“Big organics sell out to Monsanto for $$$”

Having trouble deciphering labels organic, certified organic or natural?

After a 12-year battle to keep Monsanto’s Genetically Engineered (GE) crops from contaminating the nation’s 25,000 organic farms and ranches, America’s organic consumers and producers have been sold out!

The Organic Giants lead by Whole Foods Market, Organic Valley, and Stonyfield Farm, have decided to surrender to Monsanto!  Don’t buy from them.

Top executives from these companies have publicly admitted that they no longer oppose the mass commercialization of GE crops, such as Monsanto’s controversial Roundup Ready alfalfa, and are prepared to sit down and cut a deal for “coexistence” with Monsanto and USDA biotech cheerleader Tom Vilsack.

In a cleverly worded, but profoundly misleading email sent to its customers last week, Whole Foods Market, while proclaiming their support for organics and “seed purity,” gave the green light to USDA bureaucrats to approve the “conditional deregulation” of Monsanto’s genetically engineered, herbicide-resistant alfalfa.

“The policy set for GE alfalfa will most likely guide policies for other GE crops as well. True coexistence is a must.”   –  Whole Foods Market, Jan. 21, 2011

Beyond the regulatory euphemism of “conditional deregulation,” this means that WFM and their colleagues are willing to go along with the massive planting of a chemical and energy-intensive GE perennial crop, alfalfa; guaranteed to spread its mutant genes and seeds across the nation; guaranteed to contaminate the alfalfa fed to organic animals; guaranteed to lead to massive poisoning of farm workers and destruction of the essential soil food web by the toxic herbicide, Roundup; and guaranteed to produce Roundup-resistant superweeds that will require even more deadly herbicides such as 2,4 D to be sprayed on millions of acres of alfalfa across the U.S.

In exchange for allowing Monsanto’s premeditated pollution of the alfalfa gene pool, WFM wants “compensation.” In exchange for a new assault on farmworkers and rural communities (a recent large-scale Swedish study found that spraying Roundup doubles farm workers’ and rural residents’ risk of getting cancer), WFM expects the pro-biotech USDA to begin to regulate rather than cheerlead for Monsanto. In payment for a new broad spectrum attack on the soil’s crucial ability to provide nutrition for food crops and to sequester dangerous greenhouse gases (recent studies show that Roundup devastates essential soil microorganisms that provide plant nutrition and sequester climate-destabilizing greenhouse gases), WFM wants the Biotech Bully of St. Louis to agree to pay “compensation” (i.e. hush money) to farmers “for any losses related to the contamination of his crop.”

This merger would also silence the truth in labeling regulations in regard to true organic products. Please help.

Please help the blocking of this unhealthy merger and practices.

Excerpts courtesy of  http://bit.ly/hdBtBG

“The Zen of soap”

Soap RX with the Master Soap Maker

Dragnash?  Pomegranate?  Crunchy Scratchy Lavender?  Red Wine & Flax?  Pumpkin Pie?  Beer?  Sandalwood?

This is not a grocery list, but an inventory of the various chunks and pieces of soap that confront me when I step into my morning shower.  I am a Soap Maker.  So on any given day I may have nine to twelve different soaps in my shower to choose from.  It’s not just the odd sizes of these little soaps that make them unique (I use the remnant and irregular pieces), but the fact that each one has it’s own special character and purpose.

The art of choosing the perfect soap to begin your day

With such a wide selection of soaps, how do I decide?  What makes me choose a particular soap each morning?  I have to admit that there are days, I just stare at them-none of them particularly inviting.  That’s when I know it’s time to create a new soap. Soap scents range from beer to Dragnash, Pomegranate, Crunchy Scratchy Lavender to Red Wine & Flax, Pumpkin Pie, Beer, and Sandalwood blends to name a few.

Some days my process is purely logical. I have made a new soap and needed to test it thoroughly before I offer it for sale.  In which case, I will use the soap every day for a few weeks to make sure it meets Zen of Soap expectations.

Today, my choice was strictly emotional.  The alarm woke me up after a restless night, I was still tired, my sinuses were blocked and I was CRANKY.  I instinctually reached for Crunchy Scratchy Lavender.  The Chamomile, Lavender and Oatmeal worked to sooth my skin and senses.  A hint Eucalyptus Essential Oil managed to help clear my nose.  Ahh, my morning has immediately improved-now I can start my day.

Have a Happy Day !

Joyce Speer, Zen of Soap Artist from  Dragnass Soap will be glad to answer your questions and teach you how to make Zen soaps.

Contact Joyce or sent your questions to Zen of Soap

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“Bubbles under breast skin cancer risk”

The old saying “Beauty is only skin deep”, but cancer can go deeper

applies to breast implant cancer risk too.

