“Death by worms”

The hookworm, the whipworm and the spiral threadworm cause mortality and death  to one billionpeople across the globe

New parasitic worm discovery could help 1 billion people worldwide.
Scientists have discovered why some people may be protected from harmful parasitic worms naturally while others cannot in what could lead to new therapies for up to one billion people worldwide.
The University of Manchester researchers have, for the first time, identified

Mucin-5AC as a protein that in humans is encoded by the MUC5AC gene to be the key component of the mucus found in the guts of humans and animals is toxic to worms.

Dr Sumaira Hasnain, the lead researcher said “For the first time, we have discovered that a single component of the mucus barrier, the Muc5ac mucin, is essential for worm expulsion.
Learning who is and isn’t susceptible to parasitic worms can lead to new treatments for people with chronic worm infections.

How does Muc5ac mucin effect cells?

  • The abnormal expression of gastric M1/MUC5AC mucin in precancerous lesions and colon cancer.
  • Cigarette smoke when it enters lung tissue induces MUC5AC mucin overproduction via tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme in human airway epithelial (NCI-H292) cells.
  • During inflammation Nitric oxide (NO) is generally increased in airway diseases. This causes NO to increase the secretion of mucin from the goblet cell and submucosal glands.

“These parasitic worms live in the gut, which is protected by a thick layer of mucus,” explained Dr David Thornton, from the University’s Wellcome Trust Center for Cell Matrix Research. “The mucus barrier is not just slime, but a complex mixture of salts, water and large ‘sugar-coated’ proteins called mucins that give mucus its gel-like properties.

By creating more mucous study mice were able to expel this whipworm from the gut. Importantly, the mucus from these mice contained the mucin, Muc5ac. This mucin is rarely present in the gut, but when it is, it alters the physical properties of the mucus gel.
Mice unable to genetically produce Muc5ac were unable to expel the worms, despite having a strong immune response against these parasites. This resulted in long-term infections.

Muc5ac is also essential for the efficient expulsion from the gut like hookworm, and the spiral threadworm. Together, these worms cause mortality and morbidity in up to one billion people across the globe.
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“Dementia linked to overweight”

Being overweight or obese in midlife and beyond increases the risk for dementia even if there is no history of diabetes and vascular disease.

With 1.6 billion adults around the world being overweight, controlling body weight can help prevent dementia in seniors, the researchers say.

Recent research has shown a link “between midlife obesity and dementia, but for overweight, the association has been controversial,” said lead author Weili L. Xu, MD, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher in the Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. “But from this twin study, we demonstrated that both overweight and obesity increases the risk of dementia in later life.”

The study was published in the May 3 issue of Neurology.

The research study used data from the nationwide Swedish Twin Registry between the years 1998 and 2001. The twins in this registry were age 65 years and older. 13,723 twins completed cognitive screening tests and 8534 were included in this study.

The protocol included a neuropsychological assessment, including the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Researchers calculated body mass index (BMI) at midlife (mean age, 43.4 years) using self-reported weight in kilograms divided by self-reported height in meters squared and categorized BMI into 4 groups: underweight (BMI < 20), normal weight (20-25), overweight (26-30), and obese (>30).

Dementia was diagnosed in 350 of the 8534 participants (4.1%), including 232 with Alzheimer’s disease and 74 with vascular dementia; 114 (1.3%) had what was considered questionable dementia.

Compared with those without dementia, twins with confirmed or questionable dementia were older; had lower levels of education and current BMI; and were more likely to have diabetes, stroke, and heart disease.

The study showed a strong link between dementia and midlife BMI. In the model adjusted for age, sex, education, diabetes, hypertension, stroke, and heart disease, both overweight and obesity at midlife were associated with increased dementia risk compared with normal BMI.

In this study, 29.8% (2541) of the twins were overweight or obese at midlife, a percentage much lower than the over 50% who are currently considered overweight or obese in the United States and Europe. This, said Dr. Xu, is because the data are from 30 years ago, before the global obesity epidemic.

Dementia-Discordant Twins

In a matched case-control analysis of 137 dementia-discordant twin pairs a high BMI equaled a higher rate of dementia.

Because twins share the same genes and early life environment, these 2 factors might help explain the link between body weight and dementia, said Dr. Xu.

