“Giffords is talking and eating 3x a day”

Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords spoke for the first time since she was shot in the forehead, her

recovering

spokesman said Wednesday, yet another significant milestone in her recovery from a traumatic brain injury.  A true testament to her dogged determination to get well and all of the positive energy being sent her from thousands of well wishers and her loving family.

Giffords first spoke within the past few days and is speaking “more and more,” spokesman C.J. Karamargin said Wednesday. He didn’t know what her first words were, but said at breakfast one morning she asked for toast.

“She’s working very hard and it’s paying off,” he told The Associated Press. “We’re elated at this. We always knew Gabby is a fighter and that she’s not going to let this thing win. And you know, every day is proof of that.”

Six people, including a 9-year-old girl and a federal judge, were killed in the attack outside a grocery store where Giffords was meeting with constituents. Thirteen people, including Giffords, were injured.

Other news organizations, including Politico, earlier reported that Giffords had asked for toast and was able to speak.

In a Facebook post on Tuesday, Giffords’ husband Mark Kelly said his wife had her appetite back and was eating three times a day, “even though it’s hospital food.”

“It is hard to believe that only one month has passed since Gabrielle was shot,” he wrote. “The doctors say she is recovering at lightning speed considering her injury but they aren’t kidding when they say this is a marathon process.”

He said “there are encouraging signs every day,” pointing to her renewed appetite.

“Your prayers are being heard, so don’t stop,” he wrote.

Kelly, a NASA astronaut, said last week that he expects his wife to be well enough to be at his space launch in two months.

The space shuttle Endeavour will leave April 19 for a two-week mission to the International Space Station, and Kelly will be on board leading a veteran, all-male crew. The mission will be Endeavour’s final flight and Kelly’s fourth.

Dr. Gerard Francisco, who is treating Giffords at a rehabilitation facility in Houston, said Tuesday that he hopes the congresswoman can make enough progress to attend the space launch, but said it’s too early to say.

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“Beware of kids loving tooth paste !”

Beware of young children loving tooth paste too much. Seems if a young child eats or drinks and then swallows too much fluoride, the fluoride, it can damage the natural coloration of their teeth permanently. Their teeth can be damaged mildly as in the image below or severely as in the bottom.

Dental fluorosis is a health condition caused by a child receiving too much fluoride during tooth development and nutrition. The critical period of exposure is between 1 and 4 years old; children over age 8 are not at risk. In its mild form, which is the most common, fluorosis appears as tiny white streaks or specks that are often unnoticeable. In its severest form, which is also called mottling of dental enamel, it is characterized by black and brown stains, as well as cracking and pitting of the teeth.
How does fluoride stain or pit the teeth?

Dental fluorosis occurs by ingesting too much fluoride, either from the fluoride in the water supply, naturally occurring or added to it; or from fluoride toothpaste or other sources. It damages teeth while they are developing in children between the ages of 3 months to 8 years, from the overexposure to fluoride.
How are teeth damaged by fluorosis?

Teeth are generally composed of minerals/calcium compounds, calcium phosphate hydroxyapatite and carbonated hydroxyapatite; when fluoride is present, some fluorapatite is formed. When excessive fluoride is present, white spots, brown stains or pitting or mottling of enamel will occur. Once the tooth has come through gums into the oral cavity, fluorapatite is beneficial; it is more resistant to dissolution by acids (demineralization). Although it is usually the permanent (adult) teeth which are affected, occasionally the primary (baby) teeth may be involved.

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The organic portion of enamel does not contain collagen, as dentin and bone does. Instead, it has two unique classes of proteins called amelogenins and enamelins . The role of these proteins is uncertain but thought to be needed for the development of enamel as a framework support and other mechanisms.

Talk to your pediatric dentist or water treatment facility to tell you how much fluoride is in your local drinking water. If you drink well water or bottled water, your pediatric dentist can assist you in getting an analysis of its fluoride content. After you know how much fluoride your child receives, you and your pediatric dentist can decide together whether your child needs a fluoride supplement.

Caution:

  • Monitor your child when it is tooth brushing time:
  • If you are using a fluoridated toothpaste use a pea-sized amount on the brush is plenty for fluoride protection.
  • Teach your child to spit out the toothpaste, not swallow it, after brushing.

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Excerpts courtesy of http://bit.ly/es55G2

Excerpts
courtesy of  http://bit.ly/h3uGNi

Diagram tooth courtesy of  http://bit.ly/gGWmro

Image 1. courtesy of   http://bit.ly/fWqBRp

Image 2. courtesy of http://bit.ly/dGgQtG

“Obesity worldwide is widening”

In 2008, the latest year for which statistics were available, nearly one woman in seven and one man in 10 were obese, The study run by Sonia Anand and Salim Yusuf of Canada’s McMaster University found obesity ballooning around the world.

Being too fat causes three million premature deaths each year from heart disease, diabetes, cancers and other disorders, according to the WHO.

The researchers described the tableau as “a population emergency.”

“Obesity will cost tens of millions of preventable deaths unless rapid and widespread actions are taken by governments and health-care systems worldwide,” said the report, published by The Lancet.

The problem has been most prevalent in rich nations, rising most in the United States, followed by New Zealand and Australia for women, and Britain and Australia for men.

But many developing countries, especially in the Middle East and in rapidly urbanising areas, are catching up.

These results suggest that overweight affects one-in-three adults and obesity affects one-in-nine adults — a tsunami of obesity that will eventually affect all regions of the world.

Global obesity rates more than doubled for men, from 4.8 percent of male adults in 1980 to 9.8 percent in 2008. For women, the corresponding jump was from 7.9 to 13.8 percent.

Let us all try to eat, sleep and play in a healthier way.

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Image men courtesy of   http://bit.ly/gKufib

Image woman courtesy of  http://bit.ly/dNo9XJ