U.S. government health officials are investigating a possible link between breast implants and a very rare form of cancer known as anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) after reviewing a handful of cases reported over the last 13 years.

ALC attacks the lymph nodes and skin, and has been reported in the scar tissue that grows around implants. So far, the data suggest women with silicone or saline-gel breast implants “may have a very small but significant risk of ALCL in the scar capsule adjacent to the implant,” the agency said.

The body considers the implant as a foreign substance and sends immune boosting cells to the area around the scar tissue to get rid of it. If it cannot the cell mutation occurs and this can lead to cancer.

The cancer, anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, involves the immune system. It is not breast cancer. It is usually a systemic disease, but in the cases linked to implants, the lymphoma grew in the breast, usually in the capsule of scar tissue that formed around the implant. The cases were discovered because women developed symptoms long after they had healed from the implant surgery lumps, pain, asymmetry of the breasts, fluid buildup and swelling.

Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma begins after scar tissue is formed around the implant:
lumps, pain, asymmetry of the breasts, fluid buildup and swelling.

In some cases simply removing the implant and scar tissue gets rid of the disease, but some women might need chemotherapy and radiation, said Dr. William Maisel, the chief scientist and deputy director for science in the drug agency’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. He said there was some evidence, though not conclusive, that the form of this lymphoma found in implant patients was less aggressive than the usual type.

“We need more data and are asking that health-care professionals tell us about any confirmed cases they identify,” said Dr. William Maisel, chief scientist in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s device unit.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is asking doctors to report all cases of the cancer so the agency can better understand the association. The agency is aware of just 60 cases of the disease worldwide among the estimated five million to 10 million women with implants.
This type of lymphoma in the breast is normally found in only 3 in 100 million women who do not have implants.

The devices are marketed in the U.S. by Allergan Inc. and Mentor Corp.
Resources
Excerpts
courtesy of  http://nyti.ms/fWmOcn

Excerpts courtesy of http://bit.ly/hPHYiE

Excerpts courtesy of http://bit.ly/e8XnCd

“Health risks Benadryl + diphenhydramine”

Drugs commonly taken for a variety of common medical conditions negatively affect your brain, causing long term cognitive impairment. They include such common over-the-counter brands as Benadryl (or Dimedrol in other countries), Dramamine, Excedrin PM, Nytol, Sominex, Tylenol PM, Midol PM and Advil PM though some Unisom products contain doxylamine instead.
Other anticholinergic drugs, such as Paxil, Detrol, Demerol and Elavil are available only by prescription.
One of the oldest antihistamines on the market Benadryl is more effective than even some of the latest prescription drugs. It is frequently used to stop or reduce the uncomfortable itchy and inflammation associated with an allergic reaction. It is fast and often effective at reversing the sometimes dangerous effects of a massive histamine release.
On the other side of this drug’s picture are adverse side effects often worse and more life threatening in children and the elderly or those chronically ill.
Diphenhydramine works by blocking the effect of histamine at H1 receptor sites. This results in effects such as the increase of vascular smooth muscle contraction, thus reducing the redness, hyperthermia and edema that occurs during an inflammatory reaction. In addition, by blocking the H1 receptor on peripheral nociceptors, diphenhydramine decreases their sensitization and consequently reduces itching that is associated with an allergic reaction.
Benadryl is the oldest antihistamine, diphenhydramine, is a potent anticholinergic agent.
The possible effects of Diphenhydramine include:

Ataxia; loss of coordination
Decreased mucus production in the nose and throat; consequent dry, sore throat
Xerostomia or dry-mouth with possible acceleration of dental caries
Cessation of perspiration; consequent decreased epidermal thermal dissipation leading to warm, blotchy, or red skin
Increased body temperature
Pupil dilation (mydriasis); consequent sensitivity to bright light (photophobia)
Loss of accommodation (loss of focusing ability, blurred vision — cycloplegia)
Double-vision (diplopia)
Increased heart rate (tachycardia)
Tendency to be easily startled
Urinary retention
Diminished bowel movement, sometimes ileus – (decreases motility via the vagus nerve)
Increased intraocular pressure; dangerous for people with narrow-angle glaucoma
Shaking
Possible effects in the central nervous system resemble those associated with delirium, and may include:
Confusion
Disorientation
Agitation
Euphoria or dysphoria
Respiratory depression
Memory problems
Inability to concentrate
Wandering thoughts; inability to sustain a train of thought
Incoherent speech
Wakeful myoclonic jerking
Unusual sensitivity to sudden sounds
Illogical thinking
Photophobia
Visual disturbances
Periodic flashes of light
Periodic changes in visual field
Visual snow
Restricted or “tunnel vision”
Visual, auditory, or other sensory hallucinations
Warping or waving of surfaces and edges
Textured surfaces
“Dancing” lines; “spiders”, insects; form constants
Lifelike objects indistinguishable from reality
Hallucinated presence of people not actually there
Rarely: seizures, coma, and death

Since 2002, the US FDA requires special labeling warning against using multiple products that contain diphenhydramine. Diphenhydramine has been shown to build tolerance against its sedation effectiveness very quickly, with placebo-like results after a third day of common dosage.