In the case of only 1 twin developing dementia, that sibling might have been exposed to a trigger in early life that turned on a gene that increased the risk for obesity or dementia, she added. Dr. Xu and her colleagues have shown that the FTO gene, for example, is associated with both obesity and Alzheimer’s disease.

In addition to the contribution of genes, the link between body fat and dementia could involve a vascular pathway, said Dr. Xu. “High body fat is associated with diabetes and vascular disease, which in turn are related to dementia risk.” However, this study controlled for lifespan vascular disease, suggesting that the pathway may be nonvascular.

If that’s the case, the pathway may involve metabolism. High adiposity is associated with an altered metabolic status, including hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and high blood pressure. This can contribute to the metabolic syndrome, which other studies have linked to cognitive decline, said Dr. Xu.

Or, the association could also involve a hormonal pathway or inflammation, said Dr. Xu. “Adipose tissue is the largest endocrine organ and it secretes inflammatory cytokines and growth hormones such as interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein, and also leptin, which is associated with obesity.”

Whatever the mechanism, the important message is that overweight and obese people need to lose weight. Dr. Xu emphasized that even though the study looked at midlife body weight, “it’s never too late” to shed excess pounds.

She added that physical activity can reverse the risk for dementia due to obesity. “This is part of our ongoing study, but preliminary results already show that if you do more physical activity, you can reduce your risk of dementia.”

John Hart, MD, professor of neurology, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, and member of the American Academy of Neurology, emphasized that the study shows correlation between obesity and dementia and does not prove cause and effect.

As for the contribution of environmental factors, Dr. Hart agreed that twins share genes, but they don’t necessarily share the same experiences that might trigger a genetic reaction. For example, one twin may have had a severe infection or a head injury that the other twin didn’t.

This is just one more wake up call to stay fit and eat right.

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“2010 most prescribed and purchased drugs”

The 10 most prescribed drugs in the U.S. aren’t the drugs on which we spend the most, according to a report from the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics.
The institute is the public face of IMS, a pharmaceutical market intelligence firm. Its latest report provides a wealth of data on U.S. prescription drug use.
Continuing a major trend, IMS finds that 78% of the nearly 4 billion U.S. prescriptions written in 2010 were for generic drugs (both unbranded and those still sold under a brand name). In order of number of prescriptions written in 2010, the 10 most-prescribed drugs in the U.S. are:

  • Hydrocodone (combined with acetaminophen) — 131.2 million prescriptions
  • Generic Zocor (simvastatin), a cholesterol-lowering statin drug — 94.1 million prescriptions
  • Lisinopril (brand names include Prinivil and Zestril), a blood pressure drug — 87.4 million prescriptions
  • Generic Synthroid (levothyroxine sodium), synthetic thyroid hormone — 70.5 million prescriptions
  • Generic Norvasc (amlodipine besylate), an angina/blood pressure drug — 57.2 million prescriptions
  • Generic Prilosec (omeprazole), an antacid drug — 53.4 million prescriptions (does not include over-the-counter sales)
  • Azithromycin (brand names include Z-Pak and Zithromax), an antibiotic — 52.6 million prescriptions
  • Amoxicillin (various brand names), an antibiotic — 52.3 million prescriptions
  • Generic Glucophage (metformin), a diabetes drug — 48.3 million prescriptions
  • Hydrochlorothiazide (various brand names), a water pill used to lower blood pressure — 47.8 million prescriptions.
The 10 Best-Selling Drugs
However, these generic drugs are not create the hugh dollars for pharmaceutical companies. The drugs that are still protected by patent create the fortunes companies grow on.
The IMS reports that Americans spent $307 billion on prescription drugs in 2010.
The 10 drugs on which we spent the most were:
  1. Lipitor, a cholesterol-lowering statin drug — $7.2 billion
  2. Nexium, an antacid drug — $6.3 billion
  3. Plavix, a blood thinner — $6.1 billion
  4. Advair Diskus, an asthma inhaler — $4.7 billion
  5. Abilify, an antipsychotic drug — $4.6 billion
  6. Seroquel, an antipsychotic drug — $4.4 billion
  7. Singulair, an oral asthma drug — $4.1 billion
  8. Crestor, a cholesterol-lowering statin drug — $3.8 billion
  9. Actos, a diabetes drug — $3.5 billion
  10. Epogen, an injectable anemia drug — $3.3 billion
Who’s paying for all these drugs?
Commercial insurance helped pay for 63% of prescriptions, down from 66% five years ago. Federal government spending through Medicare Part D covered 22% of prescriptions.
For Americans covered by insurance, Medicare, or Medicaid, the average co-payment for a prescription was $10.73 — down a bit from 2009 due to increased use of generic drugs. The average co-payment for branded drugs for which generic alternatives were available jumped 6% to $22.73.
In 2010
Doctor visits were down 4.2% since 2009.
Patients filled more than half of their prescriptions — 54% — at chain drugstores, possibly because of discounts on generic drugs.
Brands that lost their protection from generic competition led to $12.6 billion less spending in 2010 than in 2009.
The price increase for drugs without generic competition led to $16.6 billion more spending in 2010 than in 2009.
Drug companies offered $4.5 billion in rebates to assist patients with the high cost of brand name drugs for which there was no generic alternative.
SOURCE:
A courtesy of WebMD  Health News   http://bit.ly/ljqG1n 

