“Biophoton light -what is it?”

All living things run on light particles excited by photons.

An interview with Professor Popp describes his findings about the subatomic light particles and how they are related to healthy cell activity. “There are 100,000 chemical reactions per minute in a healthy cell regulated by photon light.

The better the transmission of information in coherent light the more calmness, clarity and health the cell is capable of. In a nanosecond one photon can trigger a hundred thousand chemical reactions in a cell.

Thanks to Youtube and Dr. Popp

“Bacteria die on cicada wings-new treatment?”

Researchers have found that cicada wing structure able to kill bacteria on contact.
Researchers find cicada wing structure able to kill bacteria on contact
Below is an enlarged Cicada (P. claripennis) wing surface. Credit: Biophysical Journal, doi:10.1016/j.bpj.2012.12.046 (Phys.org)
A combined team of researchers from Spain and Australia believe their research shows the first known Researchers find cicada wing structure able to kill bacteria on contact (w/ video)occurence of a natural chitin biomaterial that can kill bacteria on contact. It seems to kill the bacteria through simple surface contact.
(Could this be a natural “cure for Monsanto ruling the world?- editor’s note.
Scientists in Biophysical Journal explained howthe Clanger cicadas have nanoscale sized pillars on their wings that trap and slowly kill bacteria by pulling their cells apart.  Sounds like the basis for the next Sci-Fi movie blockbuster.

“HUMANITARIAN COALITION gets $8.5 million from Canada”

HUMANITARIAN COALITION members receive $8.5 million from Government of Canada’s International Development Agency

The HUMANITARIAN COALITION wishes to express its gratitude to the Government of Canada and the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) for its contribution of $8.5 million for relief efforts in Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia, announced today.
The money, which is part of the Government’s pledge to aid relief efforts in the Horn of Africa, will go to three of the HUMANITARIAN COALITION’s five members: CARE Canada, Oxfam Canada and Plan Canada.
Thanks to the generosity of Canadians, the HUMANITARIAN COALITION’s members, which also include Oxfam-Québec and Save the Children Canada, have to date raised a combined $6.5 million. With the announcement of these contributions from CIDA, the HUMANITARIAN COALITION members have received a total of $15 million for urgent relief efforts in East Africa.
“The generosity of individual Canadians and the Government of Canada is critical to the work we are doing together in East Africa,” said Kevin McCort, President and CEO of CARE Canada and Chair of the HUMANITARIAN COALITION. “From water point rehabilitation and distributing water treatment chemicals, to emergency aid and advocacy, to providing supplementary food for children and mothers, we are reaching hundreds of thousands of people. But our work is far from done. We encourage Canadians to continue to donate so we can reach the millions more who are affected by the crisis.”
“We hope that Canadians will follow the government’s example and continue to respond to this crisis as we get into back-to-school season,” said Nicolas Moyer, Executive Director, the HUMANITARIAN COALITION.
The Government of Canada had previously announced that it would match, dollar-for-dollar, donations made by individual Canadians in a dedicated Relief Fund. The donation matching period ends on September 16.
As a joint Canadian approach to humanitarian response, the members of the HUMANITARIAN COALITION work together during times of international humanitarian disaster to ensure help gets to those who need it most. When a global emergency strikes, member agencies don’t compete for funds and broadcast slots, they focus on helping survivors of the disaster.  With one call centre, one phone number and a joint website, donating to agencies that reach women, children and men with emergency supplies is easy for Canadians.
With a combined presence in more than 120 countries, the joint efforts by the members of the HUMANITARIAN COALITION provide a widespread and effective response to emergencies.

God bless you all.

Thanks for this generous donation.

Reprinted newswire.ca

“Last antibiotic standing-losing to Gonorrhea”

The last line of defense for treating gonorrhea is crumbling, according to an article published in the July 8 issue of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Cephalosporins, the last class of antibiotics that treat gonorrhea, seem to be losing their effectiveness as the pathogen quickly evolves to bypass the antibiotic.

After 10 years of study, the CDC researchers studying gonorrhea cultures show that higher doses of antibiotics are needed to inhibit growth in the lab The gonorrhea samples collected through the CDC’s Gonococcal Isolate Surveillance Project from male patients in 30 US cities. Close to 6000 isolates were collected each year.

