Beware of Wild Mushrooms

Even the most experienced shrumers can misidentify mushrooms from time to time. Nicholas Evans and family ended up in a London hospital after eating a batch of wild cooked mushrooms on a Scotland holiday.

Evans “The Horse Whisperer” is recovering in a hospital after eating poisonous mushrooms during a holiday in Scotland. Tests confirmed that some of the mushrooms included the highly toxic variety Cortinarius speciosissimus, which attacks the kidneys.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080902/ap_en_ot/people_evans

FDA + cloned meat = consumer beware

and their offspring were as safe to eat as products obtained from traditional animals. Before then, farmers and ranchers had followed a voluntary moratorium that prevented the sale of clones and their offspring.

It is theoretically possible” offspring from clones are in the food supply, said Siobhan DeLancey, an FDA spokeswoman.

What kind of a statement is this from a regulatory and safety board!!!-Editor’s note.

FDA and the U.S. Agriculture Department have said it is impossible to differentiate between cloned animals, their offspring and conventionally bred animals, making it difficult to know if offspring are in the food supply.

Then avoid eating all conventional grown and processed meat until the industry stardards for efficacy and safety are rock solid.-Editor’s note.

Although USDA in January “asked” the cloning industry to prolong the ban on selling products from cloned animals during a “transition” period expected to last at least several months. That ban did not extend to meat and milk from the clone’s offspring

(Buyer beware FDA again fails the consumer.-Editor’s note.)


“It worries me that this technology is out of control in so many ways,” said Charles Margulis, a spokesman with the Center for Environmental Health. The possibility of offspring being in the food supply “is just another element of that,” he said.

Despite the backing from FDA, major food companies including Tyson Foods Inc, the largest U.S. meat company, and Smithfield Foods Inc have said they would avoid using cloned animals because of safety concerns.

The Center for Food Safety and Friends of the Earth said 20 food producers and retailers vowed not to use ingredients from cloned animals in their products included Kraft Foods Inc, General Mills Inc, Campbell Soup Co, Nestle SA, California Pizza Kitchen Inc and Supervalu Inc.Susan Davison, director of corporate affairs with Kraft, said product safety was “not the only factor” the company considers. “We must also carefully consider additional factors such as consumer benefits and acceptance … and research in the U.S. indicates that consumers are currently not receptive to ingredients from cloned animals,” she said.

Clones’ offspring may be in food supply: FDA by C. Doering http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080902/sc_nm/cloning_food_dc