 


“Ear traps and continues sound”

Maybe we actually can still hear that person hollering at us or that beautiful melody long after the sound of the voice or instruments are gone.

The some vibrations in the inner ear continue even after a sound has ended researchers have found. In the inner ear seems to serve as the mechanical memory of recent sounds. In addition to contributing to sound perception, auditory memory and understanding.

The inner ear contains a structure called the coiled cochlea, fluid filled structure that contains a “basilar” membrane and associated “hair cells” that serves as the organ of hearing.Sound entering the inner ear causes vibrations of the basilar (bottom ) membrane causing the hair cells to bend and vibrate which in turn convey auditory information to the nervous system.

Some hair cells respond to basilar membrane vibrations by producing forces that increase hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity through mechanisms that are not completely understood.
Dr. Alfred L. Nuttall from the Oregon Hearing Research Centersays his research shows that there is evidence that some tones produce vibrations that continue even after the end of the stimulus.

Using anesthetized guinea pigs, Dr. Nuttall and colleagues recorded basilar membrane motion and hair cell related potentials in response to various sounds. They observed that after-vibrations were dependent on the magnitude and frequency of the sound stimuli and that even minor hearing loss elicited a profound reduction in after-vibrations.

“The after-vibrations ( like an after shock from an earthquake-editor’s note) appear to be driven by sustained force production in the inner ear – a form of short-term memory of past stimulations,” says Dr. Nuttall.

“The ability to detect brief gaps in an ongoing stimulus is critical for speech recognition; gaps need to be longer than a minimal interval to be perceived,” explains Dr. Nutall. “To the extent that after-vibrations excite the auditory nerve fibers, they may explain part of the difficulty in detecting such gaps.” The study is published by Cell Press in Biophysical Journal.
Article courtesy of  http://bit.ly/fUcvnk

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“DNR orders vs surgery survival?”

Dr. Saziana Roman,, a surgeon at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and his team analyzed patient databases from more than 120 hospitals across the U.S for how patients fared after surgery. To their surprise they found that about 4,000 patients that had signed the do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders did worse after surgery than those that had not signed the agreement.
Results:
1/4 of the DNR patients died in the month following their surgery.
3 times as many as in the comparison group.

  • DNR patients are usually sicker
  • DNR patients also had slightly more complications, such as pneumonia or stroke.

The outcomes depended on the type of surgery.
1/2 of the DNR patients having an exploratory laparotomy(abdominal surgery) died within one month of the surgery, –  one in five of the patients without the order.

“We can now say ‘look, you have a really high chance of dying, do you even want to go through this?'” Roman told Reuters Health, adding that the patient might prefer pain medication such as morphine to surgery.
For thighbone fracture repair or appendectomies, on the other hand, there was no difference between the two patient groups.

Excerpts courtesy of  http://reut.rs/edL3qb

Sample of DNR form

The Prehospital Medical Care Directive form (commonly known as the Do Not Resuscitate or DNR form) is authorized by A.R.S. § 36-3251. The DNR form allows an individual to indicate that he or she does not want to be resuscitated if he or she suffers cardiac or respiratory arrest. The form allows an individual to declare that the following resuscitative measures are not to be used: cardiac compression, endotracheal intubation and other advanced airway management, artificial ventilation, defibrillation, administration of advanced cardiac life support drugs and related emergency medical procedures. The DNR form does not authorize the withholding of other medical interventions, such as intravenous fluids, oxygen, or other therapies deemed necessary to provide comfort care or to alleviate pain.