A pattern of emerging resistance is developing says Gail Bolan, MD, director of CDC’s Division of Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention.

Although no treatment failures have been reported yet in the United States, there have been reports from Asia and other parts of the world suggesting gonorrhea’s declining susceptibility to cephalosporin, said Hillard Weinstock, MD, MPH, from the same division.

At an Impasse

Historically, since the 1930s and 1940s, antibiotics have treated gonorrhea. However, during the past 40 years, the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae has developed resistance to several drugs, including sulfonamides, penicillin, and tetracycline. As recently as 2007, the CDC stopped recommending any fluoroquinolone regimens to treat gonorrhea, leaving cephalosporins the last class of antibiotics standing.

The CDC is down to recommending a cephalosporin (cefixime or ceftriaxone), along with a macrolide antibiotic, preferably azithromycin. Ceftriaxone is the most effective cephalosporin for treating gonorrhea, and azithromycin is better than doxycycline for dual therapy with ceftriaxone, the CDC notes. (Dosing recommendations are available in the article.)

Gonorrhea is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases. Among serious health consequences, it can lead to infertility in women and increase a person’s risk of acquiring HIV.

Given the possibility of rising resistance, clinicians should be on the lookout for treatment failures, Dr. Bolan said, which will show up as persistent symptoms or a positive follow-up test despite treatment with CDC-recommended antibiotics. Clinicians should also obtain specimens for gonococcal culture from patients whose treatments may have failed. “You need to find labs that are still doing the [gonococcal] culture,” she said.

CDC Recommendations

The CDC recommends that individual providers:

  • promptly treat all patients diagnosed with gonorrhea according to CDC Treatment Guidelines,
  • obtain cultures to test for decreased susceptibility from any patients with suspected or documented gonorrhea treatment failures, and
  • report any suspected treatment failure to local or state public health officials within 24 hours, helping to ensure that any future resistance is recognized early.

Clinicians who care for patients with gonorrhea, especially men who have sex with men in the western United States, should consider having patients return 1 week after treatment for test-of-cure with culture, preferably, or with nucleic acid amplification tests. The CDC report notes that the pattern of cephalosporin susceptibility in the West and among men who have sex with men during 2009 to 2010 resembles the drop in effectiveness observed earlier when a fluoroquinolone-resistant N gonorrhoeae emerged in the United States.

Although Dr. Bolan said she was not aware of any new drug development in the pipeline, the CDC and the National Institutes of Health are running a treatment trial on existing drugs: gentamicin, azithromycin, and gemifloxacin. The trial is expected to yield results by late 2012, said Bob Kirkcaldy, MD, MPH, from the CDC’s Office of Workforce Development and Division of STD Prevention.

“We really do want to have more treatment trials so that we have more treatment options down the pike,” Dr. Bolan said.

However, the development of new antibiotics is unlikely, according to Brad Spellberg, MD, author of Rising Plague: The Global Threat from Deadly Bacteria and Our Dwindling Arsenal to Fight Them. A fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America who sits on its antimicrobial availability taskforce, Dr. Spellberg characterized the next several decades as “a very barren period of time” in terms of antibiotics development.

Dr. Spellberg offered 3 reasons to explain his outlook: First, there is a significant scientific challenge. After 60 years of antibiotic discovery, all the low-hanging fruit has been plucked, and developing new antibiotics would be difficult. Second, pharmaceutical companies have found that they make much more money off drugs that target chronic illnesses, not ones consumers will take for only 14 days. Third, “nobody even knows how to do drug trials for antibiotics anymore,” Dr. Spellberg said, and the US Food and Drug Administration’s requirements, he explained, are unclear, infeasible, and/or unreasonable.

“There’s never going to be an endgame to this,” he said. Industry, he predicted, will exit antibiotic development. “It doesn’t make enough money for them, and the regulatory morass exacerbates the problem.” Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2011:60;873-877. Full text

What are the signs and symptoms of gonorrhea?

