“Tai Chi for heart health n office relaxation”

This gentle, graceful movement form packs serious health benefits for all ages that practice Tai chi daily. It has recently been in the news for its help at improving heart heart and for stress reduction.

Many of these exercises can be done sitting at your office desk as well or in a straight back chair at home.

Take 5 minutes  to watch and relax with Tai Chi

“Tai Chi appears to be a safe alternative to low-to-moderate intensity conventional exercise training,” for people with Chronic Heart Failure (CHD)  said Gloria Yeh of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center head of the study team . CHD is a debilitating and progressive disease that limits a person’s ability to breathe and move.

People with chronic heart failure may be able to boost their quality of life by doing Tai Chi, the ancient Chinese exercise regimen that teaches each person control of their body, mind and emotional energy through gentle deliberate quiet motions.

Take 5 minutes  to watch and relax with Tai Chi
Archives of Internal Medicine, a journal of the American Medical Association reported that the study was divided into two group sessions of one hour each per week were enough to show significant improvements in mood and confidence.
50 US heart patients were enrolled in Tai Chi program study led by an instructor who guided the class in a series of fluid motions and 50 others who took classroom study in heart education.

Physical responses were similar in both groups, but those who did tai chi showed “significant” improvements in their emotional state response questionaire. The Tai Chi group also reported better “exercise self-efficacy (confidence to perform certain exercise-related activities), with increased daily activity, and related feelings of well-being compared with the education group,” said the study.
“Tai Chi seems to be a safe alternative to low-to-moderate intensity conventional exercise training, It has a good rate of adherence and may provide value in improving daily exercise, quality of life, self-efficacy and mood in frail, deconditioned patients with systolic heart failure,” said Yeh.

Previous studies have suggested Tai Chi, which involves slow, circular movements and balance-shifting exercises, may be helpful to people who suffer from high blood pressure, fibromyalgia and stress. All ages and ability levels can benefit by daily Tai Chi practice.

Take 5 minutes  to watch and relax with Tai Chi
Resources

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Video courtesy of  http://bit.ly/i1f4Cs

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“2010 most prescribed and purchased drugs”

The 10 most prescribed drugs in the U.S. aren’t the drugs on which we spend the most, according to a report from the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics.
The institute is the public face of IMS, a pharmaceutical market intelligence firm. Its latest report provides a wealth of data on U.S. prescription drug use.
Continuing a major trend, IMS finds that 78% of the nearly 4 billion U.S. prescriptions written in 2010 were for generic drugs (both unbranded and those still sold under a brand name). In order of number of prescriptions written in 2010, the 10 most-prescribed drugs in the U.S. are:

  • Hydrocodone (combined with acetaminophen) — 131.2 million prescriptions
  • Generic Zocor (simvastatin), a cholesterol-lowering statin drug — 94.1 million prescriptions
  • Lisinopril (brand names include Prinivil and Zestril), a blood pressure drug — 87.4 million prescriptions
  • Generic Synthroid (levothyroxine sodium), synthetic thyroid hormone — 70.5 million prescriptions
  • Generic Norvasc (amlodipine besylate), an angina/blood pressure drug — 57.2 million prescriptions
  • Generic Prilosec (omeprazole), an antacid drug — 53.4 million prescriptions (does not include over-the-counter sales)
  • Azithromycin (brand names include Z-Pak and Zithromax), an antibiotic — 52.6 million prescriptions
  • Amoxicillin (various brand names), an antibiotic — 52.3 million prescriptions
  • Generic Glucophage (metformin), a diabetes drug — 48.3 million prescriptions
  • Hydrochlorothiazide (various brand names), a water pill used to lower blood pressure — 47.8 million prescriptions.
The 10 Best-Selling Drugs
However, these generic drugs are not create the hugh dollars for pharmaceutical companies. The drugs that are still protected by patent create the fortunes companies grow on.
The IMS reports that Americans spent $307 billion on prescription drugs in 2010.
The 10 drugs on which we spent the most were:
  1. Lipitor, a cholesterol-lowering statin drug — $7.2 billion
  2. Nexium, an antacid drug — $6.3 billion
  3. Plavix, a blood thinner — $6.1 billion
  4. Advair Diskus, an asthma inhaler — $4.7 billion
  5. Abilify, an antipsychotic drug — $4.6 billion
  6. Seroquel, an antipsychotic drug — $4.4 billion
  7. Singulair, an oral asthma drug — $4.1 billion
  8. Crestor, a cholesterol-lowering statin drug — $3.8 billion
  9. Actos, a diabetes drug — $3.5 billion
  10. Epogen, an injectable anemia drug — $3.3 billion
Who’s paying for all these drugs?
Commercial insurance helped pay for 63% of prescriptions, down from 66% five years ago. Federal government spending through Medicare Part D covered 22% of prescriptions.
For Americans covered by insurance, Medicare, or Medicaid, the average co-payment for a prescription was $10.73 — down a bit from 2009 due to increased use of generic drugs. The average co-payment for branded drugs for which generic alternatives were available jumped 6% to $22.73.
In 2010
Doctor visits were down 4.2% since 2009.
Patients filled more than half of their prescriptions — 54% — at chain drugstores, possibly because of discounts on generic drugs.
Brands that lost their protection from generic competition led to $12.6 billion less spending in 2010 than in 2009.
The price increase for drugs without generic competition led to $16.6 billion more spending in 2010 than in 2009.
Drug companies offered $4.5 billion in rebates to assist patients with the high cost of brand name drugs for which there was no generic alternative.
SOURCE:
A courtesy of WebMD  Health News   http://bit.ly/ljqG1n 

 


“Ear traps and continues sound”

Maybe we actually can still hear that person hollering at us or that beautiful melody long after the sound of the voice or instruments are gone.

The some vibrations in the inner ear continue even after a sound has ended researchers have found. In the inner ear seems to serve as the mechanical memory of recent sounds. In addition to contributing to sound perception, auditory memory and understanding.

The inner ear contains a structure called the coiled cochlea, fluid filled structure that contains a “basilar” membrane and associated “hair cells” that serves as the organ of hearing.Sound entering the inner ear causes vibrations of the basilar (bottom ) membrane causing the hair cells to bend and vibrate which in turn convey auditory information to the nervous system.

Some hair cells respond to basilar membrane vibrations by producing forces that increase hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity through mechanisms that are not completely understood.
Dr. Alfred L. Nuttall from the Oregon Hearing Research Centersays his research shows that there is evidence that some tones produce vibrations that continue even after the end of the stimulus.

Using anesthetized guinea pigs, Dr. Nuttall and colleagues recorded basilar membrane motion and hair cell related potentials in response to various sounds. They observed that after-vibrations were dependent on the magnitude and frequency of the sound stimuli and that even minor hearing loss elicited a profound reduction in after-vibrations.

“The after-vibrations ( like an after shock from an earthquake-editor’s note) appear to be driven by sustained force production in the inner ear – a form of short-term memory of past stimulations,” says Dr. Nuttall.

“The ability to detect brief gaps in an ongoing stimulus is critical for speech recognition; gaps need to be longer than a minimal interval to be perceived,” explains Dr. Nutall. “To the extent that after-vibrations excite the auditory nerve fibers, they may explain part of the difficulty in detecting such gaps.” The study is published by Cell Press in Biophysical Journal.
Article courtesy of  http://bit.ly/fUcvnk

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“DNR orders vs surgery survival?”

Dr. Saziana Roman,, a surgeon at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and his team analyzed patient databases from more than 120 hospitals across the U.S for how patients fared after surgery. To their surprise they found that about 4,000 patients that had signed the do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders did worse after surgery than those that had not signed the agreement.
Results:
1/4 of the DNR patients died in the month following their surgery.
3 times as many as in the comparison group.

