Mouthwashes increase health risks

mouthwashTo combat bad breath, mouth rinses take one of two approaches. Some mouthwashes kill the smelly bacteria, while others neutralize or mask the odors produced by sulfur compounds. Antibacterial mouth rinses, as well as those containing chemicals that neutralize odors, do temporarily control bad breath, but products containing chlorhexidine gluconate a substance that kills bacteria, resulted in noticeable but temporary staining of the tongue and teeth. The discoloration can look like tobacco staining, a dark brownish color.(1)

In one study plaque accumulation and gingival condition were recorded using plaque index and gingival index. On the basis of mean baseline plaque and gingival scores, subjects were allocated to four different groups, using their assigned products twice a day, before bed and after breakfast. The results of this clinical study indicate that better therapeutic efficacy can be achieved using gels for treating oral infections than conventional treatments using mouthwash. (2)
Risks from using alcohol based mouthwashes
In two well documented studies researchers have found that the daily use of commercial mouthwashes with a low pH increase the risk of oral, throat cancer and stomach upset, besides greatly increasing teeth sensitivity by eroding tooth enamel and higher levels of bad breath according to recent studies.

In thew first study, at the Division of Restorative Dentistry in Bristol, U.K., researchers found that use of low pH mouthwashes cause erosion of dental enamel and increased sensitivity in teeth to hot or cold changes. (3)

In another study researchers from the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil evaluated control studies from 1998 to 2002 of 309 patients with oral cancer of the mouth and pharynx and 468 controls matched by sex and age. Results show that daily mouthwash use was strongly associated with cancer of the pharynx and also associated with cancer of the mouth.

Detailed information on smoking, alcohol consumption, schooling, and oral health and hygiene were obtained through interviews.

Oral cancer is linked to bleeding gums and failure to have dental But not to he use of full dental prosthesis.
Mouthwash works for a short period of time by killing lots of germs, but because of the high alcohol content the mouth dries. A dry mouth means the salivary glands are dry so the amount of saliva produced is low and thus they are unable to wash away bacteria. This results in even high production of bacteria and even bad breath. This overproduction of bacteria stress the mucous lining of your mouth, throat and stomach and can decrease your immune system your immune system and require your liver to work even harder to detoxify the body and produce the vitamins and minerals your body needs to stay healthy.(3)

Recommendations:
The team strongly suggests that low pH mouthwashes should not be considered for long term or continuous use and should never be used prior to brushing.

Mouthwash works for a short period of time by killing lots of germs, but because of the high alcohol content the mouth dries. A dry mouth means the salivary glands are dry so the amount of saliva produced is low and thus they are unable to wash away bacteria. This results in even high production of bacteria and even bad breath. This overproduction of bacteria stress the mucous lining of your mouth, throat and stomach and can decrease your immune system your immune system and require your liver to work even harder to detoxify the body and produce the vitamins and minerals your body needs to stay healthy.

Conclusions

There are no substitutes for good oral hygiene and quality dental care. Your immune, dental. digestive and immune system depends on it.

Resources

1. Excerpts courtesy of Live Science.com Do mouthwashes work? mouthwash-science

2.Excerpts courtesy of FDI World Dental Press atypon-link.com/FDI/indj.2004.54.4.219

3. Excerpts courtesy of Naturalnews.com naturalnews.com/024591.

Image courtesy of Scienceproject.com scienceproject.com/projects/intermediate/images

Rarified sportmanship -people helping people

There were no other options for this coach. It didn’t matter that his DeKalb, Ill., High School basketball team had ridden a bus two and a half hours to get to Milwaukee, then waited another hour past game time to play. Didn’t matter that the game was close, or that this was a chance to beat a big city team.

Johntel Franklin scored 10 points in the game following the loss of his mother.
Something else was on Dave Rohlman’s mind when he asked for a volunteer to shoot two free throws awarded his team on a technical foul in the second quarter. His senior captain raised his hand, ready to go to the line as he had many times before.

Only this time it was different.

“You realize you’re going to miss them, don’t you?” Rohlman said.

Darius McNeal nodded his head. He understood what had to be done.

The Barbs were playing a non-conference game on the road against Milwaukee Madison. It was the third meeting between the two schools.
The teams planned to get together after the game and share some pizzas and basketball-main_fullsoda. But the game itself between these friendly rivals almost never took place.

Hours earlier, the mother of Milwaukee Madison senior captain Johntel Franklin died at a local hospital. Carlitha Franklin in remission from five-year fight with cervical cancer hemorrhaged suddenly while Johntel was taking his college ACT exam.

Johntel and a few teammates were at the hospital late that afternoon when the life-support system was removed. His mom Carlitha was just 39 years old.

“She was young and they were real close,” said Milwaukee coach Aaron Womack Jr., who was at the hospital. “He was very distraught and it happened so suddenly he didn’t have time to grieve.”

Womack was going to cancel the game, but Franklin told him he wanted the team to play. And play they did, even though the game started late and Milwaukee Madison dressed only eight players.

Early in the second quarter, Womack saw someone out of the corner of his eye. It was Franklin, who came there directly from the hospital to root his teammates on.