Some men with gonorrhea may have no symptoms at all. However, some men have signs or symptoms that appear one to fourteen days after infection. Symptoms and signs include a burning sensation when urinating, or a white, yellow, or green discharge from the penis. Sometimes men with gonorrhea get painful or swollen testicles.

In women, the symptoms of gonorrhea are often mild, but most women who are infected have no symptoms. Even when a woman has symptoms, they can be so non-specific as to be mistaken for a bladder or vaginal infection. The initial symptoms and signs in women include a painful or burning sensation when urinating, increased vaginal discharge, or vaginal bleeding between periods. Women with gonorrhea are at risk of developing serious complications from the infection, regardless of the presence or severity of symptoms.

Symptoms of rectal infection in both men and women may include discharge, anal itching, soreness, bleeding, or painful bowel movements. Rectal infection also may cause no symptoms. Infections in the throat may cause a sore throat, but usually causes no symptoms.

What are the complications of gonorrhea?

Untreated gonorrhea can cause serious and permanent health problems in both women and men.

In women, gonorrhea is a common cause of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). About 750,000 women each year in the United States develop PID. The symptoms may be quite mild or can be very severe and can include abdominal pain and fever. PID can lead to internal abscesses (pus-filled “pockets” that are hard to cure) and long-lasting, chronic pelvic pain. PID can damage the fallopian tubes enough to cause infertility or increase the risk of ectopic pregnancy. Ectopic pregnancy is a life-threatening condition in which a fertilized egg grows outside the uterus, usually in a fallopian tube.

In men, gonorrhea can cause epididymitis, a painful condition of the ducts attached to the testicles that may lead to infertility if left untreated.

Gonorrhea can spread to the blood or joints. This condition can be life threatening. In addition, people with gonorrhea can more easily contract HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. HIV-infected people with gonorrhea can transmit HIV more easily to someone else than if they did not have gonorrhea.

How does gonorrhea affect a pregnant woman and her baby?

If a pregnant woman has gonorrhea, she may give the infection to her baby as the baby passes through the birth canal during delivery. This can cause blindness, joint infection, or a life-threatening blood infection in the baby. Treatment of gonorrhea as soon as it is detected in pregnant women will reduce the risk of these complications. Pregnant women should consult a health care provider for appropriate examination, testing, and treatment, as necessary.

Alternative Health Care

Natural medicine’s approach to treating all diseases is to look at the whole person and provide treatment that is specific to that person. Through individualized care in classical homeopathy, nutrition, herbal,oriental and Ayurvedic medicines and stress management care, possibly coupled with tradition drugs a person has the best opportunity to heal, because the body is not simply overwhelmed with a chemical antibiotic in hopes of repeatedly and blindly trying to drive the invader out of the body. Overwhelming the delicate systems of the body with chemicals only surpresses the symptoms of the disease and creates deeper pathology. (For more information-Mary Wolken-editor CMA)

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of  http://goo.gl/D6iqt

“Health risks Benadryl + diphenhydramine”

Drugs commonly taken for a variety of common medical conditions negatively affect your brain, causing long term cognitive impairment. They include such common over-the-counter brands as Benadryl (or Dimedrol in other countries), Dramamine, Excedrin PM, Nytol, Sominex, Tylenol PM, Midol PM and Advil PM though some Unisom products contain doxylamine instead.
Other anticholinergic drugs, such as Paxil, Detrol, Demerol and Elavil are available only by prescription.
One of the oldest antihistamines on the market Benadryl is more effective than even some of the latest prescription drugs. It is frequently used to stop or reduce the uncomfortable itchy and inflammation associated with an allergic reaction. It is fast and often effective at reversing the sometimes dangerous effects of a massive histamine release.
On the other side of this drug’s picture are adverse side effects often worse and more life threatening in children and the elderly or those chronically ill.
Diphenhydramine works by blocking the effect of histamine at H1 receptor sites. This results in effects such as the increase of vascular smooth muscle contraction, thus reducing the redness, hyperthermia and edema that occurs during an inflammatory reaction. In addition, by blocking the H1 receptor on peripheral nociceptors, diphenhydramine decreases their sensitization and consequently reduces itching that is associated with an allergic reaction.
Benadryl is the oldest antihistamine, diphenhydramine, is a potent anticholinergic agent.
The possible effects of Diphenhydramine include:

Ataxia; loss of coordination
Decreased mucus production in the nose and throat; consequent dry, sore throat
Xerostomia or dry-mouth with possible acceleration of dental caries
Cessation of perspiration; consequent decreased epidermal thermal dissipation leading to warm, blotchy, or red skin
Increased body temperature
Pupil dilation (mydriasis); consequent sensitivity to bright light (photophobia)
Loss of accommodation (loss of focusing ability, blurred vision — cycloplegia)
Double-vision (diplopia)
Increased heart rate (tachycardia)
Tendency to be easily startled
Urinary retention
Diminished bowel movement, sometimes ileus – (decreases motility via the vagus nerve)
Increased intraocular pressure; dangerous for people with narrow-angle glaucoma
Shaking
Possible effects in the central nervous system resemble those associated with delirium, and may include:
Confusion
Disorientation
Agitation
Euphoria or dysphoria
Respiratory depression
Memory problems
Inability to concentrate
Wandering thoughts; inability to sustain a train of thought
Incoherent speech
Wakeful myoclonic jerking
Unusual sensitivity to sudden sounds
Illogical thinking
Photophobia
Visual disturbances
Periodic flashes of light
Periodic changes in visual field
Visual snow
Restricted or “tunnel vision”
Visual, auditory, or other sensory hallucinations
Warping or waving of surfaces and edges
Textured surfaces
“Dancing” lines; “spiders”, insects; form constants
Lifelike objects indistinguishable from reality
Hallucinated presence of people not actually there
Rarely: seizures, coma, and death

Since 2002, the US FDA requires special labeling warning against using multiple products that contain diphenhydramine. Diphenhydramine has been shown to build tolerance against its sedation effectiveness very quickly, with placebo-like results after a third day of common dosage.

Caution:

Severe reactions (children) to diphenhydramine are documented, particularly amongst children, and it may cause excitation instead of sedation.
Severe reactions (elderly) are also common in the elderly.Because of potential for more severe side effects, diphenhydramine is on the “Beers list” to avoid in the elderly. (See NCQA’s HEDIS Measure: Use of High Risk Medications in the Elderly,

Caution: Benadryl Itch Stopping Gel contains additional ingredients including camphor. It is dangerous when swallowed.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/hLwHna

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/fgK7Om

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“Face to face match made by angels”

A perfect match.

Anna Kasper, who took care of nursing home patients, delivered pizza and cleaned offices, had a warm giving personality.

Recipient of first full face transplanta down-to-earth goodness, a love of life, a spirit of giving.

Connie Culp, (Seen on the right.) who waited tables and painted restaurants and shared her time and good will with people before a tragedy nearly took her life. Connie has became the recipient of the first successful near-total face transplant in the United States.

She rose above life’s challenges, and kept her sense of humor no matter how rough things got. This gift has helped her recover.

In a groundbreaking transplant Cleveland Clinic doctors performed a face transplant in 2008.
Anna Kasper’s family made the announcement to give Anna her place in medical history.

Connie’s life after her surgery.
“Connie’s like Anna in a lot of ways,” says Ron Kasper, Anna’s husband, “…enjoyes life, smiles lots and has a great attitude even after everything she’s been through.
Saturday the two families met for the first time.
It was great how much the two clans had in common.

Both are very nice people.
Ron and his son remodel homes and paint for a living.
Connie Culp and her husband had a painting business and remodeled their home together.
The Kaspers had a grandchild who was about a year old at the time of the transplant.
Connie did, too.
The two women were born 14 months apart.
Their skin color is incredibly similar.
Their blood type, identical.

It was Ron and the couple’s three children who agreed to donate Anna’s face back in December 2008, the day after Anna collapsed and died on her back porch.

Their son, Ronald, now 21, found Anna slumped over at the bottom of the back steps she was purple. Paramedics revived her on the way to Lakewood Hospital, but tests showed what the family already knew. The 44-year-old woman was brain dead.