  • DNR patients are usually sicker
  • DNR patients also had slightly more complications, such as pneumonia or stroke.

The outcomes depended on the type of surgery.
1/2 of the DNR patients having an exploratory laparotomy(abdominal surgery) died within one month of the surgery, –  one in five of the patients without the order.

“We can now say ‘look, you have a really high chance of dying, do you even want to go through this?'” Roman told Reuters Health, adding that the patient might prefer pain medication such as morphine to surgery.
For thighbone fracture repair or appendectomies, on the other hand, there was no difference between the two patient groups.

Excerpts courtesy of  http://reut.rs/edL3qb

Sample of DNR form

The Prehospital Medical Care Directive form (commonly known as the Do Not Resuscitate or DNR form) is authorized by A.R.S. § 36-3251. The DNR form allows an individual to indicate that he or she does not want to be resuscitated if he or she suffers cardiac or respiratory arrest. The form allows an individual to declare that the following resuscitative measures are not to be used: cardiac compression, endotracheal intubation and other advanced airway management, artificial ventilation, defibrillation, administration of advanced cardiac life support drugs and related emergency medical procedures. The DNR form does not authorize the withholding of other medical interventions, such as intravenous fluids, oxygen, or other therapies deemed necessary to provide comfort care or to alleviate pain.

Emergency medical system and hospital emergency department personnel who make a good faith effort to identify the patient and who rely on an apparently genuine DNR form or photocopy of a DNR form on orange paper are immune from liability to the same extent and under the same conditions as prescribed in A.R.S. § 36-3205. If a person has any doubt as to the validity of a DNR form or the medical situation, that person shall proceed with resuscitative efforts as otherwise required by law. Emergency medical system personnel are not required to accept or interpret medical care directives that do not meet the requirements of A.R.S. § 36-3251.

Specifications regarding the DNR form:

  • The DNR form must be printed on an orange background and may be in either letter or wallet size.
  • The DNR form must include the wording mandated by A.R.S. § 36-3251.
  • A person who has a valid DNR form may wear an identifying bracelet on either the wrist or ankle. The bracelet must:
    • Be substantially similar to identification bracelets worn in hospitals;
    • Be on an orange background; and
    • State in bold type:
      • Do Not Resuscitate,
      • Patient’s name, and
      • Patient’s physician.

Free copies of the DNR form may be requested by calling the Bureau of Emergency Medical Services at (602) 364-3150 or via email. To print a free copy of the form, click below. The links below are available in PDF or Word format. In order to download the PDF version, Acrobat Reader™ is required. Please remember that the law requires that the form be on orange paper.
• Letter-size version of the DNR form [PDF 52K] [DOC 22K]
• Wallet-size version of the DNR form [PDF 56K] [DOC 22K]

Resource courtesy of  http://1.usa.gov/gyXg2q

“No satisfaction-I want it now!”

Instant gratification (“junkification”) – I want it now!!
We have been programmed or brainwashed  in our society to need to have what we want no matter the price we pay physically or emotionally this instant. Oral gratification is driven by our may unspoken needs for pleasure, love, avoidance and boredom.
As a whole, our capitalist system is designed to get us to take actions and spend money now – and those businesses that are more successful in that do better and prosper (at least in the short term).

Filling those impulses tests our ability to resist temptation and exercise self-control. What’s the benefit of that?
Can the exercise of self control be an important force in our lives?
Several decades ago, Walter Mischel started investigating the determinants of delayed gratification in children. He found that the degree of self-control independently exerted by preschoolers who were tempted with small rewards (but told they could receive larger rewards if they resisted) is predictive of grades and social competence in adolescence.
Delayed gratification is a predictor of success in school and life

