Mouthwashes increase health risks

mouthwashTo combat bad breath, mouth rinses take one of two approaches. Some mouthwashes kill the smelly bacteria, while others neutralize or mask the odors produced by sulfur compounds. Antibacterial mouth rinses, as well as those containing chemicals that neutralize odors, do temporarily control bad breath, but products containing chlorhexidine gluconate a substance that kills bacteria, resulted in noticeable but temporary staining of the tongue and teeth. The discoloration can look like tobacco staining, a dark brownish color.(1)

In one study plaque accumulation and gingival condition were recorded using plaque index and gingival index. On the basis of mean baseline plaque and gingival scores, subjects were allocated to four different groups, using their assigned products twice a day, before bed and after breakfast. The results of this clinical study indicate that better therapeutic efficacy can be achieved using gels for treating oral infections than conventional treatments using mouthwash. (2)
Risks from using alcohol based mouthwashes
In two well documented studies researchers have found that the daily use of commercial mouthwashes with a low pH increase the risk of oral, throat cancer and stomach upset, besides greatly increasing teeth sensitivity by eroding tooth enamel and higher levels of bad breath according to recent studies.

In thew first study, at the Division of Restorative Dentistry in Bristol, U.K., researchers found that use of low pH mouthwashes cause erosion of dental enamel and increased sensitivity in teeth to hot or cold changes. (3)

In another study researchers from the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil evaluated control studies from 1998 to 2002 of 309 patients with oral cancer of the mouth and pharynx and 468 controls matched by sex and age. Results show that daily mouthwash use was strongly associated with cancer of the pharynx and also associated with cancer of the mouth.

Detailed information on smoking, alcohol consumption, schooling, and oral health and hygiene were obtained through interviews.

Oral cancer is linked to bleeding gums and failure to have dental But not to he use of full dental prosthesis.
Mouthwash works for a short period of time by killing lots of germs, but because of the high alcohol content the mouth dries. A dry mouth means the salivary glands are dry so the amount of saliva produced is low and thus they are unable to wash away bacteria. This results in even high production of bacteria and even bad breath. This overproduction of bacteria stress the mucous lining of your mouth, throat and stomach and can decrease your immune system your immune system and require your liver to work even harder to detoxify the body and produce the vitamins and minerals your body needs to stay healthy.(3)

Recommendations:
The team strongly suggests that low pH mouthwashes should not be considered for long term or continuous use and should never be used prior to brushing.

Mouthwash works for a short period of time by killing lots of germs, but because of the high alcohol content the mouth dries. A dry mouth means the salivary glands are dry so the amount of saliva produced is low and thus they are unable to wash away bacteria. This results in even high production of bacteria and even bad breath. This overproduction of bacteria stress the mucous lining of your mouth, throat and stomach and can decrease your immune system your immune system and require your liver to work even harder to detoxify the body and produce the vitamins and minerals your body needs to stay healthy.

Conclusions

There are no substitutes for good oral hygiene and quality dental care. Your immune, dental. digestive and immune system depends on it.

Resources

1. Excerpts courtesy of Live Science.com Do mouthwashes work? mouthwash-science

2.Excerpts courtesy of FDI World Dental Press atypon-link.com/FDI/indj.2004.54.4.219

3. Excerpts courtesy of Naturalnews.com naturalnews.com/024591.

Image courtesy of Scienceproject.com scienceproject.com/projects/intermediate/images

Odor to make humans disappear- mosquitoes confusants

19-1The image at the right is an
electron micrograph of the head of a female Anopheles gambiae mosquito, showing the parts of olfactory appendages (antennae, maxillary palps and proboscis)

Dr. Leslie Vosshall and two colleagues at Rockefeller University published a series of experiments that seemed to settle the 50-year-old question of how the insect repellent DEET kept mosquitoes at bay (Science, 319:1838-42, 2008).

Vosshal explained their findings “It doesn’t smell bad to insects. It masks or inhibits their ability to smell you.”
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funded the research to understand how and why DEET works. This is critical to creating the next generation of chemicals, which may head off insect-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever.
Related Articles
Laurence Zwiebel of Vanderbilt University (also a Gates’ grantee) and  Ulrich Bernier of the US Department of Agriculture are not sure the findings just didn’t make sense, given everything they knew about this system

In Vosshall experiment,  the response of the mosquito’s olfactory neurons to two separate, attractive odors in human breath. Then, she combined each odorant with DEET in a single odor cartridge and noticed a smaller neural response. Vosshall believes DEET was blocking the mosquito’s olfactory co-receptor.
Another teams experiment another interpretation

Using gas chromatography, Leal confirmed his suspicions this year. When he repeated Vosshall’s experiment using separate odor cartridges that blended DEET and each attractive odor only at their tips, the mosquito’s neural response was no longer diminished. Then, Leal identified a DEET-sensitive odor receptor neuron and showed that mosquitoes avoid passing through a “curtain” of DEET vapors.
Leal’s paper surprised Vosshall, but is unconvinced by Leal’s results, and has been trying to reproduce the effect in her own lab. “Competition in science is good,” she says, “It can be difficult when it’s a small field, and this is a very small field.”

Genomic studies in 2005 have since shown that this co-receptor is found in insects ranging from mosquitoes to moths,  making humans invisible to insects. Using tissue cultures, she uses targeted drug discovery to screen 91,520 compounds from a chemical library, short-listing about 150 that she believes have the potential to be insect “confusants.”

Even Vosshall’s skeptics admit the confusant strategy is fundamentally sound. Zwiebel says his unpublished molecular work confirms the existence of confusants, but when it comes to DEET, he and Vosshall aren’t willing to budge. “We have agreed to disagree on the DEET story,” he says.

Resources

Smells funny? – Brendan Borrell  The Scientist.com Volume 23 | Issue 1 | Page 19.

http://www.the-scientist.com/2009/01/1/19/1/

Mosquitoes smell and avoid the insect repellent DEET – Leal and Zainulabeuddin Syed,  PNAS 105:13598-603, 2008 September 2008.


Image courtesy
of LJ Zwiebel, colorization by Dominic Doyle / Vanderbilt University