The Knights had possession, so Womack called a time out. His players went over and hugged their grieving teammate. Fans came out of the stands to do the same.

“We got back to playing the game and I asked if he wanted to come and sit on the bench,” Womack said during a telephone interview.

“No,” Franklin replied. “I want to play.”

There was just one problem. Since Franklin wasn’t on the pre-game roster, putting him in meant drawing a technical foul that would give DeKalb two free throws.

Though it was a tight game, Womack was willing to give up the two points. It was more important to help his senior guard and co-captain deal with his grief by playing.

Over on the other bench, though, Rohlman wasn’t so willing to take them. He told the referees to forget the technical and just let Franklin play.

“I could hear them arguing for five to seven minutes, saying, `We’re not taking it, we’re not taking it,” Womack said. “The refs told them, no, that’s the rule. You have to take them.”

That’s when Rohlman asked for volunteers, and McNeal’s hand went up.

He went alone to the free throw line, dribbled the ball a couple of times, and looked at the rim.

His first attempt went about two feet, bouncing a couple of times as it rolled toward the end line. The second barely left his hand.

It didn’t take long for the Milwaukee players to figure out what was going on.

They stood and turned toward the DeKalb bench and started applauding the gesture of sportsmanship. Soon, so did everybody in the stands.

“I did it for the guy who lost his mom,” McNeal told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. “It was the right thing to do.”

They may not remember our record 20 years from now, but they’ll remember what happened in that gym that night – the life lesson Dave Rohlman, head coach of the opposing DeKalb team on what his players will take away from this experience.
Franklin would go on to score 10 points, and Milwaukee Madison broke open the game in the second half to win 62-47. Afterward, the teams went out for pizza, two players from each team sharing each pie.

Franklin stopped by briefly, thankful that his team was there for him.

“I got kind of emotional but it helped a lot just to play,” he said. “I felt like I had a lot of support out there.”

Carlitha Franklin’s funeral was last Friday, and the school turned out for her and her son. Cheerleaders came in uniform, and everyone from the principal and teachers to Johntel’s classmates were there.

“Even the cooks from school showed up,” Womack said. “It lets you know what kind of kid he is.”

“We maybe don’t have the best basketball players in the world but they go to class and take care of business,” Womack said. “We have a losing record but there’s life lessons going on, good ones.”

None so good, though, as the moment a team and a player decided there were more important things than winning and having good stats.

God bless you all.-thanks.

Yes, DeKalb would go home with a loss. But it was a trip they’ll never forget.

“This is something our kids will hold for a lifetime,” Rohlman said. “They may not remember our record 20 years from now, but they’ll remember what happened in that gym that night.”

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of Rivals High from Yahoo Sports.com and AP

Amid the grieving, a rare act of sportsmanship February 18, 2009.

highschool.rivals.com

Image basketball courtesy of Global Photo and i.chow.com

i.ehow.com/images/GlobalPhoto/basketball

Worms spread by not washing your hands

tapeworm

Do you or someone you love need another reason for good hands hygiene?

Watch the video below; then read the rest of this post.

http://media2.foxnews.com/112008/worm_tumor_700.wmv

Trichinosis is a parasitic disease caused by eating raw or undercooked pork and wild game infected with the larvae of a species of roundworm Trichinella spiralis, commonly called the trichina worm. The few cases in the United States are mostly the result of eating undercooked game, bear meat, or home reared pigs. It is most common in the developing world and where pigs are commonly fed raw garbage.

Signs and symptoms

The great majority of trichinosis infections have either minor or no symptoms and no complications. Trichinosis initially involves the intestines. Within 1-2 days of contagion, symptoms such as nausea, heartburn, dyspepsia, and diarrhea may appear; the severity of these symptoms depends on the extent of the infection. Later on, as the worms encyst in different parts of the human body, other manifestations of the disease may appear, such as headache, fever, chills, cough, eye swelling, joint pain and muscle pain, petechiae, and itching.

Most symptoms subside within a few years. The most dangerous case is worms entering the central nervous system and the brain stem. They cannot survive there, but they may cause enough damage to produce serious neurological deficits (such as ataxia or respiratory paralysis), and even death.

Life Cycle of the worm

The worm can infect any species of mammal that consumes its encysted larval stages. When an animal eats meat that contains infective Trichinella cysts, the acid in the stomach dissolves the hard covering of the cyst and releases the worms. The worms pass into the small intestine and, in 1–2 days, become mature. After mating, adult females produce larvae, which break through the intestinal wall and travel through the lymphatic system to the circulatory system to find a suitable cell. Larvae can penetrate any cell, but can only survive in skeletal muscle. Within a muscle cell, the worms curl up and direct the cell functioning much as a virus does. The cell is now called a nurse cell. Soon, a net of blood vessels surround the nurse cell, providing added nutrition for the larva inside.

A blood test or muscle biopsy can identify trichinosis. Stool studies can identify adult worms, with females being about 3 mm long and males about half that size

Symptoms can be treated with aspirin and corticosteroids. Thiabendazole can kill adult worms in the intestine; however, there is no treatment that kills the larvae. Correct diagnosis and surgery may be needed.

Resources

Excerpts courtesy of

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trichinosis