Researchers at Duke University have shown that the role of self control creates a better mental and social outcomes in adolescence and into adulthood.
A 1,000 children were followed for 30 years, examining the effect of early self-control on health, wealth and public safety. Controlling for socioeconomic status and IQ, they show that individuals with lower self-control experienced negative outcomes in all three areas, with greater rates of health issues like sexually transmitted infections, substance dependence, financial problems including poor credit and lack of savings, single-parent child-rearing, and even crime. These results show that self-control can have a deep influence on a wide range of activities.  And there is some good news: if we can find a way to improve self-control, maybe we could do better.
Where does the skill of self –control come from?
So when we consider these individual differences in the ability to exert self-control, the real question is where they originate – are they differences in pure, unadulterated ability (i.e., one is simply born with greater self-control) or are these differences a result of sophistication (a greater ability to learn and create strategies that help overcome temptation)?
In other words, are the kids who are better at self control able to control, and actively reduce, how tempted they are by the immediate rewards in their environment, or are they just better at coming up with ways to distract themselves and this way avoid acting on their temptation?
It may very well be the latter.

Ability to resist temptation is environmental, culturally, innately  and cultivated. Some children sat on their hands, physically restraining themselves, while others tried to redirect their attention by singing, talking or looking away.
Mischel found that all children were better at delaying rewards when distracting thoughts were suggested to them.

You can see a modern recreation of the original Mischel experiment by clicking on the video link below.(This experiment should be named Marshmellow Torture-editor’s note)  Who are you most like in the video?
Remember there are many natural medicine strategies to help build self control and overcome addictive compulsive tendencies. Email us if you would like more information.

Editor Mary Wolken, PhD
Resources

Video courtesy of  http://bit.ly/idElXK
Excerpts courtesy of http://bit.ly/e5UQGc

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“Hope filter radioactive H2O”

As our collective conscious grows and we work together may positive changes are taking place-there is no need to fear.

A natural way to remove radioactive contaminants from water.

The new material is a combination of hemicellulose, a byproduct of forest materials, and chitosan, crushed and powdered crustacean shells that will absorbs water and actually extract contaminates, such as radioactive iodide, from the water itself says researchers from North Carolina State University have found.
“As we’re currently seeing in Japan, one of the major health risks posed by nuclear accidents is radioactive iodide that dissolves into drinking water. Because it is chemically identical to non-radioactive iodide, the human body cannot distinguish it – which is what allows it to accumulate in the thyroid and eventually lead to cancer,” says Dr. Joel Pawlak, associate professor of forest biomaterials.
“The material that we’ve developed binds iodide in water and traps it, which can then be properly disposed of without risk to humans or the environment.”
The new material – a combination of hemicellulose, a byproduct of forest materials, and chitosan, crustacean shells that have been crushed into a powder – not only absorbs water, but can actually extract contaminates, such as radioactive iodide, from the water itself.
This material, which forms a solid foam, has applications beyond radioactive materials. Pawlak and fellow researchers found that it has the ability to remove heavy metals – such as arsenic – from water or salt from sea water to make clean drinking water.
“In disaster situations with limited-to-no power source, desalinating drinking water is difficult, if not impossible. This foam could be brought along in such situations to clean the water without the need for electricity,” Pawlak says.
“This material could completely change the way we safeguard the world’s drinking water supply.”
The foam, which is coated on wood fibers, is used like a sponge that is immersed in water. For smaller-scale applications, the foam could be used in something like a tea bag.

On a larger scale, water could be poured through it like a filter.
Pawlak worked with NC State professor Dr. Richard Venditti on the research, which was funded by the Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, the N.C. Forestry Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy.

Additional research into how the material can be used on a larger scale is currently being conducted.

Excerpts courtesy of http://bit.ly/gw8p59

“Acetaminophen (Tylanol) blood pressure link”

For people with cardiovascular disease who need relief from aches and pains, acetaminophen (Tylenol and its generic cousins) has long been touted as a “safer” alternative to aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen.
Acetaminophen isn’t free from cardiovascular side effects. It is worth a try as a first-line drug for pain relief,
but it can have negative effect on your blood pressure.

