies in 2005 have since shown that this co-receptor is found in insects ranging from mosquitoes to moths,  making humans invisible to insects. Using tissue cultures, she uses targeted drug discovery to screen 91,520 compounds from a chemical library, short-listing about 150 that she believes have the potential to be insect “confusants.”

Even Vosshall’s skeptics admit the confusant strategy is fundamentally sound. Zwiebel says his unpublished molecular work confirms the existence of confusants, but when it comes to DEET, he and Vosshall aren’t willing to budge. “We have agreed to disagree on the DEET story,” he says.

Resources

Smells funny? – Brendan Borrell  The Scientist.com Volume 23 | Issue 1 | Page 19.

http://www.the-scientist.com/2009/01/1/19/1/

Mosquitoes smell and avoid the insect repellent DEET – Leal and Zainulabeuddin Syed,  PNAS 105:13598-603, 2008 September 2008.


Image courtesy
of LJ Zwiebel, colorization by Dominic Doyle / Vanderbilt University

Surgeon General's New Family Health History Tool

Surgeon General’s New Family Health History Tool Is Released

Karen Hendricks of the D.C. Office of the AAP shares the following with you.
Tuesday, January 13, 2009
Contact: OPHS Press Office
(202) 205-0143
Surgeon General’s New Family Health History Tool Is Released, Ready for “21st Century Medicine”

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services today released an updated and improved version of the Surgeon General’s Internet-based family health history tool. The new tool makes it easier for consumers to assemble and share family health history information.  It can also help practitioners make better use of health history information so they can provide more informed and personalized care for their patients.

“This valuable tool can put family histories to work to improve patient well-being and the quality of care,” HHS Secretary Mike Leavitt said.  “The tool is built on health information technology standards that make it more convenient for consumers and more useful for practitioners.  It is ready for use in electronic health records.  And its software code will be openly available to other health organizations, so they can customize and build on its standards base.”

“Family history has always been an important part of good health care, but it has been underused,” said Acting Surgeon General Steven Galson, a rear admiral in the U.S. Public Health Service.  “Today, with our growing knowledge of genetics, family history is becoming even more important.  The new tool will help consumers and clinicians alike.  It will also serve as a platform for developing new risk assessment software that will help in screening and prevention of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and other conditions.”

Key features of the new version of the Surgeon General’s My Family Health Portrait include:

  • Consumers can access the tool easily on the Web.  Completing the family health history profile typically takes 15-20 minutes.  Consumers should not have to keep filling out different health history forms for different practitioners.  Information is easily updated or amended.
  • Consumer control and privacy – The family health history tool gives consumers access to software that builds a family health tree. But the personal information entered during the use of the tool is not kept by a government or other site.  Consumers download their information to their own computer.  From there, they have control over how the information is used.
  • Sharing – Because the information is in electronic form, it can be easily shared with relatives or with practitioners.  Relatives can add to the information, and a special re-indexing feature helps relatives easily start their own history based on data in a history they received. Practitioners can help consumers understand and use their information.
  • EHR-ready, Decision support-ready – Because the new tool is based on commonly used standards, the information it generates is ready for use in electronic health records and personal health records.  It can be used in developing clinical decision software, which helps the practitioner understand and make the most use of family health information.
  • Personalization of care – Family history information can help alert practitioners and patients to patient-specific susceptibilities.
  • Downloadable, customizable – The code for the new tool is openly available for others to adopt.  Health organizations are invited to download and customize, using the tool under their own brand and adding features that serve their needs.  Developers may also use the code to create new risk assessment software tools.

The first adopter of the HHS-developed tool is the National Institute of Genomic Medicine of Mexico (INMEGEN).  Dr. Gerardo Jimenez-Sanchez, director general of the institute, will release the Mexican Spanish-language version of the tool in Mexico City this month.  The Mexican family health history tool will be available on the INMEGEN Web site, http://www.inmegen.gob.mx.

The Indian Health Service, an agency of HHS that was instrumental in developing the new Surgeon General tool, will also adopt it into the IHS care system.

One organization saying it will link to the new tool is the Lance Armstrong Foundation (LAF), a cancer advocacy organization.  “A strong family health history tool can be an important element for guiding medical decision-making, especially in the area of cancer screening, prevention and early detection,” said LAF founder and chairman Lance Armstrong.  “This tool will further the capabilities of electronic health records and takes a significant step toward improving clinical care.”

The Surgeon General’s My Family Health Portrait was originally launched in 2004, but the first version was not standards-based.  The new tool was developed under Secretary Leavitt’s Initiative on Personalized Health Care.  It will be hosted by the National Cancer Institute, where the caBIG® initiative is pioneering health IT networks and software sharing.  A ready process for organizations to download the family health history code is at https://gforge.nci.nih.gov/projects/fhh.

The Surgeon General’s new My Family Health Portrait tool is located at https://familyhistory.hhs.gov.   In addition, a presentation of sample risk assessment tools under development can be viewed at http://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=7297 .

