“Healthy company = less stressed out workers = more $$”- Comp Med Assoc.

Stress has been called the “health epidemic of the 21st century” by the World Health Organization and is estimated to cost American businesses up to $300 billion a year.”

Here are a few ways that workplace stress the costs us:

  • 300% increase in behavioral disability claims in one decade.
  • 70 % of all visits to the family doctor.
  • 30% rise in disability claims.Statistics adapted from http://www.stress.org/workplace-stress/Stress

Isn’t it time we charge a few things?

Wouldn’t you like to feel confident that the place you work was taking steps to reduce your stress?

Let us know with a comment or a call.

 

 

 

“Angry leave it for the dogs”

“If your dog doesn’t like someone you probably shouldn’t either.”
– Unknown

Has your behavior gone to the dogs?

Even if you are in an angry mood never bark at anyone. It is bad for your image and makes communication tougher.-MW

“The external expression of anger can be found in facial expressions, body language, physiological responses, and at times in public acts of aggression. Humans and animals for example make loud sounds, attempt to look physically larger, bare their teeth, and stare. The behaviors associated with anger are designed to warn aggressors to stop their threatening behavior. Rarely does a physical altercation occur without the prior expression of anger by at least one of the participants. While most of those who experience anger explain its arousal as a result of “what has happened to them,” psychologists point out that an angry person can be very well mistaken because anger causes a loss in self-monitoring capacity and objective observability.”

Speak from your heart so anger never overruns you.

Image courtesy of http://bit.ly/lMjxfL

Excerpts courtesy of http://bit.ly/igyFIB

“Where did my anger come from?”

Conventional thinking is that it is good and healthy to express anger. While withholding anger is certainly not in anyone’s best interest, using anger to get others to change their behavior carries with it many negative consequences.

I asked myself, “Where is my anger coming from? ” Then i began to review when I got angry and observed :

My anger seemed to be deeply ingrained in my system and it
Was I born with this anger? – my intuition said no.
Was it a learned response and if so to what? Yes, I learned to use anger to get my way and to protect my sensitive nature from my inner feelings of fear, pain, helplessness
How did I feel about myself when I acted out in anger? When I asked that question I learned that I felt at that moment I was not good enough, lovable or adequate.

So actually, in truth my anger is an expression of my weakness and confusion, not my strength. Being afraid to show my vulnerable feelings is a reflection of my fear that I might be judged by others, and more importantly by myself as weak, unmanly, bad, wrong, stupid, or that I can’t handle my softer feelings and I will be rejected, or that I will be manipulated into doing things that I really don’t want to do.

I have come to understand that when my anger is manipulative it does not contain compassion and a desire to learn and therefore, is not coming from my heart and I am not in oneness.

This is the first in a series of articles and discussions with Dr. Jordan Paul, PhD.
Excerpts from Dr. Paul’s article ANGER or REAL STRENGTH

Image courtesy of  http://bit.ly/hqLR6x

Rarified sportmanship -people helping people

There were no other options for this coach. It didn’t matter that his DeKalb, Ill., High School basketball team had ridden a bus two and a half hours to get to Milwaukee, then waited another hour past game time to play. Didn’t matter that the game was close, or that this was a chance to beat a big city team.

Johntel Franklin scored 10 points in the game following the loss of his mother.
Something else was on Dave Rohlman’s mind when he asked for a volunteer to shoot two free throws awarded his team on a technical foul in the second quarter. His senior captain raised his hand, ready to go to the line as he had many times before.

Only this time it was different.

“You realize you’re going to miss them, don’t you?” Rohlman said.

Darius McNeal nodded his head. He understood what had to be done.

The Barbs were playing a non-conference game on the road against Milwaukee Madison. It was the third meeting between the two schools.
The teams planned to get together after the game and share some pizzas and basketball-main_fullsoda. But the game itself between these friendly rivals almost never took place.

Hours earlier, the mother of Milwaukee Madison senior captain Johntel Franklin died at a local hospital. Carlitha Franklin in remission from five-year fight with cervical cancer hemorrhaged suddenly while Johntel was taking his college ACT exam.