A small but important Swiss trial warns that it may not be. This work doesn’t mean you should ditch acetaminophen if it helps you, but does suggest you should give it the caution that it — and every medication — deserves.
A closer look at acetaminophen
The Swiss team set out to fill a surprising gap in medical knowledge: the effect of acetaminophen on blood pressure among people with coronary artery disease. This includes folks with angina (chest pain with exercise or stress) along with anyone who has had bypass surgery or angioplasty or who has been diagnosed with cholesterol-clogged arteries.
The researchers asked 33 men and women with one or more of these problems to take either 1,000 milligrams (mg) of acetaminophen or an identical placebo three times a day for two weeks. Then, after a two-week break, each volunteer took the other treatment. The amount of acetaminophen used in the study is a standard daily dose for pain.
When the participants took acetaminophen, average systolic blood pressure (the top number of a blood pressure reading) increased from 122.4 to 125.3, while the average diastolic pressure (the bottom number) increased from 73.2 to 75.4. Blood pressure stayed steady when participants took the placebo. These increases aren’t large. But they indicate that acetaminophen, like NSAIDs, somehow affects the cardiovascular system.
A larger, longer trial would have given more reliable results. It would also have been unethical, since none of the participants were in pain. That means they couldn’t reap any benefit from acetaminophen, but could only be harmed by it.
Making choices
The sudden removal of the popular painkiller Vioxx from the market in October 2004 over concerns that it caused cardiovascular problems put all pain relievers under the spotlight — except acetaminophen. It avoided the “black box” warning about increased risk of cardiac problems that the FDA now requires on the labels of all NSAIDs. And the American Heart Association later recommended it as a safe alternative to NSAIDs.
Acetaminophen is easier on the stomach than aspirin and other NSAIDs, and is probably a good option for people who take warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven, generic) or clopidogrel (Plavix). But because it is so widely used and perceived as safe, people tend to take it without thinking, one reason acetaminophen is a leading cause of liver failure and transplantation in the United States.
If you have some form of cardiovascular disease, it makes sense to take acetaminophen rather than an NSAID for a fever, headache, pulled muscle, or other occasional problem. But if you need relief every day for pain from osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, acetaminophen may not be a better option than an NSAID — it doesn’t work that well against inflammatory pain and, like an NSAID, may slightly elevate blood pressure.
The key message from this study is that acetaminophen isn’t free from cardiovascular side effects. It is worth a try as a first-line drug for pain relief, but if it doesn’t control your pain, it is reasonable to switch to an NSAID.

Article provided courtesy of  http://hvrd.me/fbVSUy

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“O2 to the rescue”

Healing should be a simple noninvasive and natural process.

High Dose Of Oxygen Enhances Natural Cancer Treatment


A Petri dish with human cancer cells was placed in this high-pressure oxygen chamber for 48 hours. Source: Reimers Systems

An environment of pure oxygen at three-and-a-half times normal air pressure adds significantly to the effectiveness of a natural compound already shown to kill cancerous cells, researchers at the University of Washington and Washington State University recently reported in the journal Anticancer Research.

The compound artemisinin – isolated from Artemisia annua L, commonly known as wormwood – is a natural remedy widely used to treat malaria. In the mid-1990s UW researchers were the first to explore its ability to treat cancer.

In the new study, using artemisinin or high-pressure oxygen alone on a culture of human leukemia cells reduced the cancer cells’ growth by 15 percent. Using them in combination reduced the cells’ growth by 38 percent, a 50 percent increase in artemisinin’s effectiveness.(“Other natural substances like prickly pear concentrate has upwards of 100% kill in vitro – editor’s note)

“If you combine high-pressure oxygen with artemisinin you can get a much better curing effect,” said author Henry Lai, a UW research professor of bioengineering. “We only measured up to 48 hours. Over longer time periods we expect the synergistic effects to be even more dramatic.”

The history of artemisinin brings to mind an Indiana Jones story. In the early 1970s, Lai says, Chinese leader Mao Zedong issued an order to develop an anti-malarial treatment. At the same time, a farmer in central China discovered a 2,000-year-old tomb that contained three coffins.