Designing pediatric units for healing

Could it be that neuroscientists and architectural design firms are finally working together to improve img_742998_1_0child-hospitalmedical staff performance and the healing of the patients? Those three ideas of health, healing and environmental impact is an old concept in holistic medicine, but finally provable to western neuroscientists. All can now begin to benefit.

A U.S. architectural firm has announced plans to work with neuroscientists to identify healthcare facility designs that promote performance and healing.

HMC Architects of Ontario, Calif., says it will work with a team of neuroscientists from the University of California-San Diego, citing recent studies showing building design, color and lighting affect patient health.

“Neuroscience provides a means for us to measure how the brain, body and building interact,” said Eve Edelstein, a UCSD neurophysiologist. “Neuroscience gives us the tools to understand how the engagement of our senses in architectural space influences our emotions, behavior and health itself.”

To measure brain responses to simulated building designs, Edelstein is using a virtual reality device called the StarCave, developed by UCSD, and resembling a small Imax theater.

“We’ve synchronized the technology in the cave so that we can record a person’s brain waves at the same time they’re moving about in a simulated architectural environment,” Edelstein said. “So with this technology, we can test out architectural designs without having to build them. We can test which features work and which features don’t work by measuring the influence of architectural features on mental and physical function.”

Recently a scientific review of 320 evidence-based design studies in the academic literature that apply to the field of pediatrics, concluded that the

physical environment of health care settings affects the clinical, physiological, psychosocial and safety outcomes among child patients and families.

The need to

minimizing or eliminating the harmful effects of such environmental factors as loud noise, high light levels and infectious pathogens should be the goal of children’s hospitals and other types of hospitals providing pediatric services. In particular, the neonatal intensive care unit has been the focus of many interventions proven effective in improving infant health outcomes.
Examples of proven low cost design recommendations implementable at any time are:

– Hand washing dispensers at each bedside and in all high patient volume areas
– Incubator noise reduction measures (earmuffs, sound absorbing panels) in the NICU
– Circadian (cycled) lighting in the NICU
– Artwork and virtual reality images to provide positive distractions

Examples of proven moderate to high cost design interventions implementable during renovation or new construction include:

– Single family patient rooms
– Adequate space for families to stay overnight in patient rooms
– Accessible indoor or outdoor gardens
– Visual access and accessibility to patients (e.g. through decentralized nurses’ stations)
– HEPA filtration for immune compromised patients

“The exciting news is that well designed hospitals based on evidence can actually increase patient safety and quality, reduce anxiety and stress for child patients and their families and also improve working conditions for hospital staff,” said Lawrence McAndrews, president and CEO of NACHRI.

“Bottom line is this report challenges children’s hospitals and adult hospitals that serve children to evaluate their built spaces and implement design interventions that can help their pediatric patients heal.”

1. Neuroscientists to help design hospitals – Staff Writers San Diego (UPI) Nov 13, 2008
http://www.interndaily.com/reports/Neuroscientists_to_help_design_hospitals_999.html

2. Hospital Design Can Heal According to First Comprehensive Report on Impact of Physical Environment on Child Patients Levent OZLER May 10, 2008  http://www.dexigner.com/design_news/hospital-design-can-heal-according-to-first-comprehensive-report.html

image courtesy of http://search.live.com/images/results.aspx?q=Medical&form=MXCA00&kwid=7f83624462863621dd19e66fc85a66bb

Immune system replacement or death by own cells

Why does the immune systems of some middle aged women suddenly turn against turn against them? Why are middle-aged women most vulnerable?

One woman Bari Martz began gasping for breath, her fingers turned blue and her hands became clentched with her joints so stiffened that she couldn’t even open her hands.  Death could be a consequence if something radical did not happen quickly
Doctors stored her own stem cells from her blood.  They destroyed her original misguided immune system and infused her own cultured stem cells.

Now two years later Bari rejuvenated immune system is helping her lungs and joints continue to heal; their functioning is greatly improved.

Scleroderma was the diagnosis. It is one of a family of autoimmune disorders that causes the body’s immune system to begin destroying its own cells causing thickening skin, stiffening joints, destroying blood vessels, and sometimes causing death through kidney and lung failure.

“The notion that more immuno-suppression is better is somewhat logical,” says Dr. Ellen Goldmuntz of the National Institutes of Health, which is funding some of the research. “The question’s how best to do it.”
Immune System Transplant Saves Woman – LAURAN NEERGAARD

http://news.aol.com/health/article/immune-system-transplant-saves-woman/183862

New World – New Me

“We are at a stage in human history … we’re headed now will be different because we have exhausted planetary space and human space for us to continue to look at things through material …(eyes-editor’s note). We need to face the way we used the world for our gains, pleasures, satisfactions. … And unless we want to live in terror for the rest of our lives, we need to change our view about acquiring things. We have the opportunity to take a great leap forward in these very challenging times. We need to change our institutions and ourselves… We need to launch our imaginations beyond the thinking of the past. We need to discern who we are and expand on our humanness and sacredness. That’s how we change the world, which happens because WE will be the change.”

Dr. Grace Lee Boggs, 93, a long-time Detroit political and labor activist, author, and philosopher.
Source: http://www.organicconsumers.org/articles/article_13671.cfm