Caution:

Severe reactions (children) to diphenhydramine are documented, particularly amongst children, and it may cause excitation instead of sedation.
Severe reactions (elderly) are also common in the elderly.Because of potential for more severe side effects, diphenhydramine is on the “Beers list” to avoid in the elderly. (See NCQA’s HEDIS Measure: Use of High Risk Medications in the Elderly,

Caution: Benadryl Itch Stopping Gel contains additional ingredients including camphor. It is dangerous when swallowed.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/hLwHna

Excerpts courtesy of   http://bit.ly/fgK7Om

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“4 steps to Breaking The Anger Habit”

Anger is a response learned in childhood to protect us

from the vulnerable feelings that lie beneath the protection.

Four steps that have helped me break the anger habit and reverse the negative consequences that inevitably accompany it are: Awareness, Returning to Center, Learning and Cleaning Up Messes.

Step 1. Awareness – Anger indicates a disconnection from the heart. (Words that to me are the same as heart include: soul, center, essence, true self, authentic self, or Spirit.)  A heart connection is accompanied by compassion and an openness to learning.  When we have committed to being heart-connected more of the time, this awareness gives us choice.  Without it we’re stuck blaming others for our anger, making excuses for it or self-righteously justifying it.  With the awareness that our anger has triggered something in us we take personal responsibility for our choice to either continue being angry or do something that returns us to our center.

Step 2. Returning to center – We all know how to return to center.

Such behaviors include: taking a deep breath (or 2 or more), doing a physical activity such as running around the block, dancing or pounding a pillow, putting on a piece of music that opens our heart, taking a walk in nature, (doing something that makes you smile awhile – editor’s note) or free form writing of our feelings.

Step 3. Learning – Once we’re back in our center we can learn more about the fears and beliefs that got us off center and what we can do to resolve those fears by bringing our beliefs into alignment with our heart.

Step 4. Cleaning up messes – Anger has a negative effect both on ourselves and our relationship with those at the other end of our anger.  Cleaning up these effects means taking responsibility for disrespecting others and expressing our sadness to those whom we have disrespected.  This is essential for rebuilding the trust that is eroded by our anger.

Judging ourselves for getting angry makes taking responsibility much more difficult.  Seeing anger as merely a disconnection from our heart rather than as bad or wrong makes it easier.  The analogy that I use that has made it much easier to not blame myself can be seen at,

Guest writer Dr. Jordan Paul welcomes all comments and questions.

Please submit responses

To  reach Dr. Paul or read more of his articles

Resources

Article by Dr. Jordan Paul

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“TLC +light+caring +chocolate 4 dementia”

Like the old TV show said give me the simple life, Beatitudes in Phoenix, AZ. allows its patients like Ms. Nance, 96, afflicted with Alzheimer’s, “to sleep, be bathed and dine whenever she wants, even at 2 a.m. She could eat anything, too, no matter how unhealthy, including unlimited chocolate.
And she was given a baby doll, a move that seemed so jarring that a supervisor initially objected until she saw how calm Ms. Nance became when she rocked, caressed and fed her “baby,” often agreeing to eat herself after the doll “ate” several spoonfuls.
Dementia patients at Beatitudes are allowed practically anything that brings comfort, even an alcoholic “nip at night,” said Tena Alonzo, director of research. “Whatever your vice is, we’re your folks,” she said.
Once, Ms. Alonzo said: “The state tried to cite us for having chocolate on the nursing chart. They were like, ‘It’s not a medication.’ Yes, it is. It’s better than Xanax.”
It is an unusual posture for a nursing home, but Beatitudes is actually following some of the latest science. Research suggests that creating positive emotional experiences for Alzheimer’s patients diminishes distress and behavior problems.”

In desperation medical people are trying many different non-drug approaches to their care.There is no effective medical treatment for Alzheimer’s yet, most dementia therapy is the care giving performed by families and nursing homes. Some 11 million people care for Alzheimer’s-afflicted relatives at home. In nursing homes, two-thirds of residents have some dementia.
Caregiving support training a priority

Caregiving is considered so crucial that several federal and state agencies, including the Department of Veterans Affairs, are adopting research-tested programs to support and train caregivers. This month, the Senate Special Committee on Aging held a forum about Alzheimer’s care giving.
“There’s actually better evidence and more significant results in caregiver interventions than there is in anything to treat this disease so far,” said Lisa P. Gwyther, education director for the Bryan Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Duke University.
The National Institute on Aging and the Administration on Aging are now financing caregiving studies on “things that just kind of make the life of an Alzheimer’s patient and his or her caregiver less burdensome,” said Sidney M. Stahl, chief of the Individual Behavioral Processes branch of the Institute on Aging.