One coffin contained a silk scroll describing various prescriptions, including artemisinin to treat malaria. The Chinese followed the directions and thus rediscovered an ancient remedy.

Today, artemisinin is widely used in Asia and Africa for malaria treatment.

In the decades since, scientists have discovered artemisinin reacts with iron within a cell to form a free radical, a highly reactive charged particle that destroys the cell. Because the malaria parasite is high in iron, artemisinin targets malaria-infected cells.

Since rapidly dividing cancer cells also need iron to form new DNA, Lai theorized they would also make targets for artemisinin. Subsequent research showed this to be the case.

Lai and colleagues at the UW developed a variant several thousand times more potent than natural artemisinin, which was licensed in 2004 to a Chinese company.

“Artemisinin is a promising low-cost cancer treatment because it’s specific, it’s cheap and you don’t have to inject it,” Lai said. “It’s 100 times more specific than traditional chemotherapy,” he added. “In breast cancer, it’s even better.”

Lai says he’s long hypothesized that high oxygen levels would enhance artemisinin’s effects, because oxygen promotes the formation of free radicals. In 2010, he put the theory to the test in a hyperbaric chamber that co-author Raymond Quock, WSU professor and chair of pharmaceutical sciences, has been using to study highly pressurized oxygen’s ability to relieve pain.

Hyperbaric chambers, filled with oxygen at high pressure, help scuba divers who surface too quickly gradually readjust to normal oxygen levels. A photo of pop singer Jackson in the mid-80s sleeping in a portable hyperbaric chamber sparked rumors that he was trying to heal scars from plastic surgery, retain his youthful appearance or extend his lifespan.

The photo turned out to be a publicity stunt, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved hyperbaric oxygen therapy for several ailments, including decompression sickness, carbon-monoxide poisoning, severe burns and slow-to-heal wounds.

In clinical practice, the artemisinin-hyperbaric study could lead to people or animals spending time in a hyperbaric chamber to enhance the artemisinin’s effectiveness.

Other co-authors are Yusuke Ohgami, Catherine Elstad and Eunhee Chung of WSU and Donald Shirachi of the Chico Hyperbaric Center. The research was funded by the Washington State University College of Pharmacy and the Chico Hyperbaric Center.

In related artemisinin work, funded through a $1.5 million grant from the state’s Life Sciences Discovery Fund to a team led by UW chemistry professor Tomikazu Sasaki:

UW researchers are developing synthetic artemisinin compounds with enhanced potency and anti-cancer selectivity, and WSU researchers are conducting a clinical trial evaluating these compounds’ ability to treat cancer in dogs. The molecular-engineered artemisinin compounds, which are stronger and more targeted than natural artemisinin but can still be taken by mouth, are licensed to Artemisia Biomedical of Newcastle, Wash.

WSU crop scientists are planting Artemisia annua in eastern Washington to test whether the region could plant artemisinin as a commercial crop.

Researchers are working with Northwest Organic Foods, a Washington chicken-feed company, to try adding artemisinin, instead of small amounts of arsenic, to chicken feed. Artemisinin acts as a natural preventative for avian coccidia infection, one of the poultry industry’s most costly parasitic diseases.

Resources

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“Relax and feel the blessings from North Pole”

Take a deep breath and focus on the image for a few minutes.

Just relax and give thanks for our many beautiful blessings.

 

Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2011 08:49:05 -0600

 

Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2011 08:49:05 -0600 

 

This is the sunset at the North Pole with the moon at its closest point last week.
a scene you will probably never get to see in person,
so take a moment and enjoy God at work at the North Pole.
And, you also see the sun below the moon, an amazing photo and not one easily duplicated.

You may want to pass it on to others so they can enjoy it.
The Chinese have a saying that goes something like this:
‘When someone shares with you something of value,

you have an obligation to share it with others!’
I just did.. Your turn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author unknown “Sunset over the North Pole”