Emergency medical system and hospital emergency department personnel who make a good faith effort to identify the patient and who rely on an apparently genuine DNR form or photocopy of a DNR form on orange paper are immune from liability to the same extent and under the same conditions as prescribed in A.R.S. § 36-3205. If a person has any doubt as to the validity of a DNR form or the medical situation, that person shall proceed with resuscitative efforts as otherwise required by law. Emergency medical system personnel are not required to accept or interpret medical care directives that do not meet the requirements of A.R.S. § 36-3251.

Specifications regarding the DNR form:

  • The DNR form must be printed on an orange background and may be in either letter or wallet size.
  • The DNR form must include the wording mandated by A.R.S. § 36-3251.
  • A person who has a valid DNR form may wear an identifying bracelet on either the wrist or ankle. The bracelet must:
    • Be substantially similar to identification bracelets worn in hospitals;
    • Be on an orange background; and
    • State in bold type:
      • Do Not Resuscitate,
      • Patient’s name, and
      • Patient’s physician.

Free copies of the DNR form may be requested by calling the Bureau of Emergency Medical Services at (602) 364-3150 or via email. To print a free copy of the form, click below. The links below are available in PDF or Word format. In order to download the PDF version, Acrobat Reader™ is required. Please remember that the law requires that the form be on orange paper.
• Letter-size version of the DNR form [PDF 52K] [DOC 22K]
• Wallet-size version of the DNR form [PDF 56K] [DOC 22K]

Resource courtesy of  http://1.usa.gov/gyXg2q

“O2 to the rescue”

Healing should be a simple noninvasive and natural process.

High Dose Of Oxygen Enhances Natural Cancer Treatment


A Petri dish with human cancer cells was placed in this high-pressure oxygen chamber for 48 hours. Source: Reimers Systems

An environment of pure oxygen at three-and-a-half times normal air pressure adds significantly to the effectiveness of a natural compound already shown to kill cancerous cells, researchers at the University of Washington and Washington State University recently reported in the journal Anticancer Research.

The compound artemisinin – isolated from Artemisia annua L, commonly known as wormwood – is a natural remedy widely used to treat malaria. In the mid-1990s UW researchers were the first to explore its ability to treat cancer.

In the new study, using artemisinin or high-pressure oxygen alone on a culture of human leukemia cells reduced the cancer cells’ growth by 15 percent. Using them in combination reduced the cells’ growth by 38 percent, a 50 percent increase in artemisinin’s effectiveness.(“Other natural substances like prickly pear concentrate has upwards of 100% kill in vitro – editor’s note)

“If you combine high-pressure oxygen with artemisinin you can get a much better curing effect,” said author Henry Lai, a UW research professor of bioengineering. “We only measured up to 48 hours. Over longer time periods we expect the synergistic effects to be even more dramatic.”

The history of artemisinin brings to mind an Indiana Jones story. In the early 1970s, Lai says, Chinese leader Mao Zedong issued an order to develop an anti-malarial treatment. At the same time, a farmer in central China discovered a 2,000-year-old tomb that contained three coffins.

One coffin contained a silk scroll describing various prescriptions, including artemisinin to treat malaria. The Chinese followed the directions and thus rediscovered an ancient remedy.

Today, artemisinin is widely used in Asia and Africa for malaria treatment.

In the decades since, scientists have discovered artemisinin reacts with iron within a cell to form a free radical, a highly reactive charged particle that destroys the cell. Because the malaria parasite is high in iron, artemisinin targets malaria-infected cells.

Since rapidly dividing cancer cells also need iron to form new DNA, Lai theorized they would also make targets for artemisinin. Subsequent research showed this to be the case.

Lai and colleagues at the UW developed a variant several thousand times more potent than natural artemisinin, which was licensed in 2004 to a Chinese company.

“Artemisinin is a promising low-cost cancer treatment because it’s specific, it’s cheap and you don’t have to inject it,” Lai said. “It’s 100 times more specific than traditional chemotherapy,” he added. “In breast cancer, it’s even better.”

Lai says he’s long hypothesized that high oxygen levels would enhance artemisinin’s effects, because oxygen promotes the formation of free radicals. In 2010, he put the theory to the test in a hyperbaric chamber that co-author Raymond Quock, WSU professor and chair of pharmaceutical sciences, has been using to study highly pressurized oxygen’s ability to relieve pain.