Techniques include using food, scheduling, art, music and exercise to generate positive emotions; engaging patients in activities that salvage fragments of their skills; and helping caregivers be more accepting and competent.

Caregiving at Beatitudes in Phoenix, AZ. takes on a wholistic individualized tender loving care, hopefully more organizations and institutions will follow this model.

Resources

Excerpts and Image courtesy of   http://nyti.ms/egVcG1

“Scientists unlock chocolate genes”

Don’t mess with Mother Nature
Researchers have found the genes that code for the production of the cocoa butter in Theobroma cacao, needed to make sweets, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics.
Studying the genes of Mother Nature’s finest crop cacao, researchers are finding ways to make the best chocolate in the world “better”. Better means, increased disease resistance and increased profitability to the grower.

Researchers have found genes that code for the production of cocoa butter, a substance highly prized in chocolate making, confectionery, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Most cocoa beans are already about 50 percent fat, but these 84 genes control not only the amounts fat produced, but quality of the cocoa butter.  Altering these genes might produce chocolate with better flavors, aromas and even “healthier” chocolate by influencing the production of flavonoids, natural antioxidants and terpenoids, hormones and pigments.
The team sequenced the DNA of a variety of Theobroma cacao, considered to produce the world’s finest chocolate. The Maya domesticated this variety of Theobroma cacao, Criollo, about 3,000 years ago in Central America, and it is one of the oldest domesticated tree crops. Today, many growers prefer to grow hybrid cacao trees that produce chocolate of lower quality but are more resistant to disease.
“Fine cocoa production is estimated to be less than 5 percent of the world cocoa production because of low productivity and disease susceptibility,” said Guiltinan, professor of plant molecular biology.
The researchers report in the current issue of Nature Genetics “consumers have shown an increased interest for high-quality chocolate made with cocoa of good quality and for dark chocolate, containing a higher percentage of cocoa, while also taking into account environmental and ethical criteria for cocoa production.”

Author: Mary Wolken, PhD., Ex. Dir CMA

Resources

Excerpts and Image courtesy of http://bit.ly/hrSLjG

“Where did my anger come from?”

Conventional thinking is that it is good and healthy to express anger. While withholding anger is certainly not in anyone’s best interest, using anger to get others to change their behavior carries with it many negative consequences.

I asked myself, “Where is my anger coming from? ” Then i began to review when I got angry and observed :

My anger seemed to be deeply ingrained in my system and it
Was I born with this anger? – my intuition said no.
Was it a learned response and if so to what? Yes, I learned to use anger to get my way and to protect my sensitive nature from my inner feelings of fear, pain, helplessness
How did I feel about myself when I acted out in anger? When I asked that question I learned that I felt at that moment I was not good enough, lovable or adequate.

So actually, in truth my anger is an expression of my weakness and confusion, not my strength. Being afraid to show my vulnerable feelings is a reflection of my fear that I might be judged by others, and more importantly by myself as weak, unmanly, bad, wrong, stupid, or that I can’t handle my softer feelings and I will be rejected, or that I will be manipulated into doing things that I really don’t want to do.

I have come to understand that when my anger is manipulative it does not contain compassion and a desire to learn and therefore, is not coming from my heart and I am not in oneness.

This is the first in a series of articles and discussions with Dr. Jordan Paul, PhD.
Excerpts from Dr. Paul’s article ANGER or REAL STRENGTH

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“13 Best wishes and smiles for 2011”

Throughout the rest of this 2011 and beyond Complementary Medicine Association wishes you and those you love:

May you always make the right moves.

May your cup runneth over with love.

May you always find shelter from any storm.

May you remain good looking and looking good!

May you find the perfect diet for your soul.
(If this face doesn’t make you want to stop eating sausage, nothing will.)

May you find perfect balance in the company you keep.

May you have as much fun as you can before someone makes you stop.

May the worst thing that happens to you come in slobbery pink and furry tan.

May you manage to make time for siesta.

May all the new folks you meet be interesting and kind.

May your accessories always harmonize with your natural beauty!

Should your mouth be bigger than your stomach, may you have a chewing good time!



And may your friends always bring you comfort!

May You Have a Joy filled NEW YEAR
Overflowing with Compassion, Prosperity, Health And Hope

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