The family folowed Anna’s wishes.
In life she shared her time, money and many things with other people. In death her organs and  tissues continue to give life to others.
However, no one was prepared for the call from a specialist from the Cleveland Clinic, who called the house to ask for Anna’s face.  The family only took minutes to agree.

Anna wished to be cremated, so there wasn’t going to be an open casket. And that Anna was already an organ donor and her face bones, muscles and other tissues were a perfect match. This was a miracle in itself.

“But the overriding factor was we knew it was what Anna would’ve wanted,” says Ron, his voice breaking as he fights back tears.
“My mom would say, ‘Hell if I can’t use it and somebody else can, they can have it,’ ” Becky says.

No doubt Connie needed a face. In 2004 her common-law husband shot her in in the face, Connie was so disfigured, children ran from her and called her a monster.
Her nose was missing. So was her right eye, her lower eyelids, her upper lip, her top teeth. She had to breathe through a hole in her throat and eat through a tube. Most of her vision was gone.

On Dec. 10, 2008, surgeons at the Cleveland Clinic spent 23 hours removing skin and muscle, veins and arteries, teeth and bone from Anna and sewing them onto what remained of Connie Culp’s face, surgery that changed her life.

Connie, 47, has been thanking her donor from the moment she stepped out on the public stage in 2009, never able to name her because she didn’t know who she was.
Today she can.

Neil Lantzy, Cleveland ClinicBecky Kasper hugs Connie Culp after meeting her for the first time Saturday. Becky, her brother, sister and father agreed to donate her mother’s face to Connie after Anna Kasper died of a heart attack.
Connie doesn’t look like Anna because their bone structure is different.
“But I can definitely see the resemblance in the nose,” Becky says. “I know she’s smiling down on this, that she’s very happy.”

More than 50 people benefited from Anna’s donated organs and tissue.

People Helping People

Resources
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“No Cow’s milk for infants and young kids”

Cow’s milk is not recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics for children under 1 year old.

Infants fed whole milk from cows get insufficient amts of

  • vitamin E
  • iron
  • essential fatty acids.

Infants fed whole milk from cows get too much

  • too much protein
  • sodium,
  • potassium.

These levels may be too high for the infant’s system to handle. Also, whole cow’s milk protein and fat are more difficult for an infant to digest and absorb.

For the best infant nutrition, pick the right milk source the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be fed breast milk or iron-fortified formula during the first 12 months of life. Between ages 4 – 6 months, certain solid foods may be added (not fruits).

Breast milk or iron-fortified formula, along with age-appropriate solid foods and avoid  juices during the first year of life, provides more balanced nutrition.

Iron-fortified infant formula or breast milk should be used until a child is 1 year old. No  Dairy Intake for Babies and Toddlers.

Resource


Excerpts
courtesy of  http://bit.ly/bYwLaW

“Ashwagandha helps calm nerves and improve brain funtioning”

Ashwaganda, also known as Indian Ginseng, has been used for centuries for anxiety, cognitive and neurological disorders and inflammation. It is high in antioxidants.Ashwaganda is also used therapeutically for patients with nervous exhaustion, and debility due to stress. It is also used as an immune stimulant as it has been shown to prevent brain cell degeneration from chronic stress.
For centuries, Indian and African medicine have used it an anti-inflammatory, for fever relief, and against infectious disease. Many believe ashwagandha to be effective in stimulating the immune system. It also appears to inhibit swelling and aid memory and can act as a general health tonic.

A study done in 1991 at the Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Health Science Center indicated that extracts of ashwagandha had GABA-like activity. This may account for this herb’s anti-anxiety effects.
Ashwagandha is used in India to treat mental deficits in geriatric patients, including amnesia. Researchers from the University of Leipzig in Germany wanted to find out which neurotransmitters were influenced by ashwagandha. After injecting some of the chemicals in ashwagandha into rats, they later examined slices of their brain and found an increase in acetylcholine receptor activity. The researchers say, The drug-induced increase in acetylcholine receptor capacity might partly explain the cognition-enhancing and memory-improving effects of extracts from Withania somnifera [ashwagandha] observed in animals and humans.