Hyperbaric chambers, filled with oxygen at high pressure, help scuba divers who surface too quickly gradually readjust to normal oxygen levels. A photo of pop singer Jackson in the mid-80s sleeping in a portable hyperbaric chamber sparked rumors that he was trying to heal scars from plastic surgery, retain his youthful appearance or extend his lifespan.

The photo turned out to be a publicity stunt, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved hyperbaric oxygen therapy for several ailments, including decompression sickness, carbon-monoxide poisoning, severe burns and slow-to-heal wounds.

In clinical practice, the artemisinin-hyperbaric study could lead to people or animals spending time in a hyperbaric chamber to enhance the artemisinin’s effectiveness.

Other co-authors are Yusuke Ohgami, Catherine Elstad and Eunhee Chung of WSU and Donald Shirachi of the Chico Hyperbaric Center. The research was funded by the Washington State University College of Pharmacy and the Chico Hyperbaric Center.

In related artemisinin work, funded through a $1.5 million grant from the state’s Life Sciences Discovery Fund to a team led by UW chemistry professor Tomikazu Sasaki:

UW researchers are developing synthetic artemisinin compounds with enhanced potency and anti-cancer selectivity, and WSU researchers are conducting a clinical trial evaluating these compounds’ ability to treat cancer in dogs. The molecular-engineered artemisinin compounds, which are stronger and more targeted than natural artemisinin but can still be taken by mouth, are licensed to Artemisia Biomedical of Newcastle, Wash.

WSU crop scientists are planting Artemisia annua in eastern Washington to test whether the region could plant artemisinin as a commercial crop.

Researchers are working with Northwest Organic Foods, a Washington chicken-feed company, to try adding artemisinin, instead of small amounts of arsenic, to chicken feed. Artemisinin acts as a natural preventative for avian coccidia infection, one of the poultry industry’s most costly parasitic diseases.

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“LOXL2 enzyme spreads cancer”

Did you know?
90 percent of cancer-related deaths occur because a tumor migrates around the patient’s body.
A key to unlock metatasis

The LOXL2 enzyme activity has been linked to the metastasis of a variety of different cancers, including breast, esophageal, colon, and squamous cell cancers.

Researchers analysis of breast cancer patients, found poor survival rates and the spread of some cancers  was linked to high levels of the LOXL2 enzyme. This enzyme  has been linked to the early stages of metastasis of these cancers into the bloodstream.

Around 47,000 new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed in the UK each year and around 12,000 die from the disease.

Recent studies have shown that the lifetime risk of the disease for women is now one in eight.

Experts blamed lifestyle factors, including obesity and drinking alcohol, for fuelling the rise.

Women are also more likely to have children later in life and fewer offspring, which influences the risk.

In the latest study, published in the journal Cancer Research, experts found that LOXL2 promotes the spread of breast cancer through the way it controls two proteins, TIMP1 and MMP9.

In the mice studies, antibodies and chemicals were used to block LOXL2 activity. This prevented breast cancer from metastasizing to other tissues.
These findings are important are an important role in developing a test to try and predict the possible spread of cancer and possible patient outcomes.
Director of Research and Policy at Breast Cancer Campaign, Arlene Wilkie, said, “by using LOXL2 to predict whose cancer will spread and drugs to block the enzyme to stop this from happening, many more lives could be saved.”

This laboratory research shows great promise and we look forward to seeing how it translates into patients.”

Resources

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“TLC +light+caring +chocolate 4 dementia”

Like the old TV show said give me the simple life, Beatitudes in Phoenix, AZ. allows its patients like Ms. Nance, 96, afflicted with Alzheimer’s, “to sleep, be bathed and dine whenever she wants, even at 2 a.m. She could eat anything, too, no matter how unhealthy, including unlimited chocolate.
And she was given a baby doll, a move that seemed so jarring that a supervisor initially objected until she saw how calm Ms. Nance became when she rocked, caressed and fed her “baby,” often agreeing to eat herself after the doll “ate” several spoonfuls.
Dementia patients at Beatitudes are allowed practically anything that brings comfort, even an alcoholic “nip at night,” said Tena Alonzo, director of research. “Whatever your vice is, we’re your folks,” she said.
Once, Ms. Alonzo said: “The state tried to cite us for having chocolate on the nursing chart. They were like, ‘It’s not a medication.’ Yes, it is. It’s better than Xanax.”
It is an unusual posture for a nursing home, but Beatitudes is actually following some of the latest science. Research suggests that creating positive emotional experiences for Alzheimer’s patients diminishes distress and behavior problems.”