Johntel and a few teammates were at the hospital late that afternoon when the life-support system was removed. His mom Carlitha was just 39 years old.

“She was young and they were real close,” said Milwaukee coach Aaron Womack Jr., who was at the hospital. “He was very distraught and it happened so suddenly he didn’t have time to grieve.”

Womack was going to cancel the game, but Franklin told him he wanted the team to play. And play they did, even though the game started late and Milwaukee Madison dressed only eight players.

Early in the second quarter, Womack saw someone out of the corner of his eye. It was Franklin, who came there directly from the hospital to root his teammates on.

The Knights had possession, so Womack called a time out. His players went over and hugged their grieving teammate. Fans came out of the stands to do the same.

“We got back to playing the game and I asked if he wanted to come and sit on the bench,” Womack said during a telephone interview.

“No,” Franklin replied. “I want to play.”

There was just one problem. Since Franklin wasn’t on the pre-game roster, putting him in meant drawing a technical foul that would give DeKalb two free throws.

Though it was a tight game, Womack was willing to give up the two points. It was more important to help his senior guard and co-captain deal with his grief by playing.

Over on the other bench, though, Rohlman wasn’t so willing to take them. He told the referees to forget the technical and just let Franklin play.

“I could hear them arguing for five to seven minutes, saying, `We’re not taking it, we’re not taking it,” Womack said. “The refs told them, no, that’s the rule. You have to take them.”

That’s when Rohlman asked for volunteers, and McNeal’s hand went up.

He went alone to the free throw line, dribbled the ball a couple of times, and looked at the rim.

His first attempt went about two feet, bouncing a couple of times as it rolled toward the end line. The second barely left his hand.

It didn’t take long for the Milwaukee players to figure out what was going on.

They stood and turned toward the DeKalb bench and started applauding the gesture of sportsmanship. Soon, so did everybody in the stands.

“I did it for the guy who lost his mom,” McNeal told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. “It was the right thing to do.”

They may not remember our record 20 years from now, but they’ll remember what happened in that gym that night – the life lesson Dave Rohlman, head coach of the opposing DeKalb team on what his players will take away from this experience.
Franklin would go on to score 10 points, and Milwaukee Madison broke open the game in the second half to win 62-47. Afterward, the teams went out for pizza, two players from each team sharing each pie.

Franklin stopped by briefly, thankful that his team was there for him.

“I got kind of emotional but it helped a lot just to play,” he said. “I felt like I had a lot of support out there.”

Carlitha Franklin’s funeral was last Friday, and the school turned out for her and her son. Cheerleaders came in uniform, and everyone from the principal and teachers to Johntel’s classmates were there.

“Even the cooks from school showed up,” Womack said. “It lets you know what kind of kid he is.”

“We maybe don’t have the best basketball players in the world but they go to class and take care of business,” Womack said. “We have a losing record but there’s life lessons going on, good ones.”

None so good, though, as the moment a team and a player decided there were more important things than winning and having good stats.

God bless you all.-thanks.

Yes, DeKalb would go home with a loss. But it was a trip they’ll never forget.

“This is something our kids will hold for a lifetime,” Rohlman said. “They may not remember our record 20 years from now, but they’ll remember what happened in that gym that night.”

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of Rivals High from Yahoo Sports.com and AP

Amid the grieving, a rare act of sportsmanship February 18, 2009.

highschool.rivals.com

Image basketball courtesy of Global Photo and i.chow.com

i.ehow.com/images/GlobalPhoto/basketball

Daily stress relief

Take a 10-30 minute walk every 15-ways-to-sneak-in-walking-time-afday.
Smile while you walk. It is the ultimate anti-depressant.
While walking find 3-5 new things about your area you have never seen before .

Give thanks for all the ways God is supporting your peace, health and healing inside and outside your body as you walk.

Breathe in slowly and deeply Then hold your breath for the same count.Then breathe out with that same even slow count. Repeat the same count for each step like 1000, 1001,1002,1003, 1004. 1005. Hold for the same count and exhale for the same count.
If any step is uncomfortable drop the count down a notch.
Caution;
If you have breathing or other medical challenges consult your physician before beginning any new exercises.