A 2002 laboratory study indicated that ashwagandha stimulates the growth of axons and dendrites. A 2001 animal study showed ashwagandha had memory boosting ability. A 2000 study with rodents showed ashwagandha to have anti-anxiety and anti-depression effects. However, no clinical studies have been carried out to support its efficacy in humans.

Part of the Solanaceae or nightshade family as the tomato, Ashwaganda grows as a stout shrub that reaches a height of 170 cm (5.6 ft). Like the tomato which belongs to the same family, it bears yellow flowers and yellow-Orange to red Berry type fruit, though its fruit is berry-like in size and shape. It grows prolifically in India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.
In Ayurveda, ashwagandha extract is considered an adaptogen or a substance that helps to normalize physiological function of the body and mind. In Ayurveda, the fresh roots are sometimes boiled in milk, prior to drying, in order to leach out undesirable constituents. The berries are used as a substitute for rennet, to coagulate milk in cheese making.
It has sedating properties, but it has been also used for sexual vitality and as an adaptogen. Some herbalists refer to ashwagandha as Indian ginseng, since it is used in ayurvedic medicine in a way similar to that ginseng is used in traditional Chinese medicine.
Seven American and four Japanese firms have filed for grant of patents on formulations containing extracts of the herb Ashwagandha.

Resources

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"To be or not to be stressed out of it-that is the question"

“Fight or flight”, to be stress or not produces in the body a hormonal response (cortisol and other stress hormones), are released within the body, slowing down or halting tissue repair, reproduction, growth and the effectiveness of theimmune system. A decrease in digestive functions of the stomach, intestines and pancreas also occurs.

Anxious feelings initially appear as our entire being prepares to physically either flee or fight . . .but if these anxious feelings are left on, they can worsen and may eventually turn into anxiety and or depressive related conditions. If these stress hormones continue to be released and are not turned off, they most likely will cause adverse physical symptoms, as well, which can lead to chronic physical and emotional distress. Because our stress and social situations have evolved so we cannot “Flee or Fight,” we find ourselves in a state where we “Freeze.” In this state we continue to produce the stress hormones, and often find ourselves not knowing how to respond for fear of losing a job, upsetting a spouse etc., or we may “overreact” with a behavior that does not have much thought to it, often compounding work-related/family or social problems or interactions.

If “fight or flight” response  is left on, these stress hormones released within the body, slow down or stop tissue repair, reproduction, growth and decrease the effectiveness of the immune system. A drop in digestive functions of the stomach, intestines and pancreas will take place.

Stress hormones such as cortisol, GH and norepinephrine are released at periods of high stress. The hormone regulating system is known as the endocrine system. Cortisol is believed to affect the metabolic system and norepinephrine is believed to play a role in ADHD as well as depression and hypertension.

Stress hormones also rise in the body during  surgery, during grief, poor sleep, and even when a person receives exceptionally good and exciting news. The hormones can stay elevated for 72 hours and then return to their normal level.

Prolonged and protracted stress can create anxiety, depression, hyper-vigilance in a variety of ways. The body was never designed to maintain high prolonged periods of stress. It can bring on physical and emotional pain and disease.

There are many integrated/complementary medicine has many ways to address physical and emotional stress successfully. Natural medicine is not used to just address symptoms, but to use the symptoms to create opportunities for the individual to de-stress, address the challenges of their life and heal.

One modality that is used homeopathy. Homeopathy is a system of medicine that listens to the person’s story, carefully assess the effects of the person’s responses to the stresses in their life and chooses a remedy to fit the person.

Each person is unique and responds to a crisis in a different way so there would be  no reason to give the same remedy to each person.

An example: A family has suddenly lost their only son.

  1. Father may refuse to talk about it and be emotionally unsupportive of other family members.
  2. Mother may cry around the clock at the about of their lost son.
  3. Grandmother may put on a strong face in front of everyone, but cry only when she is alone in her room.

All are grieving, but all need different homeopathic medicines to bring them back to a calmer more relaxed  state of effective being. The medicines do not block or suppress grieving, but allow the person to breathe more freely and express themselves so the healing can begin and their mind and body will not stuff feelings away to make them sick later.

Submitted by M.Wolken, PhD Healthy Living Center

Resources

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