In desperation medical people are trying many different non-drug approaches to their care.There is no effective medical treatment for Alzheimer’s yet, most dementia therapy is the care giving performed by families and nursing homes. Some 11 million people care for Alzheimer’s-afflicted relatives at home. In nursing homes, two-thirds of residents have some dementia.
Caregiving support training a priority

Caregiving is considered so crucial that several federal and state agencies, including the Department of Veterans Affairs, are adopting research-tested programs to support and train caregivers. This month, the Senate Special Committee on Aging held a forum about Alzheimer’s care giving.
“There’s actually better evidence and more significant results in caregiver interventions than there is in anything to treat this disease so far,” said Lisa P. Gwyther, education director for the Bryan Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Duke University.
The National Institute on Aging and the Administration on Aging are now financing caregiving studies on “things that just kind of make the life of an Alzheimer’s patient and his or her caregiver less burdensome,” said Sidney M. Stahl, chief of the Individual Behavioral Processes branch of the Institute on Aging.

Techniques include using food, scheduling, art, music and exercise to generate positive emotions; engaging patients in activities that salvage fragments of their skills; and helping caregivers be more accepting and competent.

Caregiving at Beatitudes in Phoenix, AZ. takes on a wholistic individualized tender loving care, hopefully more organizations and institutions will follow this model.

Resources

Excerpts and Image courtesy of   http://nyti.ms/egVcG1

“Medical tourism -the trip hard to enjoy”

With an ever growing number of patients from around the world expected to visit India for healthcare that would be very costly in their home country.  Besides low cost, other factors have been identified in our report that are boosting medical tourism in India. The future of India’s medical tourism industry seems extremely bright.  It is expected that the medical tourism market will grow at by 31% during 2010-2013.
Pharmaceutical outsourcing, health insurance, and medical tourism are anticipated to be the three fastest growing segments in the Indian healthcare market, with all the segments growing at double-digit growth rate during 2010-2013.

Why are people needing to seek more and more care other than in their homeland?

Personal lifestyle stresses causing chronic stress, poor  lifestyle and food choices that are causing a dramatic jump in chronic diseases will create a huge demand in various emerging segments of the industry.

Resources

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"Save your change and use your pen to stop malnutrition"

Starvation kills. Malnutrition and dehydration can eliminated an individuals chance at developing a strong healthy body and mind and can cause death. 200 million children under 5 years of age are affected by malnutrition, with 90 percent living in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. And at any moment, at least 20 million children suffer from thedeadliest form of severe malnutrition. Malnutrition plays a huge role in child mortality because the immune systems of these children are less resistant to common childhood diseases. In fact, malnutrition contributes to at least one third of the eight million annual deaths of children under five of five.

Most of the damage caused by malnutrition occurs in children before they reach their second birthday.

This is the critical window of opportunity when the quality of a child’s diet has a profound, sustained impact on his or her health, physical and mental development. Breast milk is the only food babies need for the first six months. After this time, breastfeeding alone is not sufficient and the types of foods introduced into the diet are of paramount importance. Diets that do not provide the right blend of energy including high-quality protein, essential fats, and carbohydrates as well as vitamins and minerals can impair growth and development, increase the risk of death from common childhood illness, or result in life-long health consequences.

More clean water, protein, fruit and vegetables and less flour will eradicate malnutrition.

Tested strategies to address malnutrition are effective and are showing promising results in Mexico, Thailand, and Brazil, have reduced early childhood malnutrition through direct nutrition programs that ensure infants and young children from even the poorest families have access to quality foods, such as milk and eggs.

Although in Asian and African countries they want to tackle this problem by replicating successful complete food programs, the aid they are sent consists of fortified cereal blend of corn and soy only.  This GMO “food” will fill th ebelly of a starving child, but young child’s hunger, but does not provide proper nourishment.

International donor countries including the USA must end must support programs that don’t supply  the minimal nutritional needs of infants and young children.

Take action today to help Doctors Without Borders to change this food starvation policy,

Give all children a chance to grow up healthy.


Please sign the petition to help change the US policy and give what you can to help.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of http://www.starvedforattention.org

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